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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones).

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Robert Archer (search for this): chapter 1.1
mmended the substitution of two-inch plates. The third proposition made by me was to pierce the shield for bow and quarter ports, for you had omitted them, leaving four points of approach without fire. An accident to the engine, propeller or rudder would have placed the ship at the mercy of an antagonist; and this alteration was made. The fourth alteration was the removal of the wheel-ropes—chains— from beneath the plates outside, where they were liable to be jammed by a shot. Mr. Robert Archer was present when I called your attention to this liability. The alteration was not made, however, until Lieutenant Jones called your attention to it a second time. The fifth alteration was the making of two additional hatches—your plan of detail providing for only two. The sixth suggestion was that arrangements should be made to permit the use of small-arms. You were left to your discretion, but a plan was given, if you could not think of a better one. You replied at length; t<
Rufus H. Rhodes (search for this): chapter 1.1
hereunto annexed, and is made a part of these presents. In testimony whereof, I have caused these letters to be made patent, and the seal of the Patent Office has been hereunto affixed. Given under my hand at the city of Richmond, this 29th day of July, in the year of our Lord 1862. Seal of the Patent Office, (Our First President.) Confederate States of America. (Signed) T. H. Watts, Attorney-General. Countersigned and sealed with the seal of the Patent Office. Rufus H. Rhodes, Commissioner of Patents. Specifications annexed to Patent No. 100, granted to John M. Brooke, July 29, 1862: To all whom it may concern: Be it known that I, John M. Brooke, a lieutenant in the Navy of the Confederate States, have invented a new and improved form of vessel, to be iron-clad, and if desired (armed) with cannon; and I do hereby declare that the following is a full and exact description thereof, reference being had to the annexed drawings making a part of this speci
S. N. Charles (search for this): chapter 1.1
my invention, and desire to secure by letters patent, consists in so constructing the hull of a vessel that her bow and stern shall each extend under water beyond the forward and after ends of the shield C, which protects the crew and guns, sufficiently to give the sharpness necessary to the attainment of high speed and the buoyancy to support the weight of iron applied without an inconvenient increase of draft. John M. Brooke, Lieutenant C S. Navy. Witness: George Minor, Commander, C S. N. Charles J. Ost. Zzz Mr. Porter continues: But his patent was not contested by the builder of the Merrimac, because no one would have thought of building such a vessel with submerged ends except as a matter of necessity, for it left the crew no space to exercise. One might suppose that Constructor Porter, as deeply concerned as he was in maintaining his claim, would have welcomed the opportunity to establish it. And no other vessel was built that way by the Confederate States.
on, and desire to secure by letters patent, consists in so constructing the hull of a vessel that her bow and stern shall each extend under water beyond the forward and after ends of the shield C, which protects the crew and guns, sufficiently to give the sharpness necessary to the attainment of high speed and the buoyancy to support the weight of iron applied without an inconvenient increase of draft. John M. Brooke, Lieutenant C S. Navy. Witness: George Minor, Commander, C S. N. Charles J. Ost. Zzz Mr. Porter continues: But his patent was not contested by the builder of the Merrimac, because no one would have thought of building such a vessel with submerged ends except as a matter of necessity, for it left the crew no space to exercise. One might suppose that Constructor Porter, as deeply concerned as he was in maintaining his claim, would have welcomed the opportunity to establish it. And no other vessel was built that way by the Confederate States. Subsequent
August 10th, 1887 AD (search for this): chapter 1.1
tract from a private letter, given above, which, Mr. Scharf says, was published in the Charleston Mercury of April 8th, 1862. Knowing that this extract, the first publication connecting Mr. Porter's name with the Merrimac, had appeared at an earlier date, I wrote to Colonel Joseph Yates, whom I had known as one of the gallant defenders of Charleston, and an accomplished artillerist, requesting him to ascertain the date of publication. He replied as follows: ten-mile Mill, S. C., August 10, 1887. I find that all the files of the Charleston Mercury are in the Charleston library, and not one paper missing. There is a great deal said about the Virginia and her fights, and I find the letter you refer to was published in the Mercury dated March 19th, 1862, no date given to the writing of the same. You have an exact copy, as quoted to me in your letter of August 3d. * * Yours truly, Joseph A. Yates. The order of date of publication of the three extracts from Mr. Porter'
