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es and three of his regiments in an oblique column instead of line of battle, and the fire became so destructive that the troops recoiled under it. (Hurlbut's division, see Rebellion Records, Volume X, Part I, page 205.) The Eighteenth Louisiana (Monton's) suffered severely in this charge, also the Orleans Guards; the Sixteenth Louisiana less than either, being on the right, and consequently in what might be called the rear of the column. As my troops were advancing to this charge, we again reced that the Eighteenth Louisiana lost two hundred and seven officers and men either killed or wounded in this ill-judged charge. This brigade was not in the quarter of the field with General Bragg, and I refer to the reports of Colonel Pond, Colonel Monton, Major Gober (Sixteenth Louisiana), Colonel Marshall J. Smith and Colonel Looney, Thirty-eighth Tennessee, chiefly to show that no order reached them to retire, and that, up to the very edge of night, they were being employed on the Confedera
Randall Lee Gibson (search for this): chapter 1.34
open field in the rear, and as 1 received no further orders, I directed General Anderson and Colonel Gibson to hold their troops in readiness, with their arms cleaned, and cartridges supplied for servhereabouts of the whole command was ascertained before we slept. —(Ibid, page 499.) Colonel Randall Lee Gibson is very meagre in his report as to what his brigade did after 3 P. M.; but here is ally orders of General Hardee in desultory, resultless, though bloody conflicts. Colonel Fagan, of Gibson's brigade, writing as early as the 9th of April, states: It was late in the afternoon when commanded the regiment at the close of the action. Colonel Hodge, of the Nineteenth Louisiana (Gibson's brigade), is thus specific as to the lateness of the hour: After the enemy were driven fral brigades, moved towards the river. It was then nigh sunset. In accordance with your order (Gibson's) we commenced falling back about dusk, and being separated from the brigade, I conducted the r
artillery which Webster had improvised, and which Buell had so opportunely supported with Ammen's fresh brigade. Nor was it materially different with the other division of Bragg's corps, for Ruggles who commanded it, and who did splendid service that day, especially in the capture of Prentiss, reports: Subsequently (to Prentiss' surrender), while advancing towards the river, I received instructions from General Bragg to carry forward all the troops I could find. I received from Colonel Augustin notice of General Beauregard's orders to withdraw from the further pursuit, and finding soon afterwards that the forces were falling back, I retired with them, just as night set in, to the open field in the rear, and as 1 received no further orders, I directed General Anderson and Colonel Gibson to hold their troops in readiness, with their arms cleaned, and cartridges supplied for service the next day. —(Ibid, page 472 ) General Patton Anderson thus describes the situation with his
ng my men. (Ibid, page 582). I may also add that from about two thousand seven hundred officers and men on the morning of the 6th of April, Cleburne found his brigade muster but eight hundred on the morning of the 7th. (Ibid, page 582). Brigadier-General Wood, who commanded Hardee's third brigade, says that under orders from General Hardee to move to the centre and front, he took his troops under and beyond the shells of the gunboats, until, coming on a line of troops (Confederates) in his front, he halted and ordered the men to rest, selecting a position the most secure from the shelling. From the shells, however, at this point he lost ten killed and wounded. In a short time I saw, says General Wood, the line on my front moving to the rear around my right. A staff-officer then ordered me to fall back to the encampment we had last passed, and to allow my men to get something to eat and rest for the night. (Ibid, page 593). Here, as we see, were two lines of Confederate troops, no<
A. W. Campbell (search for this): chapter 1.34
s so severe as to be unbearable, killing and wounding several of (his) men, whereupon he retired to a ravine and remained until dusk, and then moved back and encamped for the night. (Rebellion Records, Volume X, Part I, page 434.) Again, Colonel A. W. Campbell, commander of the Thirty-third Tennessee, of the same division (Stewart's), as may be seen, having expended the ammunition of the right wing of his regiment, he halted it until ammunition could be procured, which detained them for some tihis discussion to make up the issue tangibly as one purely of historical and military import and concern—that is, divested of all family vanities and personal ambitions, for submission, in effect, to the judicial decision of a few such men as Judge Campbell, Secretary Lamar, Senators Vance, Pugh, Colquitt and Eustis, Governor Haygood, General E. P. Alexander, or many score of such other gentlemen of the South whom I could name as capable of deciding according to the clear documentary evidence.
