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Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.37
p effect upon her and affected her health. During the latter part of her life her chief pleasure was found in contemplating the portraits of her sons and General Hill and war relics in her possession, of which she had a large number. Mrs. Morgan's husband, Calvin C. Morgan, was a brother of Samuel D. Morgan, of Nashville, one of the first merchants of that city. When driven further South by the Federal occupancy of Nashville, Samuel devoted a great deal of time and money to the aid of Tennessee and Kentucky soldiers in the hospitals. Calvin was a highly cultivated and educated man and well known throughout Kentucky. Mrs. Morgan herself was universally beloved. She was widely known and esteemed, and thoroughly unselfish, with a disposition that endeared her to all with whom she came in contact. Her death causes widespread regret. Mrs. Duke has gone to Lexington, and General Duke will follow to-day. The funeral will take place from the family residence in Lexington to-mor
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.37
r life her chief pleasure was found in contemplating the portraits of her sons and General Hill and war relics in her possession, of which she had a large number. Mrs. Morgan's husband, Calvin C. Morgan, was a brother of Samuel D. Morgan, of Nashville, one of the first merchants of that city. When driven further South by the Federal occupancy of Nashville, Samuel devoted a great deal of time and money to the aid of Tennessee and Kentucky soldiers in the hospitals. Calvin was a highly cultiNashville, Samuel devoted a great deal of time and money to the aid of Tennessee and Kentucky soldiers in the hospitals. Calvin was a highly cultivated and educated man and well known throughout Kentucky. Mrs. Morgan herself was universally beloved. She was widely known and esteemed, and thoroughly unselfish, with a disposition that endeared her to all with whom she came in contact. Her death causes widespread regret. Mrs. Duke has gone to Lexington, and General Duke will follow to-day. The funeral will take place from the family residence in Lexington to-morrow afternoon at 4 o'clock, the interment being in the cemetery where G
Louisville (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.37
Mrs. Henrietta H. Morgan. [from the Louisville, Ky., courier Journal, September 9, 1891.] Death of a mother of soldiers. The death of Mrs. Henrietta H. Morgan, of Lexington, which occurred in that city on Monday, September 7, 1891, removes from life a woman who, while not having an eventful career, as the world goes, neverte to accumulate a fortune of one million dollars. At his death he left a large estate to be divided among a large family. Mr. A. D. Hunt, formerly a banker in Louisville, but later of New Orleans; Colonel Thomas H. Hunt, once a leading merchant here; Dr. Robert Hunt, formerly of Louisville, but later of New Orleans, and Frank K.Louisville, but later of New Orleans, and Frank K. Hunt, of Lexington, were her brothers. Mrs. Hanna, of Frankfort; Mrs. Strother, of St. Louis; Mrs. Reynolds, of Frankfort, were her sisters. The latter was the mother of J. W. Hunt Reynolds, the once noted turfman and horse owner. Her children numbered six sons and two daughters. One of the daughters was the wife of General
Frankfort (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.37
merly a banker in Louisville, but later of New Orleans; Colonel Thomas H. Hunt, once a leading merchant here; Dr. Robert Hunt, formerly of Louisville, but later of New Orleans, and Frank K. Hunt, of Lexington, were her brothers. Mrs. Hanna, of Frankfort; Mrs. Strother, of St. Louis; Mrs. Reynolds, of Frankfort, were her sisters. The latter was the mother of J. W. Hunt Reynolds, the once noted turfman and horse owner. Her children numbered six sons and two daughters. One of the daughters wFrankfort, were her sisters. The latter was the mother of J. W. Hunt Reynolds, the once noted turfman and horse owner. Her children numbered six sons and two daughters. One of the daughters was the wife of General A. P. Hill, of Virginia, and the other married General Basil W. Duke, of this city. Her sons were General John H. Morgan, Calvin C., Richard C., Charlton H., Thomas H. and Frank H. Morgan. All of them, and her two sons-in-law, entered the Confederate army, and of the number her most famous son, General John H. Morgan, Tom Morgan and General Hill were killed in battle, or rather the great cavalry leader was shot down at Greenville, Tenn., after surrender. All the others
Greenville, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.37
and two daughters. One of the daughters was the wife of General A. P. Hill, of Virginia, and the other married General Basil W. Duke, of this city. Her sons were General John H. Morgan, Calvin C., Richard C., Charlton H., Thomas H. and Frank H. Morgan. All of them, and her two sons-in-law, entered the Confederate army, and of the number her most famous son, General John H. Morgan, Tom Morgan and General Hill were killed in battle, or rather the great cavalry leader was shot down at Greenville, Tenn., after surrender. All the others were wounded at various times, and all were prisoners during the course of the war. Tom was but seventeen years old when he enlisted in the Second Kentucky Infantry at Camp Boone. He was transferred from that regiment to the command of his brother, the general, and was but nineteen years old when he was killed. Frank, the youngest, was but fifteen when he enlisted. Calvin, Dick and Charlton were all officers, and there was not one among them who di