Minnesota (Minnesota, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.1
r a little before the Congress struck, and when I left the old beauty they were doing grand work with their guns on the Minnesota and shore batteries. I did not think the Yankees on shore would fire at me on my errand to the Congress, but when in determined old Jones fought the action out in his quiet way, giving them thunder all the time. As you supposed, the Minnesota and Roanoke came to the assistance of the two sailing frigates, but the former got aground, and the latter ran—actuallyned tail, and, as the sailors say, pulled foot for Old Point. The St. Lawrence got a dose and cleared out, leaving the Minnesota alone in her sad plight, hard and fast aground, with some tugs trying to lighten her, and taking the fire from our squass of the Virginia. She destroyed the Cumberland in fifteen minutes, and in thirty more the Congress was captured. The Minnesota would have shared the same fate, but she got aground, and the Virginia could not get at her. In the Whig of March 22
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.1
er is the extract from a private letter, given above, which, Mr. Scharf says, was published in the Charleston Mercury of April 8th, 1862. Knowing that this extract, the first publication connecting Mr. Porter's name with the Merrimac, had appeared at an earlier date, I wrote to Colonel Joseph Yates, whom I had known as one of the gallant defenders of Charleston, and an accomplished artillerist, requesting him to ascertain the date of publication. He replied as follows: ten-mile Mill, S. C., August 10, 1887. I find that all the files of the Charleston Mercury are in the Charleston library, and not one paper missing. There is a great deal said about the Virginia and her fights, and I find the letter you refer to was published in the Mercury dated March 19th, 1862, no date given to the writing of the same. You have an exact copy, as quoted to me in your letter of August 3d. * * Yours truly, Joseph A. Yates. The order of date of publication of the three extracts from
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.1
ration would have been made but for the delay which would have attended it. The ship is now deficient in that respect. The sixth proposition was to put six inches of iron on bow and stern. Approved by the Secretary but omitted, from your statement that the ship would not carry it. John M. Brooke, Lieutenant, C. S. Navy. The faulty arrangement of the wheel-ropes was brought to my notice by Lieutenant Jones. A similar arrangement was the immediate cause of the loss of the iron-clad Tennessee. On the 4th of April Secretary Mallory's report to the House of Representatives appeared in the Examiner. Confederate States Navy Department, Richmond, March 29, 1862. Hon. Thomas S. Bocock, Speaker of the House of Representatives: Sir: In compliance with the resolution adopted by the House of Representatives on the 18th instant, That the Secretary of the Navy be requested to make a report to this House of the plan and construction of the Virginia, so far as the same can be proper
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 1.1
t to the House of Representatives of the Confederate States, The Department ordered Chief Engineer Wy. (Signed) S. R. Mallory, Secretary Confederate States Navy. Of the great and skillful calc, William P. Williamson, Chief Engineer Confederate States Navy, John M. Brooke, Lieutenant, Confeas made oath that he is a citizen of the Confederate States; that he does verily believe that he is used; has paid into the treasury of the Confederate States the sum of forty dollars, and presented -line, as illustrated in the case of the Confederate States steamer Virginia, which vessel was constto William P. Williamson, Chief-Engineer Confederate States Navy, and John L. Porter, Constructor Coo other vessel was built that way by the Confederate States. Subsequent vessels were made after the were ever built after that model in the Confederate States. When the Merrimac, after conversion, Catesby Ap. R. Jones. [extract.] Confederate States steamer Virginia, Norfolk, March 7, 1862[14 more...]
Beaufort, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.1
ore—purposely, I suppose, to save herself from such a fate as the Cumberland—and we had not given her many shots before she hauled down the Stars and Stripes and soon afterwards hoisted the while flag at her peak. Parker and Alexander, in the Beaufort and Raleigh, were ordered to go to her, send her men on shore, bring the officers on board, and burn the ship; but on going alongside, Pendergrast (Austin) surrendered the ship to Parker, and told him that he had too many wounded to burn the ship. Billy told him to have the wounded removed at once; and while the Raleigh and Beaufort were at this humane work the Yankees on shore opened fire on them, killing some of their own men, among them a lieutenant. Parker and Alexander then left her with some twenty or thirty prisoners, the fire from shore being too hot; and as Alexander backed out in the Raleigh he was fired at from the ports of the Congress, though she had surrendered to us. A dastardly, cowardly act! Buchanan not getting P
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