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were a part of Lane's North Carolina brigade, Walker's supernumerary artillerists of A. P. Hill's corps, armed as infantry, and a part of Chew's Maryland battery. Harris' brigade and a few pieces of artillery occupied Fort Alexander (Whitworth), which was to the rear of Fort Gregg and higher up the Appomattox; and that fort was evacuated, the infantry and artillery retiring to the inner line of works before Fort Gregg was attacked in force. I have letters from Lieutenants Snow, Craige, Howard and Rigler, who were in Gregg when it fell, and these officers estimate the number of Harris' brigade in that fort at not more than twenty, including a Lieutenant-Colonel Duncan and his adjutant, while they estimate the numbers from my brigade to have been at least three-fourths the entire force. It is not my desire to enter into any lengthy discussion regarding the gallant infantry defenders of Fort Gregg—one of the crowning acts of the war—but I will speak for the artillery, for, of it
Jubal A. Early (search for this): chapter 1.9
he previous day—Major Gibbes having been severely wounded and rendered unfit for duty. Here we remained until November 6th, when we were relieved by Lieutenant-Colonel Moseley's battalion, and were ordered to a position on the Boydton plankroad, between the city and Hatcher's Run. We were assigned to do the light artillery work of A. P. Hill's corps; and several times during the winter we were moved out in snow and sleet to counteract Grant's flanking movements around our right. After Early's misfortunes in the Valley, and the return to the main army at Petersburg of the remnant of his troops under Gordon, two of my batteries were broken up, and the guns taken to equip those of Gordon, who had left theirs at Fisher's Hill. I was then promoted to the rank of lieutenant-colonel of artillery, and assigned, March 25, 1865, to a battalion commanded by Colonel McIntosh, as second field-officer, and placed in command of the lines in the vicinity of Fort Gregg, making my headquarters
James H. Lane (search for this): chapter 1.9
n Historical Society Papers (XVIII) sent me several communications from General James H. Lane in reference to the actions of his brigade on different fields and and nd again the credit of the artillery is given to Chew's Maryland battery. General Lane in a letter to you dated September 17, 1890, writes (Southern Historical Mage, Volume XVIII, page 80): The true defenders at Fort Gregg were a part of Lane's North Carolina brigade, Walker's supernumerary artillerists of A. P. Hill's coanother work, called Fort Whitworth (not Alexander, as erroneously called by General Lane). These two forts—or, as they really were, simple earthworks—were to have becannoneers, and to the right and left, along the entrenchments, were infantry of Lane's and Thomas's commands, I believe, stationed several yards apart. As we walke. For many years—a quarter of a century—it has been claimed by Pollard and General Lane that Chew's battery participated in the defence of Gregg. It is full time
George S. Thomas (search for this): chapter 1.9
merged from the Gregg house, where we had tried to get a night's rest, but had been kept awake by the terrible noise of the cannonading in front of the city, to say nothing of our anxiety in regard to the right of the army, that we had heard. had been overwhelmed at Five Forks the evening before. McElroy was in Gregg with his dismounted artillerists; Battles was in Owen with his two guns and their cannoneers, and to the right and left, along the entrenchments, were infantry of Lane's and Thomas's commands, I believe, stationed several yards apart. As we walked towards the front line we heard what appeared to be a scattering skirmish firing off to our right; presently infantrymen began crossing the field to the rear hurriedly, our cannoneers laughing and saying, They are chasing rabbits. Presently a cannon-shot was fired from the direction in which we had heard the musketry, and a solid shot plowed up the ground in front of our guns. We then knew our lines had been broken and t
t of Lane's North Carolina brigade, Walker's supernumerary artillerists of A. P. Hill's corps, armed as infantry, and a part of Chew's Maryland battery. Harris' brigade and a few pieces of artillery occupied Fort Alexander (Whitworth), which was to the rear of Fort Gregg and higher up the Appomattox; and that fort was evacuated, the infantry and artillery retiring to the inner line of works before Fort Gregg was attacked in force. I have letters from Lieutenants Snow, Craige, Howard and Rigler, who were in Gregg when it fell, and these officers estimate the number of Harris' brigade in that fort at not more than twenty, including a Lieutenant-Colonel Duncan and his adjutant, while they estimate the numbers from my brigade to have been at least three-fourths the entire force. It is not my desire to enter into any lengthy discussion regarding the gallant infantry defenders of Fort Gregg—one of the crowning acts of the war—but I will speak for the artillery, for, of its actors, i
Frank McElroy (search for this): chapter 1.9
rwhelmed at Five Forks the evening before. McElroy was in Gregg with his dismounted artilleristsarp lookout, I went over to Gregg to see that McElroy was all right, and thence to the Gregg House d possessing themselves of his two guns. But McElroy opened upon them with his little force, and tthe retiring enemy. I wish I knew his name. McElroy immediately took possession of Battles' guns,ssible. The horses having been brought up, McElroy, by my orders, moved down the road towards thhe two forts—Gregg and Whitworth. I directed McElroy to pile up all the canister that was in the lnally became of them I never heard. Seeing McElroy and his men all ready, and Harris on his way awn. He then ordered me to go and withdraw McElroy from Gregg, and Lieutenant Richard Walke, of tly the rushes of the enemy, the discharge of McElroy's guns when the enemy was almost up to their ny Washington Artillery, commanded by Lieutenant Frank McElroy of the third company of the Washingto[2 more...]
