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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones).

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The Virginia, or Merrimac: her real projector. In the Richmond Dispatch of March 29th appeared an article, written by Mr J. W. H. Porter, under the supervision of Constructor John L. Porter, purporting to be a correct version of the converting of the Merrimac into an iron-clad. Mr Porter says: In your issue of Sunday last, in the communication of Mr. Virginius Newton, headed The Merrimac's men , there appears the following: Upon this hulk, according to plans furnished by Lieutenant John M. Brooke of the Confederate States Navy (though the merit of the design is also claimed for Naval Constructor John L. Porter), was built a house or shield, &c. This does a grave injustice to a gallant old Confederate and Virginian, who sacrificed his all upon the altar of his country; and had Mr. Newton known fully the facts it is believed that he would have published his article with the names above reversed. The following dispassionate statement of Colonel Brooke of the fact
William P. Williamson (search for this): chapter 1.1
On the 23d of June a board consisting of W. P. Williamson, chief engineer; John M. Brooke, lieutenaonstructor and engineer, Messrs. Porter and Williamson. As time is of the first importance in the m the machinery was concerned, for which Engineer Williamson as alone responsible. I hope these pngs, and the Department then ordered Chief Engineer Williamson and Constructor Porter, from the nav an angle of inclination nearly identical. Mr. Williamson and Mr. Porter approved of the plan of hav by the enemy, and the Department directed Mr. Williamson, Lieutenant Brooke, and Mr. Porter to cons much respect, your obedient servants, William P. Williamson, Chief Engineer Confederate States Navto proceed with the constructor's duties. Mr. Williamson was charged with the engineer's departmentoke, and the Department then ordered Chief-Engineer Williamson and Constructor Porter from the navyport will show. Neither Mr. Porter nor Mr. Williamson was sent for to examine Lieutenant Brooke'[8 more...]
Pendergrast (search for this): chapter 1.1
such a row 'twas hard to say where in thunder all the licks came from. Very soon the Congress ran ashore—purposely, I suppose, to save herself from such a fate as the Cumberland—and we had not given her many shots before she hauled down the Stars and Stripes and soon afterwards hoisted the while flag at her peak. Parker and Alexander, in the Beaufort and Raleigh, were ordered to go to her, send her men on shore, bring the officers on board, and burn the ship; but on going alongside, Pendergrast (Austin) surrendered the ship to Parker, and told him that he had too many wounded to burn the ship. Billy told him to have the wounded removed at once; and while the Raleigh and Beaufort were at this humane work the Yankees on shore opened fire on them, killing some of their own men, among them a lieutenant. Parker and Alexander then left her with some twenty or thirty prisoners, the fire from shore being too hot; and as Alexander backed out in the Raleigh he was fired at from the po
John L. Porter (search for this): chapter 1.1
nverting of the Merrimac into an iron-clad. Mr Porter says: In your issue of Sunday last, innt ordered Chief Engineer Williamson and Constructor Porter from the navy yard at Norfolk to Richmondispatch. Chief Engineer Williamson and Constructor Porter, severally in charge of the two branchesination nearly identical. Mr. Williamson and Mr. Porter approved of the plan of having submerged endoke, Lieutenant, Confederate States Navy, John L. Porter, Naval Constructor. Immediately upon and plans of the constructor and engineer, Mrs. Porter and Williamson. S. R. Mallory, Secretary Cesign of the engines. The Secretary says: Mr. Porter cut the ship down, submerged her ends, perfove been cut much lower than my plan. Constructor Porter knew that the depth of submergence was thief-Engineer Confederate States Navy, and John L. Porter, Constructor Confederate States Navy, the iable testimony thus given be much shaken by Mr. Porter's flippant answer to the question why he he [66 more...]
