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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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P. R. Cleburne (search for this): chapter 1.34
eckinridge's reserve division. Of his subordinates, who were in that quarter of the field where Hardee was personally present (the Confederate left), Brigadier-General Cleburne, as distinguished subsequently for soldierly ability as for personal intrepidity, reports that after having exhausted his ammunition and been obliged tog ceased, he again advanced until halted by an aid from General Beauregard, who informed him that he was not to approach nearer the river. It was now dark, says Cleburne, so I returned and encamped near the Bark road. Every fifteen minutes the enemy threw two shells from his gunboats, some of which bursted close among my men. (Ibid, page 582). I may also add that from about two thousand seven hundred officers and men on the morning of the 6th of April, Cleburne found his brigade muster but eight hundred on the morning of the 7th. (Ibid, page 582). Brigadier-General Wood, who commanded Hardee's third brigade, says that under orders from General Hardee t
Braxton Bragg (search for this): chapter 1.34
s dated six days after the battle, and of whom Bragg found it pertinent to say that while he could ously with this order to retire out of action, Bragg having placed him in command of all the troopsth Texas), of the same brigade and division of Bragg's corps, reported on the 15th of April: tle was over, Dr. Nott added that, when beside Bragg on horseback at the close of the day, he heardd that his impression at the time was that General Bragg gave the order of his own responsibility. ived it, without one syllable of comment. He (Bragg) transmitted the same to his division commandew. * * I perfectly recollect walking with him (Bragg), after dismounting, to the spot where you were, and calling his (Bragg's) attention to the fact that he was in your (Beauregard's) presence. It near night, I fell back, by an order from General Bragg, to the first encampment in the tents furtwould have reached my office—at least those of Bragg and Hardee—essentially free from, or not stuff[29 more...]<
nt my aid to establish the light artillery, all that could be found on my left, * * * many gallant soldiers and brave officers rallied steadily on the new line. * * * In a short time the enemy appeared on the crest of the ridge, led by the Eighteenth Louisiana, but were cut to pieces by the murderous and steady fire of our artillery. Dr. Cornyn again took charge of one of the heavy 24-pounders, and the fire of that gun was the one on which the fire of the other pieces concentrated. * * * Captain Gwin, United States Navy, had called on me, by one of his officers, to mark the place the gunboats might open fire. I advised him to take a position on the left of my camp ground and open fire as soon as our fire was within that line. He did so. * * * And his fire was most effective in stopping the advance of the enemy on Sunday afternoon and night. About dusk the firing ceased. (Ibid, page 205.) All the sub-reports of the officers of his division confirm this statement, that the contest o
of April, states: It was late in the afternoon when the enemy was repulsed, and was followed in the direction of the river (after the capture of Prentiss). That night we slept in the enemy's tents, worn with fatigue, decimated in numbers, but elated that such a hard-fought day had such a glorious close. —(Ibid, page 488.) Evidently Colonel Fagan had not heard of the Lost opportunity when he wrote, nor had Colonel H. W. Allen at the date of his report of April 10th, neither had Captain Dubroca (of the Thirteenth Louisiana), who commanded the regiment at the close of the action. Colonel Hodge, of the Nineteenth Louisiana (Gibson's brigade), is thus specific as to the lateness of the hour: After the enemy were driven from this stronghold (which Prentiss and Wallace had held), we, with several brigades, moved towards the river. It was then nigh sunset. In accordance with your order (Gibson's) we commenced falling back about dusk, and being separated from the brigade, I
A. J. Vaughan (search for this): chapter 1.34
n I had on the extreme (Confederate) left, where I remained (unengaged evidently) until the fighting of the day had ceased; after which I started back to find our hospital, hoping there to find the majority, if not all, of our regiment assembled. —(Ibid, page 427.) He did not find it, however, in the night, and was able next morning only to assemble some sixty-odd of his men. Lieutenant-Colonel J. H. Bell (Ibid, page 423) confirms Colonel Russell's report, just cited, as also does Colonel A. J. Vaughan, Thirteenth Tennessee, in these terms: At this time heavy firing commenced on our right, and I was ordered to support it. I did so, where I met with General Cheatham, who ordered me to remain where I was until further orders. Here I received an order from Colonel Russell to fall back to the rear of his regiment (Twelfth Tennessee), and proceed down the river until we came under the fire of the enemy's gunboats. It being now about dark, I was ordered back to an encampment, whe
