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age 622). Dunlap, commanding the Ninth Arkansas of the same brigade, thus reports, April 14th, 1862: Continuing to follow the enemy until the position became of extreme peril, placed, as we were, between two batteries, both pouring destructive volleys of grape and cannister into our ranks. In this position we received orders to fall back to a safe position and await further orders. By this time night came on. Colonel Martin withdrew, * * this closed the fighting of the 6th of April, he stated, adding that the loss of the regiment was about one hundred killed and wounded. (Ibid, 625.) And this brings us to General Polk, the last of the three corps commanders of the Confederate army at Shiloh, referred to by Colonel Johnston as having believed that the victory was won and would have been consummated by the capture of Grant's army, * * but for Beauregard's order of withdrawal, late as it was when that order reached anybody; that is to say, on the very edge of dusk, and be
tion of the so-called lost opportunity, on the evening of April 6th, 1862. General Thomas Jordan, Adjutant—General of the Constile movement against the last Federal position of the 6th of April, that had every prospect of success, but which was stopts became separated from each other, etc. Thus closed Sunday, April 6th, upon my brigade. But, as may likewise be seen frere are their statements touching the last hours of the 6th of April, statements that were before Generals Bragg and Withersdisembarked at about five o'clock on the evening of the 6th of April, and marched up the hill as quietly as possible, and thnd seven hundred officers and men on the morning of the 6th of April, Cleburne found his brigade muster but eight hundred oncourse, as the sun went down not later than 6:25 on the 6th of April, on the field of Shiloh, General Polk, writing nearly sal Cheatham's lucid explanation of the last hour of the 6th of April, but I will only cite the following from Colonel George
eived to withdraw out of the immediate fire of the gunboats, would have been able, before the darkness of night set in, to carry the ridge occupied by Webster's fifty-odd guns, supported by Ammen's brigade of Buell's army, as also by the remains of Hurlbut's, Stuart's and W. H. Wallace's brigades, and certain other fragmentary commands that had been organized at the river-side by Grant out of the best material of his broken regiments. Upon this point Ammen's personal diary, dated on the 7th of April, is much more specific and full than his official report, that I must be excused for quoting at length from my former West Point professor as follows: General Nelson went over in the first boat with the Thirty-Sixth Indiana, Colonel Grose; General Nelson ordered me to remain and see my brigade over. * * * * On the top of the banks near some buildings I found the Thirty-Sixth Indiana partly formed in line. * * * * Here, too, were Generals Grant, Buell, and Nelson, * * * * General Gra
t 6:30 P. M., and soon after the enemy withdrew, owing, I suppose, to the darkness. —(Ibid, page 324). Further, and finally, General Prentiss in his report fixes the hour when he surrendered, after one of the most resolute, obstinate defenses of an untrenched position that was made during the whole war, namely, at 5:30 P. M., while Colonel Gedde, of the Eighth Iowa, did not surrender his forces at this point until 6 P. M. Colonel Grose, of the Thirty-sixth Indiana, also reports, on the 8th of April, that the firing continued until near dusk, (Ibid, page 337); while Lieutenant-Colonel Nicholas L. Anderson, Sixth Ohio, reports that his regiment was disembarked at about five o'clock on the evening of the 6th of April, and marched up the hill as quietly as possible, and that under Ammen's orders it was placed in support of a battery, (Ibid, page 339). Further, Colonel F. C. Jones reports that the Twenty-fourth Ohio was landed at 5:30 P. M. and formed in line of battle on the river hill,
the quarter of the field with General Bragg, and I refer to the reports of Colonel Pond, Colonel Monton, Major Gober (Sixteenth Louisiana), Colonel Marshall J. Smith and Colonel Looney, Thirty-eighth Tennessee, chiefly to show that no order reached them to retire, and that, up to the very edge of night, they were being employed on the Confederate left by orders of General Hardee in desultory, resultless, though bloody conflicts. Colonel Fagan, of Gibson's brigade, writing as early as the 9th of April, states: It was late in the afternoon when the enemy was repulsed, and was followed in the direction of the river (after the capture of Prentiss). That night we slept in the enemy's tents, worn with fatigue, decimated in numbers, but elated that such a hard-fought day had such a glorious close. —(Ibid, page 488.) Evidently Colonel Fagan had not heard of the Lost opportunity when he wrote, nor had Colonel H. W. Allen at the date of his report of April 10th, neither had Captain Dub
