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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.30
Of four hundred and eighty who rose to the grade of brigadier-general, an inquiry, by no means partial, inclines me to the belief that there are not two hundred in life. With the exception of Thomas H. Watts, of Alabama, Joseph E. Brown, of Georgia, Zebulon B. Vance, of North Carolina, M. L. Bonham and A. G. Magrah, of South Carolina, Isham G. Harris, of Tennessee, and perhaps Richard Hawes, of Kentucky, all the war-governors of Confederate States are dead. We have not sufficient data titution of the Confederate States was signed by forty-nine delegates. All who affixed their signatures to that memorable document are dead except C. G. Memminger, W. Porcher Miles and William W. Boyce, of South Carolina, Augustus R. Wright, of Georgia, David P. Lewis and Jabez L. M. Curry, of Alabama, W. P. Harris, Alexander M. Clayton and J. A. P. Campbell, of Mississippi, Alexander de Clouet, of Louisiana, and Thomas N. Waul and John H. Reagan, of Texas. And who can furnish even a partia
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.30
issioned as major-generals in Confederate service, if my information be correct, only forty-five are now numbered among the living. Of four hundred and eighty who rose to the grade of brigadier-general, an inquiry, by no means partial, inclines me to the belief that there are not two hundred in life. With the exception of Thomas H. Watts, of Alabama, Joseph E. Brown, of Georgia, Zebulon B. Vance, of North Carolina, M. L. Bonham and A. G. Magrah, of South Carolina, Isham G. Harris, of Tennessee, and perhaps Richard Hawes, of Kentucky, all the war-governors of Confederate States are dead. We have not sufficient data to speak with certainty in regard to the senators and representatives in Confederate Congress, but we do know that the mortality among them has been commensurate with that which has occurred in other departments. Of those who tarry with us, not a few have almost reached the last span in the bridge of life, and must soon fall into the dark stream which bears away th
Essex County (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.30
he Second Battalion, Georgia Sharpshooters, is lying dead in Asheville, North Carolina. The strong hand of mortality has also been laid upon two noted Confederates. William Smith, a war-governor of Virginia and a Major-General in Confederate service, departed this life at his home in Warrenton, Virginia, on the 18th of May, at the advanced age of ninety years; and, on the 18th of July, Robert Mercer Taliaferro Hunter quietly ended his long and honorable earthly career. Born in Essex county, Virginia, on the 21st of April, 1809, Mr. Hunter acquired his collegiate education at the University of Virginia. Having completed his professional preparation at the Winchester Law School, he was called to the Bar in 1830. In early manhood his active interest in public affairs, an honorable ambition for preferment, and the exhibition of unusual abilities, were recognized and rewarded by an election to the Virginia House of Delegates, of which he remained a member for three years. In 183
Montgomery (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.30
and continued to be a prominent member of that august body until, in 1861; Virginia severed her connection with the Union. When the State of Virginia passed her Ordinance of Secession and sanctioned a resolution adopting the constitution of the Provisional Government of the Confederate States of America, a delegation, consisting of Mr. Hunter, and the Honorable William C. Rives, John W. Brockenbrough, and W. R. Staples, was elected to represent that State in the Provisional Congress at Montgomery. Upon the adjournment of that Congress to meet at Richmond, the designated capital of the infant Republic, Mr. Hunter was again chosen as a delegate from the Old Dominion. It will be remembered that Mr. Toombs resigned the portfolio of the State Department and accepted service in the field with the rank of Brigadier-General. In this emergency President Davis summoned Mr. Hunter to his Cabinet. He accepted the appointment of Secretary of State, and discharged the duties of that respo
Russia (Russia) (search for this): chapter 1.30
e Confederacy abroad, James M. Mason and William L. Yancey, accredited to Great Britain, John Slidell, accredited to France, P. A. Rost, accredited to Spain, John T. Pickett, accredited to Mexico, Bishop Lynch, accredited to the States of the Church, and John Forsyth, Martin J. Crawford, A. B. Roman, and Charles J. Faulkner, accredited to the United States, are dead. The octogenarian, A. Dudley Mann, accredited to Belgium, resides in France. The Honorable Lucius Q. C. Lamar, accredited to Russia, is a member of President Cleveland's Cabinet, and General William Preston, accredited to Mexico, rejoices in his broad acres in the blue-grass region of Kentucky. Among the Consular, Confidential and Foreign Agents of the Confederacy we note the demise of C. C. Clay, Jacob Thompson, James P. Holcombe, Charles J. Helm, Colin J. McRae, George N. Sanders, J. L. O'Sullivan, and of others holding less important positions. Of those who bore rank as full generals in the armies of the Confede
