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E. P. Alexander (search for this): chapter 1.34
ith headless ranks. What can they do? Or how Withstand his wide destroying sword? And now, in conclusion, I challenge those who have brought on this discussion to make up the issue tangibly as one purely of historical and military import and concern—that is, divested of all family vanities and personal ambitions, for submission, in effect, to the judicial decision of a few such men as Judge Campbell, Secretary Lamar, Senators Vance, Pugh, Colquitt and Eustis, Governor Haygood, General E. P. Alexander, or many score of such other gentlemen of the South whom I could name as capable of deciding according to the clear documentary evidence. But let the issue be made so broad as to embrace several subjects which have not been touched upon in my papers. For example to begin with, Was the military situation on the part of the Confederates in the department under the command of General A. S. Johnston such as to make the loss of Fort Donelson an inevitable result? Or, in other words, w
Albert Sydney Johnston (search for this): chapter 1.34
which can be said to run counter to the unbroken chain of documentary proof which I have adduced. Into the discussion of the further matters relating to General A. S. Johnston's connection with the campaign and battle of Shiloh, asserted and reasserted by his son (Colonel Johnston) so persistently, it is not my purpose to follow him, unless made unavoidable hereafter. I will say, however, that it were very easy to demonstrate that his story—that in the month of January, 1862, General A. S. Johnston had in his possession a map with Shiloh church marked upon it by the engineers, and had pointed out to Colonel Bowen that there the great battle of the southn touched upon in my papers. For example to begin with, Was the military situation on the part of the Confederates in the department under the command of General A. S. Johnston such as to make the loss of Fort Donelson an inevitable result? Or, in other words, was it not in the power of General Johnston, in February, 1862, with
hnston) so persistently, it is not my purpose to follow him, unless made unavoidable hereafter. I will say, however, that it were very easy to demonstrate that his story—that in the month of January, 1862, General A. S. Johnston had in his possession a map with Shiloh church marked upon it by the engineers, and had pointed out to Colonel Bowen that there the great battle of the southwest will be fought—is not one whit more historical or less imaginary than the ancient fable of the voyage of Arion to Parnassus on the back of a music-loving dolphin. I may also say that Colonel Johnston seems to aim to present his father as exercising a brawny physical power and influence upon the battle of Shiloh, not unlike that ascribed to Marlborough at the battle of Blenheim, by the English poetaster, Philips, in these lines: Churchell viewing where The violence of Tallard most prevailed, Come to oppose his slaughtering arms. With speed Precipitate he rode, urging his way O'er hills of gaspi
Archer Anderson (search for this): chapter 1.34
pture of Prentiss, reports: Subsequently (to Prentiss' surrender), while advancing towards the river, I received instructions from General Bragg to carry forward all the troops I could find. I received from Colonel Augustin notice of General Beauregard's orders to withdraw from the further pursuit, and finding soon afterwards that the forces were falling back, I retired with them, just as night set in, to the open field in the rear, and as 1 received no further orders, I directed General Anderson and Colonel Gibson to hold their troops in readiness, with their arms cleaned, and cartridges supplied for service the next day. —(Ibid, page 472 ) General Patton Anderson thus describes the situation with his brigade: The sun was now near the western horizon, the battle around us had ceased to rage. I met General Ruggles, who directed me to take a road which was not far to my left, and to move down it in the direction of the river. I had not proceeded far, when overtaking me
B. F. Cheatham (search for this): chapter 1.34
ops with him—now united with those of Generals Bragg and Breckinridge, as also Cheatham, with one brigade of his own (Polk's) corps—could possibly be ready to advance details to proceed to the enemy's camp and supply them. This being done, General Cheatham directed a line to be formed in rear of the encampment and await further o on our right, and I was ordered to support it. I did so, where I met with General Cheatham, who ordered me to remain where I was until further orders. Here I receiv the cross-roads. (Ibid, page 435.) And now I have to quote the report of General Cheatham, dated April 30, which is wholly irreconcilable with and subversive of the0.) It goes without saying that all the reports of his officers confirm General Cheatham's lucid explanation of the last hour of the 6th of April, but I will only cite the following from Colonel George Maney, commanding one of Cheatham's brigades: During a constant press forward, the best means of securing the advantage a<
