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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones).

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Pittsburgh (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.1
eeing the failure of Lieutenant Brooke's scheme, Constructor Porter then had another model made like the one he made at Pittsburg in 1847. [Italics mine.] Mr. Porter is mistaken as to the ship-carpenter. Mr. Joseph Pearce (Mr. Porter spells itmade, took it to Richmond personally, and submitted it to Secretary Mallory. As to its being like the one he made at Pittsburg in 1847, I can but say that the only reference to that model I have seen is in Constructor Porter's note of his relatiouilt that way by the Confederate States. Subsequent vessels were made after the model which Constructor Porter made at Pittsburg in 1847, with the ends above the water and protected like the roof. But the model made after the return of the ship-carpenter to the yard, like the one he made at Pittsburg, had its ends under the roof and submerged just two feet, and no vessels were ever built after that model in the Confederate States. When the Merrimac, after conversion, was floated, it wa
Providence, R. I. (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.1
st wise said the concussion and report from the guns would deafen the men. Some said she would not steer; and public opinion generally about here said she would never come out of the dock. You have no idea what I have suffered in mind since I commenced her, but I knew what I was about, and I persevered. Some of her inboard arrangements are of the most intricate character, and have caused me many sleepless nights in making them, but all have turned out right, and thanks are due to a kind Providence whose blessings on my efforts I have many times invoked. I must say I was astonished at the success of the Virginia. She destroyed the Cumberland in fifteen minutes, and in thirty more the Congress was captured. The Minnesota would have shared the same fate, but she got aground, and the Virginia could not get at her. In the Whig of March 22, appeared the following letter: The Virginia. Richmond, March 18, 1862. To the Editor of the Whig: As the brilliant success of the Virginia
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.1
ffice. The drawings accompanying this article are from the patent, reduced to one-fifth of the original scale. No. 100. the Confederate States of America. To all to whom these letters patent shall come: Whereas John M. Brooke, of Richmond, Virginia, has alleged that he has invented a new and useful improvement in ships of war, which he states has not been known or used before his application; has made oath that he is a citizen of the Confederate States; that he does verily believe tha I applied through Paymaster Semple, for information on the subject, who swears positively that he obtained the constructor's written report that the ship could be lightened to even seventeen feet, and would have stability to that draft in the James river. Now, whether Mr. Semple misunderstood Mr. Porter or not, there can be no doubt of the nature of the reply communicated to me through a reliable source, upon which, in the nature of things, having no knowledge of my own, I was obliged to rely
Norfolk (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.1
ill, I think, be read with interest: Naval hospital, Norfolk, Va., March 11, 1862. Many thanks, my dear Brooke, for yoer Williamson and Constructor Porter from the navy yard at Norfolk to Richmond for consultation on the same subject generally the department, and a practical mechanic was brought from Norfolk to aid in preparing the drawings and specifications. Thisr Williamson and Constructor Porter, from the navy yard at Norfolk, to Richmond, about the 23d of June, for consultation on tstates that the practical mechanic who was brought up from Norfolk was unable to make the drawings for Lieutenant Brooke, ander Williamson and Constructor Porter from the navy-yard at Norfolk to Richmond, about the 23d of June, for consultation on thones. [extract.] Confederate States steamer Virginia, Norfolk, March 7, 1862. my dear Brooke: * * * The edges of our nowledge would have been of service to the Confederacy. Norfolk had fallen, and the brave Tattnall sought to save the Virg
Portsmouth, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.1
reased, the efficiency of the principle of submerged ends became apparent. The means at command in the Confederacy were not adequate to the complete development of the principle in sea-going ships. Plates of sufficient thickness to afford protection when placed vertically could not be made; but in 1874 it was applied in England. The following description of the Inflexible is from Chief-Engineer J. W. King's War Ships and Navies of the World. The Inflexible, which was commenced at Portsmouth dock-yard in February, 1874, and launched April, 1876, is a twin-screw, double-turret ship, with a central armored citadel. She was designed by Mr. Barnaby, the Director of Naval Construction at the Admiralty, and at a meeting of the Institution of Naval Architects in London, he describes the vessel in the following language: Imagine a floating castle 110 feet long and 75 feet wide, rising 10 feet out of water, and having above that again two round turrets planted diagonally at its
