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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones).

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March 28th, 1865 AD (search for this): chapter 1.2
ility to attend the second concert. We have with pleasure seen the committee on distribution from day today going from division to division distributing to those most needy vegetables, fruits and other anti-scorbutics. The good effects of this benevolent association are being already developed through their energetic and worthy committee. Below is the statement of receipts and disbursements of concerts of the 21st and 28th of March. Statement of receipts of concerts March 21 and 28, 1865, given for the benefit of sick and destitute officers: Receipts. By cash$187 55 178 pounds tobacco, 50089 00 —— $276 55 Expenses. Total expenses$92 30 Balance184 25 —— $276 55 Cash receipts$187 55 Less expenses92 30 —— Amount of cash$95 25 Amount of tobacco for distribution, 178 pounds. R. W. Carter, Colonel First Virginia Cavalry; C. E. Chambers, Captain Thirteenth Alabama; W. Hays, Lieutenant Second Kentucky Cavalry, committee. Christian A
term applied to new arrivals, captured on recent battle-fields. Upon their entrance to the fort they were greeted with the cry of Fresh Fish by all the old residents, and immediately interviewed to learn the latest from the outside world, and if Lee had whipped 'em again. The Times is dated April 8th--the day before Lee surrendered the remnants of the Army of Northern Virginia at Appomattox—and it is presumed that no later number of the Times was issued, but that the occupants of the diffe Fresh Fish by all the old residents, and immediately interviewed to learn the latest from the outside world, and if Lee had whipped 'em again. The Times is dated April 8th--the day before Lee surrendered the remnants of the Army of Northern Virginia at Appomattox—and it is presumed that no later number of the Times was issued, but that the occupants of the different divisions were soon released and wended their way to their homes in Dixie land. William Miller Owen. Springfield Republic
rbutics. The good effects of this benevolent association are being already developed through their energetic and worthy committee. Below is the statement of receipts and disbursements of concerts of the 21st and 28th of March. Statement of receipts of concerts March 21 and 28, 1865, given for the benefit of sick and destitute officers: Receipts. By cash$187 55 178 pounds tobacco, 50089 00 —— $276 55 Expenses. Total expenses$92 30 Balance184 25 —— $276 55 Cash receipts$187 55 Less expenses92 30 —— Amount of cash$95 25 Amount of tobacco for distribution, 178 pounds. R. W. Carter, Colonel First Virginia Cavalry; C. E. Chambers, Captain Thirteenth Alabama; W. Hays, Lieutenant Second Kentucky Cavalry, committee. Christian Association directory. President—I. Hardeman, Lieutenant-Colonel Twelfth Georgia, Division 22. First Vice President—T. A. Boyle, Adjutant Thirty-second North Carolina, Division 25. Second Vice-Presiden
Captain Third Kentucky Battalion; secretary, T. L. Pritchett, Captain Sixty-fourth Georgia. The allusion in the columns of the Times to the Grapevine and Fresh Fish will be recognized by old soldiers, the former being applied to the rumors of events occurring outside the prison that were supposed to be communicated through the grapevine, or underground telegraph line. Fresh Fish was the term applied to new arrivals, captured on recent battle-fields. Upon their entrance to the fort they were greeted with the cry of Fresh Fish by all the old residents, and immediately interviewed to learn the latest from the outside world, and if Lee had whipped 'em Fish by all the old residents, and immediately interviewed to learn the latest from the outside world, and if Lee had whipped 'em again. The Times is dated April 8th--the day before Lee surrendered the remnants of the Army of Northern Virginia at Appomattox—and it is presumed that no later number of the Times was issued, but that the occupants of the different divisions were soon released and wended their way to their homes in Dixie land. William Miller
April 8th, 1865 AD (search for this): chapter 1.2
Walker. Dental Card.—Lieutenant R. F. Taylor can be found at all hours. Division 28. Music.—Instructions given on the guitar by T. Gordon Bland, Lieutenant 10th La. Cavalry. Call at Division 26, S. E. corner, first tier. Prison times. published in Division27 by I. W. Hibbs, Captain Thirteenth Virginia Infantry. Proprietors and editors: George S. Thomas, Captain 64th Ga., Div. 24; W. H. Bennett, Captain and A. C. S., Div. 24; A. Harris, Lieutenant 3d Fla., Div. 28. Saturday, April 8, 1865. Salutatory. There are more than sixteen hundred officers in our barracks within an enclosure containing scarce five acres of ground. One would suppose that the fact of so many men being thus crowded together would tend to create the greatest amount of sociability and afford unrivaled facilities for forming and cementing extreme personal friendships. But there seems to be as much isolation of individuals and as many little cliques and communities as in large cities of th