decimated in numbers, but elated that such a hard-fought day had such a glorious close. —(Ibid, page 488.) Evidently Colonel Fagan had not heard of the Lost opportunity when he wrote, nor had Colonel H. W. Allen at the date of his report of April 10th, neither had Captain Dubroca (of the Thirteenth Louisiana), who commanded the regiment at the close of the action. Colonel Hodge, of the Nineteenth Louisiana (Gibson's brigade), is thus specific as to the lateness of the hour: After the the ground and were destructive. —(Rebellion Records, Volume X, Part 1, pages 333-34). The hour that Ammen's brigade marched up the hill from Pittsburg Landing, and the lateness of the repulse, is thus reported by General Nelson as early as April 10th: At 5 P. M. the head of my column marched up the bank at Pittsburg Landing, and took up its position in the road under fire of the Rebel artillery, so close had they approached the landing. I found a semi-circle of artillery, totally un
3.) Captain W. G. Poole, commanding the Florida battalion, as early as April 12th reports that, after the successful affair with Prentiss, his battalion, with a portion of the brigade (Patton Anderson's) proceeded forward within range of the heavy guns on the Tennessee river, where we were for some time exposed to the enemy's shells. * * * We then fell back to the enemy's camp and bivouacked for the night.—(Ibid, page 505). Colonel Charles Jones (Seventh Louisiana), as early as the 11th of April reports that, after taking part in the successful operation against Prentiss, General Anderson, his brigade commander, came up with the Twentieth Louisiana and ordered the line formed: At this moment I was wounded in the left arm with a minie-ball and retired. After having my wound dressed, I immediately returned to the field in search of my command. Fell in with General Ruggles and reported myself to him. He invited me to remain with him, as the action was drawing to a close. T
ents that were before Generals Bragg and Withers when they wrote their reports. Lieutenant-Colonel W. D. Chadwick, commanding Twenty-sixth Alabama, as early as April 12th reports that: Having only about two hundred men left, and seeing that they must all be sacrificed if I remained, without gaining any material advantage, I your headquarters, but unable to do so. —(Rebellion Records, Volume X, Part I, page 493.) Captain W. G. Poole, commanding the Florida battalion, as early as April 12th reports that, after the successful affair with Prentiss, his battalion, with a portion of the brigade (Patton Anderson's) proceeded forward within range of the ones reports that the Twenty-fourth Ohio was landed at 5:30 P. M. and formed in line of battle on the river hill, (Ibid, page 339). General Hurlbut's report (April 12th) likewise serves to throw light upon the Federal and Confederate situation after the capture of Prentiss, and he was forced back to the river: On reaching the 2
ggles and reported myself to him. He invited me to remain with him, as the action was drawing to a close. The enemy having retired and left us in possession of the field, and being unable to find more than fifty of my command, I, with my adjutant (also wounded), retired with this small force to the ambulance depot to assist the wounded, and retired for the night. —(Ibid, page 506). Colonel W. A. Stanley (Ninth Texas), of the same brigade and division of Bragg's corps, reported on the 15th of April: In the meantime firing continued incessantly on our right; we were then ordered to join the command in that direction, which was reported to have the enemy badly routed and driving them toward their gunboats. After proceeding some distance we found ourselves in the range of shot and shell fired from the boats and vicinity. At this point night put a close to the action of the day of the 6th. We retired from this point to form our encampment for the night, our troops being more o
X, Part I, page 434.) Again, Colonel A. W. Campbell, commander of the Thirty-third Tennessee, of the same division (Stewart's), as may be seen, having expended the ammunition of the right wing of his regiment, he halted it until ammunition could be procured, which detained them for some time, after which, advancing toward the river until night, we returned to the cross-roads and bivouacked near the cross-roads. (Ibid, page 435.) And now I have to quote the report of General Cheatham, dated April 30, which is wholly irreconcilable with and subversive of the story of the Lost Opportunity: Broken and routed he (enemy) apparently, from all directions, seemed flying toward the river, and our own forces as generally closing upon him. * * * * With the balance of my command I pressed forward and joined Colonel Maney, who had now become my advance, and had in pursuit captured and sent to the rear many of the enemy. About this time a halt was made for the purpose of some concentration of our
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