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North America (search for this): chapter 10
tary of Virginia in 1626. This statement is inexact. The family deduces from Richard Clyborne, of County Westmorland, and his wife, Emma, daughter and co-heiress of George Kirkbred, of County Northumberland, England (Circa, 1530). The name has been variously spelled Clyborne, Cleyborne, Cleburne, Clayborne, Cleborne, Cliburne, Claiborne. The last form was that used by Colonel William Claiborne, Secretary of the Colony of Virginia, and the first man honored with the title of rebel in North America. General Cleburne was of the family of Colonel Claiborne, but not descended from him. The spelling Claiborne generally obtains in the United States, and the name has been distinguishedly represented. Dr. Christopher J. Cleborne, Surgeon and Medical Director United States Navy, a cousin in a remote degree of General Cleburne, is another highly worthy representative of the Irish branch of the family.—Ed. His mother was of the lineage of that Maurice Ronayne, who obtained from King Henry t
Jonesborough (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
and more prescient than the many who differed with them. Expediency suggested the policy he advised. General Cleburne was a division commander under General Joseph E. Johnston during his celebrated campaign in North Georgia, and distinguished himself in a number of its various battles, and more especially at New Hope church, where he repulsed the enemy with signal firmness and efficiency and with heavy losses to their charging columns. He commanded an army corps at the battle of Jonesboroa, Georgia, and covered the retreat of General Hood's defeated army from that field. He also commanded a corps at the battle of Franklin, Tennessee, where he was killed in storming the second line of the Federal works. Touching his action in this, his last charge, his last battle, I speak as a messenger from the field where he fell. This battle-ground lies in a beautiful valley and immediately south of the town of Franklin. About noon of November 30, 1864, the Confederate army under command
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ice (I was on the right), successfully broke the line and some of my brave and noble men were killed fifty paces or more within the works. But just at this critical juncture a reinforcement of a Federal brigade confronted them with a heavy fire, and being few in numbers they were driven back to the opposite side of the works, behind which they took position and bravely held the line they had previously taken. Night soon intervening, the Federal army withdrew from the field and retired to Nashville. This was a gallant and glorious fight on the part of the Confederates, but a sad disaster to their cause and their country. The intrepid Cleburne had fallen. Generals Granberry and Adams of his command, Generals Carter, Strahl and Gist of Cheatham's command and of the division of which my brigades composed a part, had also fallen, while hundreds of others, less notable but no less brave and self-sacrificing, had made their last charge and had fought their last battle. For reckless,
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
d army from that field. He also commanded a corps at the battle of Franklin, Tennessee, where he was killed in storming the second line of the Federal works. Toucng the march of the army on General Hood's ill-fated campaign from Georgia to Tennessee, some occasion at night had called together a large number of officers and soutiful spot, said to have been a favorite resort in his walks before the war. Tennessee, whose bosom received his blood, unites in honoring his memory to-day. Her ss contain high tributes to his name. A work, entitled the Military Annals of Tennessee, contains a chapter (written by Colonel C. W. Frazer, of that State, and who orian to give this dead hero a white stone. This book (The Military Annals of Tennessee) contains an excellent steel engraving of General Cleburne, and also a beautikind. For several days visitors have been coming from all parts of Arkansas, Tennessee, Mississippi, and Kentucky. The ladies of the Memorial Association, of Mem
Lookout Mountain, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ine began to recede, and later were driven to confusion. But the left center of the enemy still stood firm and fighting. Upon that fortified point the flower of the Confederate army, embracing Cleburne and his division, had been hurled and rehurled without success. Charge after charge had been made and repulsed, and it seemed that the position was not to be taken. But just as the sun, encrimsoned with the smoke of battle and like a great, bloody disk in the sky, was sinking beneath Lookout mountain, that towered upon our left, news was swiftly brought to our center that both wings of the enemy's line were in full retreat, and orders were given to charge again the Federal center. Quickly our shattered columns were rallied for the last grand struggle. The charge was sounded, and, with a shout that rent the heavens and an impetuosity that swept away all opposition, they dashed into the enemy's works and poured a volley into their flying forces. The battle was over, the victory won
