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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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July 26th, 1891 AD (search for this): chapter 1.23
Lieutenant-General A. P. Hill. [from the Richmond Dispatch, July 26, August 2, 1891]. Some Reminiscences of the famous Virginia Commander——Curious Mistakes growing out of the absence of his insignia of Rank—Teamsters' blunders Reproved with Vigor—The First burial of his remains. Having seen an account of the removal of the remains of Lieutenant-General A. P. Hill from Hollywood cemetery to the site of the monument erected to his memory at the intersection of Laburnam avenue and the Hermitage road, about two miles north of Richmond, my mind was naturally drawn to the career of that gallant officer in the war for Southern independence. It was my fortune to be a member of his military family during the First Maryland campaign, which, as is well known, included the capture of Harper's Ferry with about ten thousand Federal troops, together with immense supplies and arms, and closed with the terrific engagement at Sharpsburg, as we called it, or Antietam, as the Federals ha
December 1st, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 1.23
rown me in your hands. Hill with impetuosity said: D——n the fortunes of war, General; get to the rear; you are in danger here. Hill's duties required him to undergo the exposure, but he could not bear the idea of having even an enemy unnecessarily exposed. Breaking camp at Castleman's Ferry, in November, we moved up the Valley, crossed the Blue Ridge by the turnpike from Newmarket to Gordonsville, and marched toward Fredericksburg, which we reached (or the vicinity of it) about December 1, 1862. At this time I was relieved of duty by the return of Major Hill, and went back to my brigade, which had lost its beloved Branch at Sharpsburg, and was now under command of Brigadier-General James H. Lane, who had earned his promotion while in command of the Twenty-eighth North Carolina, one of the regiments of that hard-fought brigade. Closing incidents. The battle of Fredericksburg passed and so did the winter, when the spring-time called us to Chancellorsville, the sad scene
e was captured and taken to General Hill, just in rear of the Confederate line, where the minnie balls were flying briskly around. General Prince said: General, the fortunes of war have thrown me in your hands. Hill with impetuosity said: D——n the fortunes of war, General; get to the rear; you are in danger here. Hill's duties required him to undergo the exposure, but he could not bear the idea of having even an enemy unnecessarily exposed. Breaking camp at Castleman's Ferry, in November, we moved up the Valley, crossed the Blue Ridge by the turnpike from Newmarket to Gordonsville, and marched toward Fredericksburg, which we reached (or the vicinity of it) about December 1, 1862. At this time I was relieved of duty by the return of Major Hill, and went back to my brigade, which had lost its beloved Branch at Sharpsburg, and was now under command of Brigadier-General James H. Lane, who had earned his promotion while in command of the Twenty-eighth North Carolina, one of t
April 2nd, 1865 AD (search for this): chapter 1.23
bout the same time. He was not in command for a day or so, but was an interested spectator of that heated engagement which was under the direct command of General J. E. B. Stuart. This over, a reorganization, so to speak, took place. General A. P. Hill was made lieutenant-general and W. D. Pender major-general of Hill's Light division. From then on I only saw General Hill occasionally. But our friendship—for it was nothing less than that—continued to the end. And on the morning of the 2d of April, 1865, when I saw his dead body brought from the field in the ambulance, I know that no one except his nearest of kin could have felt a sharper pang of grief than I did, and none had warmer tears course down their cheeks than myself. General Hill was firm, without austerity; genial, without familiarity, and brave, without ostentation. The gentleman and soldier were so completely blended in him that he never had to deviate from one to act the other. He was both all the time. D. F
To this the courier replied General Hill ordered the wagons forward, when the sergeant consentingly replied well if General Hill told you to order them forward all right, and the train was put in motion. The sergeant finding that I approved of the course was much relieved, and we trotted off towards the head of the wagon train. Presently we came to a delightful shady grove just on the roadside, where a number of officers were resting their steeds and enjoying the refreshing breeze on a hot July day and a fearful dusty march. One of them I saluted and said: Good morning, General, and exchanged a few words with the party and continued on. The sergeant said in a subdued tone: Didn't you call that man General? I said: Yes; that is General Hill. To this he said he'd be dad burned if that wasn't the courier that told him to move the train forward. And so it was; but the General knew the sergeant did not recognize him and gave the order accordingly. A lesson to Pat. When
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