J. G. Martin (search for this): chapter 1.34
And just here it is noteworthy, that Withers did not lodge that night with the troops of his own division, but with Colonel Martin, of Breckinridge's division, from which the charitable deduction is, that he was unable to find his own troops; for, ood, and that his own corps was so utterly out of his own hands, that he had to seek that night a sleeping place with Colonel Martin, of Breckinridge's reserve division. Of his subordinates, who were in that quarter of the field where Hardee was pd to the rear to encamp, which movement was effected in good order * * * in darkness of the night. (Ibid, page 616). Colonel Martin, who commanded Breckinridge's second brigade, after Bowen was wounded, also reports that when within from three hundrosition we received orders to fall back to a safe position and await further orders. By this time night came on. Colonel Martin withdrew, * * this closed the fighting of the 6th of April, he stated, adding that the loss of the regiment was abou
F. C. Jones (search for this): chapter 1.34
rrender his forces at this point until 6 P. M. Colonel Grose, of the Thirty-sixth Indiana, also reports, on the 8th of April, that the firing continued until near dusk, (Ibid, page 337); while Lieutenant-Colonel Nicholas L. Anderson, Sixth Ohio, reports that his regiment was disembarked at about five o'clock on the evening of the 6th of April, and marched up the hill as quietly as possible, and that under Ammen's orders it was placed in support of a battery, (Ibid, page 339). Further, Colonel F. C. Jones reports that the Twenty-fourth Ohio was landed at 5:30 P. M. and formed in line of battle on the river hill, (Ibid, page 339). General Hurlbut's report (April 12th) likewise serves to throw light upon the Federal and Confederate situation after the capture of Prentiss, and he was forced back to the river: On reaching the 24-pound siege guns in battery, he states, I again succeeded in forming line of battle in rear of the guns, and by direction of Major-General Grant I assumed comma
David Urquhart (search for this): chapter 1.34
tion. I held the position at which I had been halted until dark, the enemy all the while keeping up an active shelling from his gunboats, which proved, however, more noisy than destructive. At dark, finding our troops generally retiring, and understanding it was the order for all to do so, I withdrew my command for the night, and this ended their part in the battle of Sunday. —(Ibid, page 455). I will close this part of the issue raised with Colonel Johnston, by the statement of Colonel David Urquhart, of the staff of General Bragg, of August 2d, 1880, in answer to a letter from me that after leaving me he rejoined General Bragg: Who I found engaged with the Federal troops, who were now disputing every inch. At about sunset an order came from General Beauregard to withdraw, collect and reorganize the troops, all of whom had become greatly broken and intermixed. * * * At the time this order was given, the plain truth must be told, that our troops at the front were a thin li
Nicholas L. Anderson (search for this): chapter 1.34
e 324). Further, and finally, General Prentiss in his report fixes the hour when he surrendered, after one of the most resolute, obstinate defenses of an untrenched position that was made during the whole war, namely, at 5:30 P. M., while Colonel Gedde, of the Eighth Iowa, did not surrender his forces at this point until 6 P. M. Colonel Grose, of the Thirty-sixth Indiana, also reports, on the 8th of April, that the firing continued until near dusk, (Ibid, page 337); while Lieutenant-Colonel Nicholas L. Anderson, Sixth Ohio, reports that his regiment was disembarked at about five o'clock on the evening of the 6th of April, and marched up the hill as quietly as possible, and that under Ammen's orders it was placed in support of a battery, (Ibid, page 339). Further, Colonel F. C. Jones reports that the Twenty-fourth Ohio was landed at 5:30 P. M. and formed in line of battle on the river hill, (Ibid, page 339). General Hurlbut's report (April 12th) likewise serves to throw light upo
Broken regiments and disordered battalions came into line gradually upon my division. Major Cavender posted six of his 20-pound pieces on my right, and I sent my aid to establish the light artillery, all that could be found on my left, * * * many gallant soldiers and brave officers rallied steadily on the new line. * * * In a short time the enemy appeared on the crest of the ridge, led by the Eighteenth Louisiana, but were cut to pieces by the murderous and steady fire of our artillery. Dr. Cornyn again took charge of one of the heavy 24-pounders, and the fire of that gun was the one on which the fire of the other pieces concentrated. * * * Captain Gwin, United States Navy, had called on me, by one of his officers, to mark the place the gunboats might open fire. I advised him to take a position on the left of my camp ground and open fire as soon as our fire was within that line. He did so. * * * And his fire was most effective in stopping the advance of the enemy on Sunday afterno
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