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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.34
grounds for General Polk's belief that his troops were capable of the vigorous assault that was essential to make the Confederate operations at that late hour a triumphant success. General A. P. Stewart, a professionally educated soldier, who fell into command of Polk's first division by the disablement of General Clark, reports that after the capture of Prentiss, in which his immediate command had no part, under the orders of General Polk, he moved toward our left to the support of some Louisiana regiments (with the Second and Thirty-third and Fifth Tennessee regiments.) In passing through the woods, Stewart continued, the Fifth Tennessee became separated from us. The other two moved forward to a road, and thence by the left flank along the road to the camp where prisoners were captured. We finally took position, under the orders of General Breckinridge, to aid in the pursuit of the enemy, which was checked by the fire of the gunboats! Nothing here assuredly indicated the e
Pittsburgh (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.34
r the battle, is equally specific upon all the points involved in this passage of his report: My brigade was ordered to change direction again, face toward Pittsburg, where the enemy appeared to have made his last stand, and to advance upon him, General Chalmers's brigade being again on my right. * * * * Without ammunition anat a right angle to the road, and commenced forming line of battle in an open field and woods beyond. Several batteries passed down the road in the direction of Pittsburg. One soon returned, and filed off into the field where the infantry was forming. The enemy's gunboats now opened fire. General Ruggles directed me to move for, the command having devolved upon General Beauregard, the conflict was continued until near sunset, and the advance divisions were within a few hundred yards of Pittsburg, where the enemy huddled in confusion, when the order to withdraw was received. The troops were ordered to bivouac on the field of battle. Exhausted by fasting
Bark (Wisconsin, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.34
ts that after having exhausted his ammunition and been obliged to replenish it after much delay, he again advanced and continued to move forward until checked by a heavy fire from the enemy's field artillery (Hurlbut's and McClernard's troops, as may be seen) and gunboats. When this firing ceased, he again advanced until halted by an aid from General Beauregard, who informed him that he was not to approach nearer the river. It was now dark, says Cleburne, so I returned and encamped near the Bark road. Every fifteen minutes the enemy threw two shells from his gunboats, some of which bursted close among my men. (Ibid, page 582). I may also add that from about two thousand seven hundred officers and men on the morning of the 6th of April, Cleburne found his brigade muster but eight hundred on the morning of the 7th. (Ibid, page 582). Brigadier-General Wood, who commanded Hardee's third brigade, says that under orders from General Hardee to move to the centre and front, he took his tr
Pittsburg Landing (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.34
protected by a deep ravine parallel to the river and having water in it. General Buell himself, who had reached Pittsburg Landing ahead of Ammen, with his Chief of Staff, Colonel Fry, reports on the 15th of April, 1862: It (Ammen's brigadeve. —(Rebellion Records, Volume X, Part 1, pages 333-34). The hour that Ammen's brigade marched up the hill from Pittsburg Landing, and the lateness of the repulse, is thus reported by General Nelson as early as April 10th: At 5 P. M. the head of my column marched up the bank at Pittsburg Landing, and took up its position in the road under fire of the Rebel artillery, so close had they approached the landing. I found a semi-circle of artillery, totally unsupported by infantry, whose he crest of the hill (or high land), overlooking the narrow valley of the Tennessee river, on which and near by was Pittsburg Landing. Having been halted here for more than an hour, says Trabue, we endured a most terrific cannonade and shelling from
Shiloh Church (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.34
en chain of documentary proof which I have adduced. Into the discussion of the further matters relating to General A. S. Johnston's connection with the campaign and battle of Shiloh, asserted and reasserted by his son (Colonel Johnston) so persistently, it is not my purpose to follow him, unless made unavoidable hereafter. I will say, however, that it were very easy to demonstrate that his story—that in the month of January, 1862, General A. S. Johnston had in his possession a map with Shiloh church marked upon it by the engineers, and had pointed out to Colonel Bowen that there the great battle of the southwest will be fought—is not one whit more historical or less imaginary than the ancient fable of the voyage of Arion to Parnassus on the back of a music-loving dolphin. I may also say that Colonel Johnston seems to aim to present his father as exercising a brawny physical power and influence upon the battle of Shiloh, not unlike that ascribed to Marlborough at the battle of Blenh