Frank H. Morgan (search for this): chapter 1.37
ngton, were her brothers. Mrs. Hanna, of Frankfort; Mrs. Strother, of St. Louis; Mrs. Reynolds, of Frankfort, were her sisters. The latter was the mother of J. W. Hunt Reynolds, the once noted turfman and horse owner. Her children numbered six sons and two daughters. One of the daughters was the wife of General A. P. Hill, of Virginia, and the other married General Basil W. Duke, of this city. Her sons were General John H. Morgan, Calvin C., Richard C., Charlton H., Thomas H. and Frank H. Morgan. All of them, and her two sons-in-law, entered the Confederate army, and of the number her most famous son, General John H. Morgan, Tom Morgan and General Hill were killed in battle, or rather the great cavalry leader was shot down at Greenville, Tenn., after surrender. All the others were wounded at various times, and all were prisoners during the course of the war. Tom was but seventeen years old when he enlisted in the Second Kentucky Infantry at Camp Boone. He was transferred fro
Her children numbered six sons and two daughters. One of the daughters was the wife of General A. P. Hill, of Virginia, and the other married General Basil W. Duke, of this city. Her sons were General John H. Morgan, Calvin C., Richard C., Charlton H., Thomas H. and Frank H. Morgan. All of them, and her two sons-in-law, entered the Confederate army, and of the number her most famous son, General John H. Morgan, Tom Morgan and General Hill were killed in battle, or rather the great cavalryond Kentucky Infantry at Camp Boone. He was transferred from that regiment to the command of his brother, the general, and was but nineteen years old when he was killed. Frank, the youngest, was but fifteen when he enlisted. Calvin, Dick and Charlton were all officers, and there was not one among them who did not do his duty. Mrs. Morgan was devoted to the Confederate cause, and the death of her sons and son-in-law had a deep effect upon her and affected her health. During the latter par
ed in battle, or rather the great cavalry leader was shot down at Greenville, Tenn., after surrender. All the others were wounded at various times, and all were prisoners during the course of the war. Tom was but seventeen years old when he enlisted in the Second Kentucky Infantry at Camp Boone. He was transferred from that regiment to the command of his brother, the general, and was but nineteen years old when he was killed. Frank, the youngest, was but fifteen when he enlisted. Calvin, Dick and Charlton were all officers, and there was not one among them who did not do his duty. Mrs. Morgan was devoted to the Confederate cause, and the death of her sons and son-in-law had a deep effect upon her and affected her health. During the latter part of her life her chief pleasure was found in contemplating the portraits of her sons and General Hill and war relics in her possession, of which she had a large number. Mrs. Morgan's husband, Calvin C. Morgan, was a brother of Samuel D
Basil W. Duke (search for this): chapter 1.37
se owner. Her children numbered six sons and two daughters. One of the daughters was the wife of General A. P. Hill, of Virginia, and the other married General Basil W. Duke, of this city. Her sons were General John H. Morgan, Calvin C., Richard C., Charlton H., Thomas H. and Frank H. Morgan. All of them, and her two sons-in- known and esteemed, and thoroughly unselfish, with a disposition that endeared her to all with whom she came in contact. Her death causes widespread regret. Mrs. Duke has gone to Lexington, and General Duke will follow to-day. The funeral will take place from the family residence in Lexington to-morrow afternoon at 4 o'clock,eared her to all with whom she came in contact. Her death causes widespread regret. Mrs. Duke has gone to Lexington, and General Duke will follow to-day. The funeral will take place from the family residence in Lexington to-morrow afternoon at 4 o'clock, the interment being in the cemetery where General Morgan's remains rest.
he last few years had not been in good health. The immediate cause of her death was a stroke of paralysis, which, had it not been for a more than usually enfeebled condition, would probably have affected her but little. Mrs. Morgan was the daughter of Mr. John W. Hunt, of Lexington, who was one of Kentncky's most prosperous merchants, and the first man in the State to accumulate a fortune of one million dollars. At his death he left a large estate to be divided among a large family. Mr. A. D. Hunt, formerly a banker in Louisville, but later of New Orleans; Colonel Thomas H. Hunt, once a leading merchant here; Dr. Robert Hunt, formerly of Louisville, but later of New Orleans, and Frank K. Hunt, of Lexington, were her brothers. Mrs. Hanna, of Frankfort; Mrs. Strother, of St. Louis; Mrs. Reynolds, of Frankfort, were her sisters. The latter was the mother of J. W. Hunt Reynolds, the once noted turfman and horse owner. Her children numbered six sons and two daughters. One of the
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