Rebellion Records (search for this): chapter 1.34
ther troops during the Monday's battle.—(Rebellion Records, Volume X, Part I, page 555.) Coloneling had anything to eat since morning. —(Rebellion Records, Volume X, Part I, page 438.) Now, asurther back, where we spent the night. —(Rebellion Records, Volume X, Part I, page 546.) Colonelame on and we were ordered to the rear. (Rebellion Records, Volume X, Part I, page 559). Colonel Jooiled under it. (Hurlbut's division, see Rebellion Records, Volume X, Part I, page 205.) The Eighteour headquarters, but unable to do so. —(Rebellion Records, Volume X, Part I, page 493.) Captainpe of the ground and were destructive. —(Rebellion Records, Volume X, Part 1, pages 333-34). Thef the enemy, or shelter in the forest. —(Rebellion Records, Volume X, Part I, pages 569, 570). Tk. The resistance was sharp but short. (Rebellion Records, Volume X, pages 1 and 409.) This refersmoved back and encamped for the night. (Rebellion Records, Volume X, Part I, pa
John C. Moore (search for this): chapter 1.34
s halted (by whose orders he does not report) within four hundred yards of the river and remained ready to move forward for half an hour, when night came on and we were ordered to the rear. (Rebellion Records, Volume X, Part I, page 559). Colonel John C. Moore, commanding Second regiment of Texas infantry, under date of April 19th, 1862, reports to General Withers: After advancing about half a mile we came to a deep ravine and formed ourselves in front of a heavy battery of the enemy at tdid not return, and is supposed to have been taken prisoner. —(Ibid, page 562.) The foregoing statements, especially of the three brigade commanders, Chalmers, Jackson, and Deas, as well as of Colonel Wheeler (a graduate of West Point) and Colonel Moore, certainly give such a picture of the condition of their several brigades and regiments that, had General Withers been brought before a court-martial for the statement in his official report, made on the 20th of June, 1862, which we shall cit
ne hundred yards to the left of the road, which was done as soon as the line could be formed, probably three or four minutes, Generals Buell and Nelson, assisting. The Thirty-Sixth Indiana, and part of the Sixth Ohio volunteer infantry, were placed in position behind the crest of the hill, near the battery, the left protected by a deep ravine parallel to the river and having water in it. General Buell himself, who had reached Pittsburg Landing ahead of Ammen, with his Chief of Staff, Colonel Fry, reports on the 15th of April, 1862: It (Ammen's brigade) was immediately posted to meet the attack at that point and, with a battery of artillery which happened to be on the ground and was brought into action, opened fire upon the enemy and repulsed him. The action of the gunboats also contributed very much to that result. The attack upon that point was not renewed, night having come on, and the fire ceased on both sides. —(Ibid, C. 299). The right about three hundred yards
battle, and the fire became so destructive that the troops recoiled under it. (Hurlbut's division, see Rebellion Records, Volume X, Part I, page 205.) The Eighteenth guns, supported by Ammen's brigade of Buell's army, as also by the remains of Hurlbut's, Stuart's and W. H. Wallace's brigades, and certain other fragmentary commanP. M. and formed in line of battle on the river hill, (Ibid, page 339). General Hurlbut's report (April 12th) likewise serves to throw light upon the Federal and o move forward until checked by a heavy fire from the enemy's field artillery (Hurlbut's and McClernard's troops, as may be seen) and gunboats. When this firing cearegiments continued my advance as rapidly in the direction of his flight. He (Hurlbut) made no rally before my command, * * and I was halted near, for the purpose, ble Federal defensive resources at the time, to be found in the reports of Generals Hurlbut and McClernand. Any student of history, or soldier, who may follow the sa
onsiderably in advance of our general front, and so fell back without orders, be it noted, from his corps commander, and slept within a mile of the river, and four hundred yards of the Federal line.—(Ibid, page 58.) It is to be noted that the Eighteenth Louisiana lost two hundred and seven officers and men either killed or wounded in this ill-judged charge. This brigade was not in the quarter of the field with General Bragg, and I refer to the reports of Colonel Pond, Colonel Monton, Major Gober (Sixteenth Louisiana), Colonel Marshall J. Smith and Colonel Looney, Thirty-eighth Tennessee, chiefly to show that no order reached them to retire, and that, up to the very edge of night, they were being employed on the Confederate left by orders of General Hardee in desultory, resultless, though bloody conflicts. Colonel Fagan, of Gibson's brigade, writing as early as the 9th of April, states: It was late in the afternoon when the enemy was repulsed, and was followed in the direct
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