Fort Donelson (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.34
e several subjects which have not been touched upon in my papers. For example to begin with, Was the military situation on the part of the Confederates in the department under the command of General A. S. Johnston such as to make the loss of Fort Donelson an inevitable result? Or, in other words, was it not in the power of General Johnston, in February, 1862, with the resources of men and transportation at his position, immediately after General Grant invested Fort Henry, to have readily concentrated upon and overcome him with a decisively superior force? Or, in fact, did not the failure on the part of General Johnston to essay such an enterprise, as early as the 7th of February, 1862, cause the loss of Fort Donelson from the outset with the ten thousand troops sent thither after the capture of Fort Henry, and thus make the immediate abandonment of Bowling Green and Columbus absolutely a necessary consequence, with the early abandonment also of Nashville and Middle Tennessee? Let
Thomas J. Freeman (search for this): chapter 1.34
ficial military literature. How little prepared, after the surrender of Prentiss, three of his regiments, the Twelfth, Thirteenth and Twenty-second Tennessee regiments of Stewart's division, were to vigorously assail the enemy in the manner so sanguinely fancied by General Polk, is shown by Colonel Russell, their brigade commander, in these definitive words: The prisoners being disposed of, I made preparations to move the forces under my command forward toward the river, but Colonel Freeman (Twenty-second) reported his regiment out of ammunition. The Twelfth and Thirteenth regiments coming up at this time, being in the same condition, I ordered details to proceed to the enemy's camp and supply them. This being done, General Cheatham directed a line to be formed in rear of the encampment and await further orders. The gunboats kept up an incessant fire of shot and shell. After waiting in this position some time, orders were received from General Bragg to fall back out of the
J. R. Chalmers (search for this): chapter 1.34
at had every prospect of success, but which was stopped by an order from General Beauregard to withdraw the forces beyond the enemy's fire. Beginning with General Chalmers, whose report is dated six days after the battle, and of whom Bragg found it pertinent to say that while he could not exceed the measure of my expectations * My brigade was ordered to change direction again, face toward Pittsburg, where the enemy appeared to have made his last stand, and to advance upon him, General Chalmers's brigade being again on my right. * * * * Without ammunition and with only their bayonets to rely on, steadily my men advanced under a heavy fire from lightamp. He did not return, and is supposed to have been taken prisoner. —(Ibid, page 562.) The foregoing statements, especially of the three brigade commanders, Chalmers, Jackson, and Deas, as well as of Colonel Wheeler (a graduate of West Point) and Colonel Moore, certainly give such a picture of the condition of their several b
A. S. Johnston (search for this): chapter 1.34
g to General A. S. Johnston's connection with the campaign and battle of Shiloh, asserted and reasserted by his son (Colonel Johnston) so persistently, it is not my purpose to follow him, unless made unavoidable hereafter. I will say, however, that an the ancient fable of the voyage of Arion to Parnassus on the back of a music-loving dolphin. I may also say that Colonel Johnston seems to aim to present his father as exercising a brawny physical power and influence upon the battle of Shiloh, noston such as to make the loss of Fort Donelson an inevitable result? Or, in other words, was it not in the power of General Johnston, in February, 1862, with the resources of men and transportation at his position, immediately after General Grant inoncentrated upon and overcome him with a decisively superior force? Or, in fact, did not the failure on the part of General Johnston to essay such an enterprise, as early as the 7th of February, 1862, cause the loss of Fort Donelson from the outset
nd strews the ground With headless ranks. What can they do? Or how Withstand his wide destroying sword? And now, in conclusion, I challenge those who have brought on this discussion to make up the issue tangibly as one purely of historical and military import and concern—that is, divested of all family vanities and personal ambitions, for submission, in effect, to the judicial decision of a few such men as Judge Campbell, Secretary Lamar, Senators Vance, Pugh, Colquitt and Eustis, Governor Haygood, General E. P. Alexander, or many score of such other gentlemen of the South whom I could name as capable of deciding according to the clear documentary evidence. But let the issue be made so broad as to embrace several subjects which have not been touched upon in my papers. For example to begin with, Was the military situation on the part of the Confederates in the department under the command of General A. S. Johnston such as to make the loss of Fort Donelson an inevitable result?
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