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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Romney (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.25
a dispatch-bearer to General Crook, and finally succeeded in reaching his bed-room. He announced himself to the astonished General as General Rosser, of the Confederate army, informed him that he was a prisoner of war, and told him that he had two minutes to dress. The General hesitating, Vandiver told him that his clothes were there, and that he could either put them on or be taken as he was. It is needless to say that the General dressed, and dressed quickly. They took him to the street, Vandiver mounted his horse, and the General was placed on the horse behind him. They rode down and were joined by the party who had taken General Kelly from his bed at the St. Nicholas, and in a little while they were out beyond the confines of Cumberland. The countersign, Bull's Gap, now stood them in hand, and they got a start before the alarm was spread. They reached Romney without any trouble, except an exchange of shots with a handful of cavalry that had got together and pursued them.
Bull's Gap (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.25
slush, and the water was high enough to wet every man. They captured the first pickets with which they came in contact, and, by stringing a German soldier to the limb of a tree by a bridle rein, they secured from him the countersign, which was Bull's Gap. With this pass-word in their possession they moved on down the county road to Cumberland. On the way they ran into a squad of thirty or forty infantry, who halted them and demanded that one dismount and give the countersign. They dashed i, Vandiver mounted his horse, and the General was placed on the horse behind him. They rode down and were joined by the party who had taken General Kelly from his bed at the St. Nicholas, and in a little while they were out beyond the confines of Cumberland. The countersign, Bull's Gap, now stood them in hand, and they got a start before the alarm was spread. They reached Romney without any trouble, except an exchange of shots with a handful of cavalry that had got together and pursued them.
Oakland, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.25
Capture of generals Crook and Kelly of the Federal army. One of the Coolest deeds on record. General Benjamin F. Kelly, of West Virginia, who died July 16, 1891, near Oakland, Md., was captured with General Crook at Cumberland, Md., during February, 1864, by a detachment of Neill's Rangers, led by Dr. J. L. Vandiver, a veterinarian, who resides at Millwood, Clarke county. It was one of the most daring episodes of the war, as Cumberland was then occupied and surrounded by eight thousand Federal troops. John Fay and Sprigg Lynn, who were members of Neill's command, lived in that city, and had been in the habit of making trips there. They suggested the plan, which was carried out by Vandiver, who had under his charge fifty-seven men. The story often narrated by Vandiver, is briefly summed up as follows: General Crook had just been assigned to the command of the department which embraced Cumberland, and had relieved the late General B. F. Kelly. General Kelly had not yet lef
Cumberland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.25
Capture of generals Crook and Kelly of the Federal army. One of the Coolest deeds on record. General Benjamin F. Kelly, of West Virginia, who died July 16, 1891, near Oakland, Md., was captured with General Crook at Cumberland, Md., during February, 1864, by a detachment of Neill's Rangers, led by Dr. J. L. Vandiver, a veterinarian, who resides at Millwood, Clarke county. It was one of the most daring episodes of the war, as Cumberland was then occupied and surrounded by eight thousand Federal troops. John Fay and Sprigg Lynn, who were members of Neill's command, lived in that city, and had been in the habit of making trips there. They suggested the plan, which was carried out by Vandiver, who had under his charge fifty-seven men. The story often narrated by Vandiver, is briefly summed up as follows: General Crook had just been assigned to the command of the department which embraced Cumberland, and had relieved the late General B. F. Kelly. General Kelly had not yet le
Millwood (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.25
Capture of generals Crook and Kelly of the Federal army. One of the Coolest deeds on record. General Benjamin F. Kelly, of West Virginia, who died July 16, 1891, near Oakland, Md., was captured with General Crook at Cumberland, Md., during February, 1864, by a detachment of Neill's Rangers, led by Dr. J. L. Vandiver, a veterinarian, who resides at Millwood, Clarke county. It was one of the most daring episodes of the war, as Cumberland was then occupied and surrounded by eight thousand Federal troops. John Fay and Sprigg Lynn, who were members of Neill's command, lived in that city, and had been in the habit of making trips there. They suggested the plan, which was carried out by Vandiver, who had under his charge fifty-seven men. The story often narrated by Vandiver, is briefly summed up as follows: General Crook had just been assigned to the command of the department which embraced Cumberland, and had relieved the late General B. F. Kelly. General Kelly had not yet le
Keyeser (Wisconsin, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.25
