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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Augusta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
Sons of Confederate Veterans. an Address deliverd before the Confederate Survivors' Association in Augusta, Georgia, on the occasion of its Thirteenth annual reunion on Memorial day, April 27, 1891. by Col. Charles C. Jones, Jr., Ll. D. President of the Association. Prefatory note. The 27th of April having been set apart by the Confederate Survivor's Association of Augusta for a Reunion in honor of Lieutenant-General Wade Hampton and the members of his Old Brigade, and an elaborate proAugusta for a Reunion in honor of Lieutenant-General Wade Hampton and the members of his Old Brigade, and an elaborate programme having been arranged which included an oration from that distinguished Confederate chieftain, a collation for more than twelve hundred, responses from prominent officers and invited guests to sentiments appropriate to the memorial occasion, and other ceremonies, the President of this Association, in deference to the unusual attractions of the day, curtailed his annual address of its customary proportions. The Address. Ten times since our last annual convocation has Death's pale fla
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
on around thirteen hundred men; old Jeb Stuart rushed on, and terrible was the story to tell. Think of Robert E. Lee with one division playing against the whole Federal army, and you will know something of this great military feat. Lee was a great man, truly great, modest, unassuming, noble, brave; but I cannot pause to tell the story of his life; it would need greater eloquence than mine—that man without a peer. They call Kentucky the dark and bloody ground; but, my comrades, old Northern Virginia is dark and bloody ground. All her soil has been consecrated. That modest gentleman here (pointing to General Hunton) gave those fellows a trip across the Potomac near Leesburg. That night-hawk, Mosby, swept around, startling whole regiments with his little band of gallant followers. Near here fell John Q. Marr, among the first who bit the dust. Terrible, indeed, as this has been to us of the South, out of it has come good; as the war brought out and developed the manhood of her p
Mexico (Mexico) (search for this): chapter 3
nt of stores and residences, and the greatest enthusiasm was manifested. Confederate, State, and national colors were seen on every side, and one of the features of the observance was the great number of ladies who participated. The parade. The column was formed on Bollingbrook street, facing south, with the right resting between Second and Third streets. Ex-Governor William E. Cameron was the chief marshal, and he was assisted by a number of deputies. In the line of the parade were Mexican veterans bearing with them the flag which they carried to Mexico, the Petersburg Grays, the Petersburg Artillery, the Prince George Cavairy, A. P. Hill Camp, Confederate States Veterans, the police corps, veterans, members A. P. Hill Camp, the fire department, public-school pupils, and many others who took part in the parade to testify their respect for the man and the day, including the three councils of the Junior Order of American Mechanics. There were two bands in line—one of the Gray
Hertford, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
as at the Meherrin, and had to cross in a small boat ourselves, and swim our horses. Here a bit of good luck befell us—not much, but we were thankful for small favors. We met with a gentleman who had a sulky which he wanted to get to the town (Hertford) in which I lived. It must be borne in mind we were not cavalrymen, and yet we had been in the saddle seven or eight days, on the go all the time, were completely worn out, and had still before us about sixty miles to travel before reaching out me when I was several miles from home. He was hardly out of sight, when I heard in the direction I was going the booming of cannon, repeated at intervals. It occurred to me at once, that the firing was from the gunboats lying in the river at Hertford, and out of respect to President Lincoln. This was not very comforting; for while there was no reason why I should apprehend trouble or annoyance, I did not fancy facing the music all alone, satisfied as I was of meeting in the town sailors and
Petersburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
hnson and Hampton and of their noble compatriots who imperiled all in the defence of home, in the cause of truth, in the maintenance of right, in the support of freedom, and in the exhibition of every trait appertaining to exalted manhood. Last days of Johnston's Army. A Comrade's experience with Gen. L. S. Baker's command at Weldon, N. C., during the fifteen days preceding Johnston's surrender at Greensboro, N. C. an Address delivered before A. P. Hill Camp Confederate Veterans, at Petersburg, Va. by James M. Mullen. comrades: Looking back, perhaps I am justified in saying that my lines during the late war were, in one sense, cast in pleasant places. At the time, and while the conflict was raging, I did not think so; but blessings brighten as they take their flight. Hudibras says that He who fights and runs away, Will live to fight another day; and thinking on my marcies during the piping times of peace that have succeeded the late unpleasantness, I have learned to