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.30
ble position until the organization of the Confederate Senate, when he became a member of that body, and retained his seat, as the leading Senator from Virginia, until the close of the war. The valuable services he rendered, both in the National Assembly of the United States and in the Confederate Congress, are well remembered. The conspicuous part borne by him when, at the instance of Mr. Davis, and in association with Vice-President Stephens and Judge Campbell, he participated in the Fortress Monroe Conference, is fresh in our recollection. Subsequent to the conclusion of the war Mr. Hunter was for some time the treasurer of his native State. Of late years he has led a retired life, toiling for bread in the midst of disappointments and losses. At the last, we doubt not, he welcomed surcease from labor and anxieties in the repose of a simple but honored grave. Thus do we inscribe a page in memory of one who held high office and discharged important duties in the civil servic
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.30
an enviable reputation for integrity, political sagacity, and wise statesmanship. Possessing uncommon intellect, and exhibiting admirable traits of character, he was an earnest student, an engaging speaker, was gifted by nature with a noble presence, and was in every way a man of commanding influence. In 1847 he became a Senator of the United States, and continued to be a prominent member of that august body until, in 1861; Virginia severed her connection with the Union. When the State of Virginia passed her Ordinance of Secession and sanctioned a resolution adopting the constitution of the Provisional Government of the Confederate States of America, a delegation, consisting of Mr. Hunter, and the Honorable William C. Rives, John W. Brockenbrough, and W. R. Staples, was elected to represent that State in the Provisional Congress at Montgomery. Upon the adjournment of that Congress to meet at Richmond, the designated capital of the infant Republic, Mr. Hunter was again chosen a
Belgium (Belgium) (search for this): chapter 1.30
ember of the National Legislature. Of the commissioners who represented the Confederacy abroad, James M. Mason and William L. Yancey, accredited to Great Britain, John Slidell, accredited to France, P. A. Rost, accredited to Spain, John T. Pickett, accredited to Mexico, Bishop Lynch, accredited to the States of the Church, and John Forsyth, Martin J. Crawford, A. B. Roman, and Charles J. Faulkner, accredited to the United States, are dead. The octogenarian, A. Dudley Mann, accredited to Belgium, resides in France. The Honorable Lucius Q. C. Lamar, accredited to Russia, is a member of President Cleveland's Cabinet, and General William Preston, accredited to Mexico, rejoices in his broad acres in the blue-grass region of Kentucky. Among the Consular, Confidential and Foreign Agents of the Confederacy we note the demise of C. C. Clay, Jacob Thompson, James P. Holcombe, Charles J. Helm, Colin J. McRae, George N. Sanders, J. L. O'Sullivan, and of others holding less important posi
France (France) (search for this): chapter 1.30
Postmaster-General John H. Reagan lives, and is a member of the National Legislature. Of the commissioners who represented the Confederacy abroad, James M. Mason and William L. Yancey, accredited to Great Britain, John Slidell, accredited to France, P. A. Rost, accredited to Spain, John T. Pickett, accredited to Mexico, Bishop Lynch, accredited to the States of the Church, and John Forsyth, Martin J. Crawford, A. B. Roman, and Charles J. Faulkner, accredited to the United States, are dead. The octogenarian, A. Dudley Mann, accredited to Belgium, resides in France. The Honorable Lucius Q. C. Lamar, accredited to Russia, is a member of President Cleveland's Cabinet, and General William Preston, accredited to Mexico, rejoices in his broad acres in the blue-grass region of Kentucky. Among the Consular, Confidential and Foreign Agents of the Confederacy we note the demise of C. C. Clay, Jacob Thompson, James P. Holcombe, Charles J. Helm, Colin J. McRae, George N. Sanders, J. L. O
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 1.30
y Department, we find upon the death-roll the names of Secretary Stephen R. Mallory, of Commodore F. Forrest, Chief of the Bureau of Orders, of Admirals Franklin Buchanan and Raphael Semmes, of Commodores Tattnall, Maury, Whittle, Hollins, Ingraham, and of many other prominent officers. Postmaster-General John H. Reagan lives, and is a member of the National Legislature. Of the commissioners who represented the Confederacy abroad, James M. Mason and William L. Yancey, accredited to Great Britain, John Slidell, accredited to France, P. A. Rost, accredited to Spain, John T. Pickett, accredited to Mexico, Bishop Lynch, accredited to the States of the Church, and John Forsyth, Martin J. Crawford, A. B. Roman, and Charles J. Faulkner, accredited to the United States, are dead. The octogenarian, A. Dudley Mann, accredited to Belgium, resides in France. The Honorable Lucius Q. C. Lamar, accredited to Russia, is a member of President Cleveland's Cabinet, and General William Preston,
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