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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Thomas Jordan (search for this): chapter 1.57
and evening had prayers in his tent as if he were the chaplain, instead of the general, of the army. This extraordinary character, produced an impression upon his soldiers which remains to this day, of which a gentleman of this city furnishes us an illustration. It is Mr. W. P. St. John, the president of the Mercantile Bank of New York, who relates the following incident in his own experience: A year or two since he was on a business errand in the Shenandoah Valley in company with General Thomas Jordan, chief of staff to General Beauregard in the Confederate army, and at the close of the day they found themselves at the foot of the mountains in a wild and lonely place, where there was no village, and not even a house save a rough shanty for the use of the track-walker on the railroad. It was not an attractive shade for rest, but rather suggestive of the suspicious character that lurk in out of the way places, yet here they were forced to pass the night, and could find no shelter b
if he were the chaplain, instead of the general, of the army. This extraordinary character, produced an impression upon his soldiers which remains to this day, of which a gentleman of this city furnishes us an illustration. It is Mr. W. P. St. John, the president of the Mercantile Bank of New York, who relates the following incident in his own experience: A year or two since he was on a business errand in the Shenandoah Valley in company with General Thomas Jordan, chief of staff to General Beauregard in the Confederate army, and at the close of the day they found themselves at the foot of the mountains in a wild and lonely place, where there was no village, and not even a house save a rough shanty for the use of the track-walker on the railroad. It was not an attractive shade for rest, but rather suggestive of the suspicious character that lurk in out of the way places, yet here they were forced to pass the night, and could find no shelter but this solitary cabin, in which they sa
W. P. Saint John (search for this): chapter 1.57
personality of a man, for the like of whom we must go back to the times of Cromwell. He might have been one of Cromwell's ironsides, who feared no one but God, since he made war with tremendous vigor, and yet morning and evening had prayers in his tent as if he were the chaplain, instead of the general, of the army. This extraordinary character, produced an impression upon his soldiers which remains to this day, of which a gentleman of this city furnishes us an illustration. It is Mr. W. P. St. John, the president of the Mercantile Bank of New York, who relates the following incident in his own experience: A year or two since he was on a business errand in the Shenandoah Valley in company with General Thomas Jordan, chief of staff to General Beauregard in the Confederate army, and at the close of the day they found themselves at the foot of the mountains in a wild and lonely place, where there was no village, and not even a house save a rough shanty for the use of the track-walker
Stonewall Jackson (search for this): chapter 1.57
One who was out with old Stonewall. The moral influence of General Jackson. The issue of a new Life of Stonewall Jackson, from the pen of his wife, recalls attention to the remarkable personality of a man, for the like of whom we must go back to the times of Cromwell. He might have been one of Cromwell's ironsides, who fStonewall Jackson, from the pen of his wife, recalls attention to the remarkable personality of a man, for the like of whom we must go back to the times of Cromwell. He might have been one of Cromwell's ironsides, who feared no one but God, since he made war with tremendous vigor, and yet morning and evening had prayers in his tent as if he were the chaplain, instead of the general, of the army. This extraordinary character, produced an impression upon his soldiers which remains to this day, of which a gentleman of this city furnishes us an ill We sat in silence, and as soon as I could recover myself I whispered to my friend, Who can he be? to which he answered, I don't know, but he must be one of Stonewall Jackson's old soldiers. And he was! As we walked out into the open air I accosted our new acquaintance and, after a few questions about the country, asked: Were yo
Oliver Cromwell (search for this): chapter 1.57
old Stonewall. The moral influence of General Jackson. The issue of a new Life of Stonewall Jackson, from the pen of his wife, recalls attention to the remarkable personality of a man, for the like of whom we must go back to the times of Cromwell. He might have been one of Cromwell's ironsides, who feared no one but God, since he made war with tremendous vigor, and yet morning and evening had prayers in his tent as if he were the chaplain, instead of the general, of the army. This extCromwell's ironsides, who feared no one but God, since he made war with tremendous vigor, and yet morning and evening had prayers in his tent as if he were the chaplain, instead of the general, of the army. This extraordinary character, produced an impression upon his soldiers which remains to this day, of which a gentleman of this city furnishes us an illustration. It is Mr. W. P. St. John, the president of the Mercantile Bank of New York, who relates the following incident in his own experience: A year or two since he was on a business errand in the Shenandoah Valley in company with General Thomas Jordan, chief of staff to General Beauregard in the Confederate army, and at the close of the day they foun