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
, then, in behalf of the Memorial Association, in a brief address extended a hearty welcome to the visitors. Miss Eva Coolidge then sang, with touching effect, the sacred solo Cavalry. After benediction by Rev. Mr. Lockwood, the procession formed and proceeded to Evergreen cemetery, Judge R. W. Nicholls acting as marshal. The shaft erected to the memory of the heroic Cleburne stands in the centre of Confederate hill, the highest point on Crowley ridge, a range of hills that extend from Missouri to Southern Arkansas. Round about the monument lie the remains of more than four-score of the devoted followers of Cleburne. There also rests General Thomas C. Hindman, to whom it is the design of the ladies also to erect a fitting memorial. It is their aim, finally, to commemorate by massive monument, collectively, the humbler patriot of the ranks. The procession reaching Confederate hill, over which General John S. Marmaduke made his effective charge against the forces of General Pr
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ters in this idea were wiser and more prescient than the many who differed with them. Expediency suggested the policy he advised. General Cleburne was a division commander under General Joseph E. Johnston during his celebrated campaign in North Georgia, and distinguished himself in a number of its various battles, and more especially at New Hope church, where he repulsed the enemy with signal firmness and efficiency and with heavy losses to their charging columns. He commanded an army corpt improbable that he had predetermined to win a victory upon this field or die in the attempt. This hypothesis is supported by Hon. T. W. Brown, of Memphis, who relates that during the march of the army on General Hood's ill-fated campaign from Georgia to Tennessee, some occasion at night had called together a large number of officers and soldiers. Public speaking became the order of the evening, and General Cleburne was called on for a speech. He at first declined, for he was not a talking
that shaft but now gives visible expression to those cherished sentiments of remembrance and veneration which have ever since, and ever should animate the minds and hearts of a grateful people. General Cleburne was born in the county of Cork, Ireland, March 17, 1828, and was consequently in the thirty-seventh year of his age at the time of his death, and just in the full prime and pride of his glorious manhood. He was a descendant of William Cleyborne, the colonial secretary of Virginia in ity. Their joint emblems—a happy conception—fitly mark the monument that here speaks to posterity—Erin's harp in bed of shamrock; the Confederate seal, showing Washington on warhorse, wreathed in Southland's blooms and products; the sunburst of Ireland over the inscription Franklin, symbolizing that his life passed thence in an effulgence of glory. All the honors we can do him cannot equal his deserts. This beautiful monument, which love erects to memory and gratitude gives to glory, is but <
Memphis (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
riotic ladies of the Phillips County Memorial Association. The reverential occasion convened numerous gallant veterans from a distance, including many from Memphis, Tennessee. At 2:10 o'clock P. M., the services were opened in the Opera House by General James C. Tappan, master of ceremonies. An impressive prayer was offeredriver, the ceremonies were renewed with solemn prayer by Rev. Father P. F. O'Reilly. Miss Rosa Fink then recited a poem by Mrs. Virginia Frazer-Boyle, of Memphis, Tennessee, entitled The Death of Cleburne. Whilst the poem was being read the bunting which draped the monument was drawn aside by five young ladies, Misses Maude Sae merchant of Helena). At the conclusion of the reading of the poem, Major John J. Horner introduced as the orator of the day, General George W. Gordon, of Memphis, Tennessee. Address by General Gordon. General Gordon, after acknowledging the complimentary introduction, said: One of the noblest duties of the living is
Poland (Poland) (search for this): chapter 10
usion, while we would especially memorialize General Cleburne to-day, we cannot forget the thousands of our humbler comrades who also died valiantly for the country they loved. They, too, deserve our grateful remembrance, our peans of praise, our tributes of love. All grateful people have remembered and venerated their patriot dead. Erin, that little land that has given more than her share of genius and valor to the world, still honors the name of her martyred Emmet. Enslaved and unhappy Poland still breathes a sigh for her Poniatouski; Sparta, though dead, echoes from her tomb the name Leonidas. Buried Carthage consecrated her sepulcher with the dust of her patriots. And the South, God smile upon her, still remembers her martyred dead, and speaks of their deeds with veneration and pride. Peace to their shades, honor to their ashes! Numerous were the outbursts from his audience while touched upon the character of Cleburne, and the instances of the war which were deeply inscri
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