them, broke their guns, and, as Vandiver said, frightened them almost to death by telling them that the city of Cumberland was surrounded, and that by morning their generals would be captured. He told his prisoners that on account of the depth of the snow he could not take them with him, but each agreed to take a verbal parole. They then rode deliberately into the town as cool as though they were Union troops, and, when accosted, informed the inquiring soldiers that they were scouts from New Creek. Vandiver himself took the responsibility of securing General Crook from the Revere House, and to the well-known Kuykendall was assigned the duty of securing the person of General Kelly. Kuykendall took six men, and at 3:30 o'clock in the morning the scouts dismounted and coolly entered the St. Nicholas. They found General Kelly in bed and Kuykendall, who was known to General Kelly, having been captured previously, recognized him at once and demanded his surrender. The General desir
Benjamin F. Kelly (search for this): chapter 1.25
Capture of generals Crook and Kelly of the Federal army. One of the Coolest deeds on record. General Benjamin F. Kelly, of West Virginia, who died July 16, 1891, near Oakland, Md., was captured with General Crook at Cumberland, Md., during February, 1864, by a detachment of Neill's Rangers, led by Dr. J. L. Vandiver, a vetGeneral Benjamin F. Kelly, of West Virginia, who died July 16, 1891, near Oakland, Md., was captured with General Crook at Cumberland, Md., during February, 1864, by a detachment of Neill's Rangers, led by Dr. J. L. Vandiver, a veterinarian, who resides at Millwood, Clarke county. It was one of the most daring episodes of the war, as Cumberland was then occupied and surrounded by eight thousand Federal troops. John Fay and Sprigg Lynn, who were members of Neill's command, lived in that city, and had been in the habit of making trips there. They suggested briefly summed up as follows: General Crook had just been assigned to the command of the department which embraced Cumberland, and had relieved the late General B. F. Kelly. General Kelly had not yet left the city, and was stopping at the St. Nicholas Hotel, while General Crook had his headquarters at the Revere House. On that
took the responsibility of securing General Crook from the Revere House, and to the well-known Kuykendall was assigned the duty of securing the person of General Kelly. Kuykendall took six men, and aKuykendall took six men, and at 3:30 o'clock in the morning the scouts dismounted and coolly entered the St. Nicholas. They found General Kelly in bed and Kuykendall, who was known to General Kelly, having been captured previousKuykendall, who was known to General Kelly, having been captured previously, recognized him at once and demanded his surrender. The General desired to know whom he was surrendering to, and Kuykendall emphatically informed him that it was to him, Kuykendall, and him only, Kuykendall emphatically informed him that it was to him, Kuykendall, and him only, and told him further that there was no time for ceremony. The General accepted the position and promptly obeyed. Vandiver in the meantime had repaired to the Revere House, captured the sentinel inKuykendall, and him only, and told him further that there was no time for ceremony. The General accepted the position and promptly obeyed. Vandiver in the meantime had repaired to the Revere House, captured the sentinel in charge by pretending to be a dispatch-bearer to General Crook, and finally succeeded in reaching his bed-room. He announced himself to the astonished General as General Rosser, of the Confederate ar
B. F. Kelly (search for this): chapter 1.25
of the department which embraced Cumberland, and had relieved the late General B. F. Kelly. General Kelly had not yet left the city, and was stopping at the St. Nicholas Hotel, while General Crook hvere House, and to the well-known Kuykendall was assigned the duty of securing the person of General Kelly. Kuykendall took six men, and at 3:30 o'clock in the morning the scouts dismounted and coolly entered the St. Nicholas. They found General Kelly in bed and Kuykendall, who was known to General Kelly, having been captured previously, recognized him at once and demanded his surrender. TheGeneral Kelly, having been captured previously, recognized him at once and demanded his surrender. The General desired to know whom he was surrendering to, and Kuykendall emphatically informed him that it was to him, Kuykendall, and him only, and told him further that there was no time for ceremony. as placed on the horse behind him. They rode down and were joined by the party who had taken General Kelly from his bed at the St. Nicholas, and in a little while they were out beyond the confines of
Capture of generals Crook and Kelly of the Federal army. One of the Coolest deeds on record. General Benjamin F. Kelly, of West Virginia, who died July 16, 1891, near Oakland, Md., was captured with General Crook at Cumberland, Md., during February, 1864, by a detachment of Neill's Rangers, led by Dr. J. L. Vandiver, a v. The story often narrated by Vandiver, is briefly summed up as follows: General Crook had just been assigned to the command of the department which embraced Cumbad not yet left the city, and was stopping at the St. Nicholas Hotel, while General Crook had his headquarters at the Revere House. On that February night they sleputs from New Creek. Vandiver himself took the responsibility of securing General Crook from the Revere House, and to the well-known Kuykendall was assigned the due, captured the sentinel in charge by pretending to be a dispatch-bearer to General Crook, and finally succeeded in reaching his bed-room. He announced himself to t
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