Big Lick (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.1
d Buch., seeing what the scoundrels were doing, made our recall, and deliberately backing the Virginia up stream poured gun after gun, hot shot and incendiary shells into her stern and quarter, setting her on fire; but while doing this he was knocked over by a minnie ball through his left thigh, and the medicos laid us together in the cabin, while brave, cool, determined old Jones fought the action out in his quiet way, giving them thunder all the time. As you supposed, the Minnesota and Roanoke came to the assistance of the two sailing frigates, but the former got aground, and the latter ran—actually turned tail, and, as the sailors say, pulled foot for Old Point. The St. Lawrence got a dose and cleared out, leaving the Minnesota alone in her sad plight, hard and fast aground, with some tugs trying to lighten her, and taking the fire from our squadron, to which she replied as well as she could, generally from her forward pivot gun. She being aground, and night coming on, of cours
Old Point (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.1
her stern and quarter, setting her on fire; but while doing this he was knocked over by a minnie ball through his left thigh, and the medicos laid us together in the cabin, while brave, cool, determined old Jones fought the action out in his quiet way, giving them thunder all the time. As you supposed, the Minnesota and Roanoke came to the assistance of the two sailing frigates, but the former got aground, and the latter ran—actually turned tail, and, as the sailors say, pulled foot for Old Point. The St. Lawrence got a dose and cleared out, leaving the Minnesota alone in her sad plight, hard and fast aground, with some tugs trying to lighten her, and taking the fire from our squadron, to which she replied as well as she could, generally from her forward pivot gun. She being aground, and night coming on, of course Jones could not carry on the fight, and after a hard night of it the Commodore and I were landed early on Sunday morning at Seawell's Point, and Jones took the ship into
Patrick Henry (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.1
irty prisoners, the fire from shore being too hot; and as Alexander backed out in the Raleigh he was fired at from the ports of the Congress, though she had surrendered to us. A dastardly, cowardly act! Buchanan not getting Parker's report, and the frigate not being burnt, he accepted my volunteered services to burn her; and, taking eight men and our only remaining boat, I pulled for her, with Webb in the gallant little Teazer steaming up soon afterwards to cover me. In the meantime the Patrick Henry, Jamestown, and Teazer had come splendidly into action just about the time or a little before the Congress struck, and when I left the old beauty they were doing grand work with their guns on the Minnesota and shore batteries. I did not think the Yankees on shore would fire at me on my errand to the Congress, but when in about two hundred and fifty yards of her they opened on me from the shore with muskets and artillery; and the way the balls danced around my little boat and crew was
Sewell's Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.1
the sailors say, pulled foot for Old Point. The St. Lawrence got a dose and cleared out, leaving the Minnesota alone in her sad plight, hard and fast aground, with some tugs trying to lighten her, and taking the fire from our squadron, to which she replied as well as she could, generally from her forward pivot gun. She being aground, and night coming on, of course Jones could not carry on the fight, and after a hard night of it the Commodore and I were landed early on Sunday morning at Seawell's Point, and Jones took the ship into action that day, fighting her like a bold seaman, as he is. He must tell you of his tussle with the Eric, a very devil of an iron battery, for he has just come in and said he had a letter from you. God bless old Buchanan for a true-hearted patriot and bold, dashing sailor, as brave as brave can be; but he exposed himself entirely too much, and was struck by a musket or minnie ball while on the upper deck, I believe, for I was under the doctor's hands then,
Gosport (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.1
p had been in progress for six weeks the Secretary wrote the following letter to Flag-officer Forrest on the subject: [Copy.] Confederate States Navy Department, Richmond, August 10, 1861. Flag-officer French Forrest, Commanding Navy Yard, Gosport, Va. Sir: The great importance of the service expected from the Merrimac, and the urgent necessity of her speedy completion, induce me to call upon you to push forward the work with the utmost dispatch. Chief Engineer Williamson and Constructor to be, Very respectfully, Your obedient servant, S. R. Mallory, Secretary of the Navy. [Italics mine.] On the 11th of April the Examiner published Mr. Porter's reply to the Secretary's report. Who planned the Virginia? Navy yard, Gosport, April 8, 1862. To the Editor of the Examiner: Under this caption I find in the Examiner of the 4th instant a report of the Secretary of the Navy to Congress, giving a detailed statement of the origin of the iron-clad Virginia. I feel sor
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