W. P. Williamson (search for this): chapter 1.1
and adopted them. I then asked that Chief Engineer Williamson and Constructor Porter should be sento the yard. Constructor Porter and Chief Engineer Williamson were then ordered to report. They cry said he wished to show Messrs. Porter and Williamson a plan proposed by Lieutenant Brooke. The pDepartment. Mr. Mallory then directed Messrs. Williamson and Porter to ascertain if suitable engirt of work. Accepting his offer I went with Williamson to the Tredegar Works, where we learned that no suitable engines could be had. Williamson then said that the engines of the Merrimac could, he thould leave the wording of the report to Messrs. Williamson and Porter. I noticed that in designatierate States, The Department ordered Chief Engineer Williamson and Constructor Porter from the navy, of the navy, thereby doing myself and Engineer Williamson the greatest injustice, I feel called uetary then ordered a board, composed of Engineer Williamson, Lieutenant Brooke, and myself, to exam
and to build, equip and fit her in all respects according to the design and plans of the constructor and engineer, Messrs. Porter and Williamson. As time is of the first importance in the matter, you will see that the work progresses without delay to completion [italics Porter's]. S. R. Mallory, Secretary Confederate States Navy. Lieutenant Brooke is not even hinted at in this letter. After the ship had been in progress for six weeks the Secretary wrote the following letter to Flag-officer Forrest on the subject: [Copy.] Confederate States Navy Department, Richmond, August 10, 1861. Flag-officer French Forrest, Commanding Navy Yard, Gosport, Va. Sir: The great importance of the service expected from the Merrimac, and the urgent necessity of her speedy completion, induce me to call upon you to push forward the work with the utmost dispatch. Chief Engineer Williamson and Constructor Porter, severally in charge of the two branches of this great work and for which they will
June 23rd, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 1.1
a ram to strike the wooden bottoms of iron-clad vessels. This plan of construction is applicable in plating effectually ships built in the usual manner; it being simply necessary to remove the upper works and to cut them down forward and abaft the shield sufficiently to submerge the ends when down to the load-line, as illustrated in the case of the Confederate States steamer Virginia, which vessel was constructed in accordance with the plan herein set forth, furnished by me on the 23rd day of June, 1861, to the Honorable S. R. Mallory, Secretary of the Navy, to William P. Williamson, Chief-Engineer Confederate States Navy, and John L. Porter, Constructor Confederate States Navy, the two latter having been directed by the Honorable Secretary of the Navy, in conjunction with myself, to devise an iron-clad vessel. And this plan was applied to the Merrimac in preference to constructing a new vessel of eight or ten feet draft, in consequence of the impossibility of procuring in time boi
March 29th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 1.1
eport. Constructor Porter adopted the word board in his reply to Justice, and thereafter used it as the best suited to his purpose. A reply elicited by this article appeared in the Examiner of April 3d: The Virginia. Gosport Navy-yard, March 29, 1862. To the Editor of the Examiner: Having seen an article in the Richmond Enquirer, and one also in the Whig, claiming the plan of the iron-clad ship Virginia for Lieutenant John M. Brooke, of the navy, thereby doing myself and Engineer WilliA similar arrangement was the immediate cause of the loss of the iron-clad Tennessee. On the 4th of April Secretary Mallory's report to the House of Representatives appeared in the Examiner. Confederate States Navy Department, Richmond, March 29, 1862. Hon. Thomas S. Bocock, Speaker of the House of Representatives: Sir: In compliance with the resolution adopted by the House of Representatives on the 18th instant, That the Secretary of the Navy be requested to make a report to this House
July 29th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 1.1
e said improvement, and praying that a patent may be granted for that purpose: These are, therefore, to grant according to law to the said John M. Brooke, his heirs, administrators or assigns, for the term of fourteen years from the 29th day of July, 1862, the full and exclusive right and liberty of making, constructing, using, and vending to others to be used, the said improvement, a description whereof is given in the words of the said Brooke in the schedule hereunto annexed, and is madetes of America. (Signed) T. H. Watts, Attorney-General. Countersigned and sealed with the seal of the Patent Office. Rufus H. Rhodes, Commissioner of Patents. Specifications annexed to Patent No. 100, granted to John M. Brooke, July 29, 1862: To all whom it may concern: Be it known that I, John M. Brooke, a lieutenant in the Navy of the Confederate States, have invented a new and improved form of vessel, to be iron-clad, and if desired (armed) with cannon; and I do hereby d
October, 1887 AD (search for this): chapter 1.1
design is also claimed for Naval Constructor John L. Porter), was built a house or shield, &c. This does a grave injustice to a gallant old Confederate and Virginian, who sacrificed his all upon the altar of his country; and had Mr. Newton known fully the facts it is believed that he would have published his article with the names above reversed. The following dispassionate statement of Colonel Brooke of the facts connected with the conversion of the Merrimac is conclusive: In October, 1887, I was requested by the editor of the Century to prepare a note stating what my relations were to the construction of the Merrimac. This note, containing the only public reference to Mr. Porter or his claim that I have ever made, will be found in Battles and Leaders of the Civil War, Vol. I, p. 715; and on the following page a similar note by Constructor John L. Porter as to his relations. To these notes the attention of the reader is invited. But as the book is not always accessible
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