General Lane in a letter to you dated September 17, 1890, writes (Southern Historical Magazine, Volume XVIII, page 80): The true defenders at Fort Gregg were a part of Lane's North Carolina brigade, Walker's supernumerary artillerists of A. P. Hill's corps, armed as infantry, and a part of Chew's Maryland battery. Harris' brigade and a few pieces of artillery occupied Fort Alexander (Whitworth), which was to the rear of Fort Gregg and higher up the Appomattox; and that fort was evacuare we remained until November 6th, when we were relieved by Lieutenant-Colonel Moseley's battalion, and were ordered to a position on the Boydton plankroad, between the city and Hatcher's Run. We were assigned to do the light artillery work of A. P. Hill's corps; and several times during the winter we were moved out in snow and sleet to counteract Grant's flanking movements around our right. After Early's misfortunes in the Valley, and the return to the main army at Petersburg of the remnant
Lindsey Walker (search for this): chapter 1.9
, page 80): The true defenders at Fort Gregg were a part of Lane's North Carolina brigade, Walker's supernumerary artillerists of A. P. Hill's corps, armed as infantry, and a part of Chew's Marady, and Harris on his way to occupy the forts, I rode to report the state of affairs to General Lindsey Walker, chief of artillery, at Battery 45, across the ravine before alluded to, and where I hade was a battery of four pieces of artillery in Whitworth—whose, I do not know. When I saw General Walker, and made my report and suggestions, he said that all of his batteries were engaged and that Upon reaching the Gregg house I met General Wilcox, and told him what my orders were from General Walker. He said, with much emphasis: The guns must remain; the forts must be held to the last extrnate (or unfortunate) at Whitworth than I was at Gregg, and withdrew the guns, as ordered by General Walker. The enemy were now advancing to the attack, and Gregg, being surrounded, was finally tak
n the trenches before Petersburg, Va., with the Washington Artillery, of New Orleans, I received an order from General Pendleton, the chief of artillery of the Army of Northern Virginia, detaching me from that command and placing me in command of Gibbes' battalion of three batteries, then in position just to the right of the crater caused by the explosion of the mine on the previous day—Major Gibbes having been severely wounded and rendered unfit for duty. Here we remained until November 6th,Major Gibbes having been severely wounded and rendered unfit for duty. Here we remained until November 6th, when we were relieved by Lieutenant-Colonel Moseley's battalion, and were ordered to a position on the Boydton plankroad, between the city and Hatcher's Run. We were assigned to do the light artillery work of A. P. Hill's corps; and several times during the winter we were moved out in snow and sleet to counteract Grant's flanking movements around our right. After Early's misfortunes in the Valley, and the return to the main army at Petersburg of the remnant of his troops under Gordon, two o
John B. Gordon (search for this): chapter 1.9
al times during the winter we were moved out in snow and sleet to counteract Grant's flanking movements around our right. After Early's misfortunes in the Valley, and the return to the main army at Petersburg of the remnant of his troops under Gordon, two of my batteries were broken up, and the guns taken to equip those of Gordon, who had left theirs at Fisher's Hill. I was then promoted to the rank of lieutenant-colonel of artillery, and assigned, March 25, 1865, to a battalion commanded byGordon, who had left theirs at Fisher's Hill. I was then promoted to the rank of lieutenant-colonel of artillery, and assigned, March 25, 1865, to a battalion commanded by Colonel McIntosh, as second field-officer, and placed in command of the lines in the vicinity of Fort Gregg, making my headquarters in what was known as the Gregg House, within a hundred yards or so of the fort. Between Fort Gregg and the lines immediately around the city was a deep ravine with a small creek flowing through it. To utilize this ravine and water a large dam was built, which caused, by an accumulation of water in front of the line of works, an additional obstruction to the adva
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