t. (Ibid, page 593). Here, as we see, were two lines of Confederate troops, not about to rush upon and capture the enemy, but inert when the order to fall back for the night reached them! Unhappily, General Breckinridge made no report. But Colonel Trabue, one of his brigade commanders, has given a very full narrative of his most effective operations during the day, from which I had occasion to quote in the third paper of this series, and from which it is to be seen that, after halting to allod Bowen's brigades, was occupying the front line, being on the crest of the hill (or high land), overlooking the narrow valley of the Tennessee river, on which and near by was Pittsburg Landing. Having been halted here for more than an hour, says Trabue, we endured a most terrific cannonade and shelling from the gunboats. * * * From this position, when it was nearly dusk, we were ordered to the rear to encamp, which movement was effected in good order * * * in darkness of the night. (Ibid, page
ervice that day, especially in the capture of Prentiss, reports: Subsequently (to Prentiss' su direction of the river (after the capture of Prentiss). That night we slept in the enemy's tents, wenemy were driven from this stronghold (which Prentiss and Wallace had held), we, with several brigaeports that, after the successful affair with Prentiss, his battalion, with a portion of the brigadeking part in the successful operation against Prentiss, General Anderson, his brigade commander, camIbid, page 324). Further, and finally, General Prentiss in his report fixes the hour when he surris refers to the attack upon and surrender of Prentiss, which Prentiss himself reports took place atPrentiss himself reports took place at 5:30 P. M. The details which General Polk describes as incident to that surrender, including the ar How little prepared, after the surrender of Prentiss, three of his regiments, the Twelfth, Thirteeed, I made but a short halt (after capture of Prentiss) in the position from which the enemy had bee[8 more...]
G. T. Beauregard (search for this): chapter 1.34
ly in due official course been handed to General Beauregard, all the same the sub-reports of all theorder was announced to me as coming from General Beauregard, and was promptly communicated to my comreceived from Colonel Augustin notice of General Beauregard's orders to withdraw from the further pu said about it. (Military Operations of General Beauregard, by Colonel Roman, page 535.) Captain Cd, can you conduct me to the place where General Beauregard is at present? I replied in the affirma) attention to the fact that he was in your (Beauregard's) presence. It was quite dark, and he was hnston, the command having devolved upon General Beauregard, the conflict was continued until near s by the capture of Grant's army, * * but for Beauregard's order of withdrawal, late as it was when tbout the middle of May up to the very eve of Beauregard's separation from the army. But for this cature to follow. —(Military Operations of General Beauregard, Volume I, page 551). My summary of s[12 more...
Daniel Ruggles (search for this): chapter 1.34
erent with the other division of Bragg's corps, for Ruggles who commanded it, and who did splendid service thatthe battle around us had ceased to rage. I met General Ruggles, who directed me to take a road which was not forming. The enemy's gunboats now opened fire. General Ruggles directed me to move forward a short distance, an some ten or fifteen minutes, when one of General Ruggles's staff directed me to retire to the enemy's camp btowards the river. I was given command by Brigadier-General Ruggles to retire my command from the fire of the s for Colonel Pond, commanding the Third brigade of Ruggles's division of Bragg's corps, touching his operationhe field in search of my command. Fell in with General Ruggles and reported myself to him. He invited me to res that he found Bragg in a slight ravine in rear of Ruggles's division, accompanied by his staff and escort. * tired from some portion of his line of battle. General Ruggles himself was immediately at hand. * * * I am con
Malplaquet Marlborough (search for this): chapter 1.34
possession a map with Shiloh church marked upon it by the engineers, and had pointed out to Colonel Bowen that there the great battle of the southwest will be fought—is not one whit more historical or less imaginary than the ancient fable of the voyage of Arion to Parnassus on the back of a music-loving dolphin. I may also say that Colonel Johnston seems to aim to present his father as exercising a brawny physical power and influence upon the battle of Shiloh, not unlike that ascribed to Marlborough at the battle of Blenheim, by the English poetaster, Philips, in these lines: Churchell viewing where The violence of Tallard most prevailed, Come to oppose his slaughtering arms. With speed Precipitate he rode, urging his way O'er hills of gasping heroes and fallen steeds Rolling in death. Destruction, grim with blood, Attends his furious course. Around his head The glowing balls play innocent, while he, With due impetuous sway, deals fatal blows Among the flying Gauls. In Galli
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