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
I suspect with no hearty desire to meet up with them, for he could but know that our force was not able to cope successfully with a full regiment. Upon reaching Jackson, we learned there that the regiment was the Third New York Cavalry, about six hundred strong, well mounted and thoroughly equipped with Spencer repeating carbines, and had passed through that town some hours before, and then must be near Murfreesboro, some twenty-five miles distant. After waiting several hours at Jackson, our guns were ordered back overland to Weldon, while the infantry, under Colonel Whitford's command, retired to Halifax. I shall always remember with pleasure one little followed the tattered battle-flags of Lee and of Jackson—rising from simple captain, grade by grade, through sheer force of skill and daring until as commander of Jackson's old corps he became Lee's right arm in that wondrous final campaign which has claimed the admiration of the brave of every nation. Virginia rebels. In con
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
missary of subsistence, died on, the 6th of last May. On the 18th of the following August, D. B. Gillison, private in the Third company of Goodwin's brigade, South Carolina State troops, was borne to our Confederate section in the city cemetery. There, nine days afterwards, we laid our battle-scarred companion, A. M. White, privth the following prominent Confederates: Brigadier-General R. Lindsay Walker, of the Army of Northern Virginia; Brigadier-General M. L. Bonham, ex governor of South Carolina; the Honorable Beverly Tucker, of Virginia, erstwhile in the diplomatic service of the Confederacy; the Honorable Elias Boudinot, a Cherokee chief, lawyer, lirgia; Brigadier-General B. D. Fry, at one time commanding in this city; Brigadier-General R. J. Henderson, of Georgia; Brigadier-General Thomas F. Drayton, of South Carolina; Joseph Eggleston Johnston, the hero of four wars, a most noted leader of Confederate armies, honored at home and abroad, and, general Beauregard excepted, so
Wake county (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
ve already detained you too long, and I must hasten on. The next morning, having been up all night, we presented anything but a martial appearance, and, if the truth must be told, our enthusiasm was at a low ebb, for we were pretty well satisfied that ours was a wild goose chase. Nothing but a sense of duty, and a reluctance to turn back as long as we were called upon to go forward, carried us on. For two days we wandered on over the hills and through the woods of Franklin, Johnston and Wake counties. On one of these days we passed through Louisburg, worn out and hungry. The good citizens of the town received us enthusiastically, and treated us most hospitably. It must have been an amusing sight to see us straggling through the streets, with flowers in one hand and something to eat in the other. It made a deep impression on me at the time, and I shall never forget the scene. About sundown on the 16th we reached Arpsboro and halted. There the general informed us he had reliabl
Canada (Canada) (search for this): chapter 3
Johnson only consented to take t with him. He was the life of the prison on Johnson's Island, though rapidly nearing death with consumption, and used to read the Episcopal service to his fellow-prisoners every Sunday. He used to tell them that he never knew how to appreciate his prayer-book, especially the litany, until he was himself a prisoner and invoked God's pity upon all prisoners and captives. He had a young, joyous-hearted brother in my command who is now an Episcopal clergyman in Canada, though he has recently been travelling and preaching in England in the interest of missions. This younger brother took charge of the remains of my youngest boy-brother, killed in action at Chancellorsville, and carried them to Richmond for burial in Hollywood. I have two young hero brothers buried in that beautiful cemetery on Monroe Hill. Robert Edward Lee. [compiled from the Richmond dispatch, January 20, 1891.] First observance of his Birth—day, January 19th—Ordained by the V
Hollywood (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
ow to appreciate his prayer-book, especially the litany, until he was himself a prisoner and invoked God's pity upon all prisoners and captives. He had a young, joyous-hearted brother in my command who is now an Episcopal clergyman in Canada, though he has recently been travelling and preaching in England in the interest of missions. This younger brother took charge of the remains of my youngest boy-brother, killed in action at Chancellorsville, and carried them to Richmond for burial in Hollywood. I have two young hero brothers buried in that beautiful cemetery on Monroe Hill. Robert Edward Lee. [compiled from the Richmond dispatch, January 20, 1891.] First observance of his Birth—day, January 19th—Ordained by the Virginia Assembly as a legal Holiday—Observed throughout Virginia, and in Georgia, Maryland and New York. The Birth-day of General Robert Edward Lee, ordained as a legal holiday by the Virginia Assembly, was on January 19th, 1891—its first recurrence after
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