his noble head, as though To give that word the reverence due, And gently said, ‘My mother.’ The fortitude that neither calumny nor calamity can crush never fails to command respect. Such fortitude is only attainable when one is calm in the rectitude of the cause in which he suffers, and feels that no false testimony can mislead the universal and eternal Judge. Then, indeed, is the sufferer happy, and despite of adversity feels that the clouds around him are not the frowns of heaven. Bulwer. Advertisements. Division 22.—M. L. White, Lieutenant Thirty-third N. C. T., is prepared to execute all kinds of engravings on metals with neatness and dispatch. B. F. Cartwright & Co.—Division 24—Manufacture plain and gutta-percha rings, chains and breastpins, etc. Call and see specimens of our work. Tailoring Establishment.—Division 22—Griggs & Church, successors to Beval, Bowman & Church, are prepared to execute all kinds of fashionable tailoring at reasonable rates, a
materials the rest of the fine arts are not so entensively cultivated. But we have, nevertheless, a few artists who exhibit considerable skill in the art of drawing and sketching. The learned professions—theology, law and medicine—are not without their representatives, and, though Othello's occupation is gone, as far as the practice of law and medicine are concerned (our law and physic being imported ready made at present), there are students to be found poring over the musty tomes of Blackstone and Esculapius. There are also debating clubs in Divisions 22 and 32. Every Thursday night these clubs hold meetings, open to the public, and some questions of interest are discussed. Then we have a Christian Association for the relief of prisoners. We have time and space at present only to call attention of our readers to the directory of this most excellent institution, which will be found in another column. The list of standing committees there given will give some idea of the
William Hays (search for this): chapter 1.2
d, Tenth Louisiana cavalry, to the commandant of the prison, and permission was obtained for concerts to be given. Lieutenant W. Hays, Second Kentucky cavalry, the prisoners' friend, and ever ready to alleviate their condition, was selected as managr distribution, 178 pounds. R. W. Carter, Colonel First Virginia Cavalry; C. E. Chambers, Captain Thirteenth Alabama; W. Hays, Lieutenant Second Kentucky Cavalry, committee. Christian Association directory. President—I. Hardeman, Lieutenars, Lieutenant L. Stripling, Sixty-first Georgia, Adjutant M. S. Smallman, Eighth Tennessee. Division 27—Chief, Lieutenant W. Hays, Second Kentucky; postmasters, Lieutenant James Hewitt, Tenth Kentucky, Adjutant A. S. Webb, Forty-fourth North Carll, Third Kentucky Cavalry. Musical Association—President, R. W. Carter, Colonel First Virginia Cavalry; secretary, William Hays, Lieutenant Second Kentucky Cavalry; manager, P. B. Akers, Lieutenant Eleventh Virginia Infantry; musical director, T.<
E. D. Willett (search for this): chapter 1.2
stances surrounding them, perfected organizations for the entertainment and comfort of all the great company. Musical and Christian associations were formed, and finally they issued the Prison Times. The Times illustrates so plainly the cheerful and hopeful spirit of these gallant officers, and gives such insight behind the scenes of prison life, that it deserves to be preserved among the annals of the great war. The original paper was presented to the Historical Association by Major E. D. Willett, who received it from the wife of Lieutenant A. T. Turner, Fifteenth Louisiana regiment, who was Chief of Division 25, in the barracks of Fort Delaware. It is so worn and torn that it is almost illegible, and can only be deciphered by using a strong reading-glass. As it is impossible to present it in fac simile, it is given below in cold type, and it may prove of interest to the survivors of the life at Fort Delaware or to their descendants, should they be no longer with us.
William Miller Owen (search for this): chapter 1.2
talion; secretary, T. L. Pritchett, Captain Sixty-fourth Georgia. The allusion in the columns of the Times to the Grapevine and Fresh Fish will be recognized by old soldiers, the former being applied to the rumors of events occurring outside the prison that were supposed to be communicated through the grapevine, or underground telegraph line. Fresh Fish was the term applied to new arrivals, captured on recent battle-fields. Upon their entrance to the fort they were greeted with the cry of Fresh Fish by all the old residents, and immediately interviewed to learn the latest from the outside world, and if Lee had whipped 'em again. The Times is dated April 8th--the day before Lee surrendered the remnants of the Army of Northern Virginia at Appomattox—and it is presumed that no later number of the Times was issued, but that the occupants of the different divisions were soon released and wended their way to their homes in Dixie land. William Miller Owen. Springfield Republican
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