hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Ulysses S. Grant 368 0 Browse Search
Fitz Lee 306 2 Browse Search
D. H. Hill 305 15 Browse Search
Stonewall Jackson 215 1 Browse Search
Robert E. Lee 150 0 Browse Search
Custis Lee 138 2 Browse Search
John B. Gordon 135 3 Browse Search
United States (United States) 122 0 Browse Search
James Longstreet 120 2 Browse Search
R. E. Lee 112 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

Found 30 total hits in 13 results.

1 2
May, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 1.38
War's bravest deeds. [from the Richmond, Va., dispatch, January 30, 1894.] The heroism of private Chew Coleman, of Crenshaw's Battery, at Spotsylvania Courthouse, May, 1864. In the desperate battle of Spotsylvania Courthouse, in May, 1864, when Grant and Lee were approaching Richmond on parallel lines, the Crenshaw Battery, of Pegram's Battalion, Army of Northern Virginia, was ordered by General Harry Heth to change its position to another part of the field. While the guns were being May, 1864, when Grant and Lee were approaching Richmond on parallel lines, the Crenshaw Battery, of Pegram's Battalion, Army of Northern Virginia, was ordered by General Harry Heth to change its position to another part of the field. While the guns were being limbered up, General Jubal Early rode up and asked the captain of the company where he was going. The captain pointed to the position assigned him, when General Early asked him who had ordered him to go there. The captain replied, General Heth. Well, says General Early, if he has ordered you there, you would better go, but I don't see how you will ever get there. 'Twas a pretty warm place to have called forth such a remark from General Early. The guns were pulled out, the cannoneers mou
January 30th, 1894 AD (search for this): chapter 1.38
War's bravest deeds. [from the Richmond, Va., dispatch, January 30, 1894.] The heroism of private Chew Coleman, of Crenshaw's Battery, at Spotsylvania Courthouse, May, 1864. In the desperate battle of Spotsylvania Courthouse, in May, 1864, when Grant and Lee were approaching Richmond on parallel lines, the Crenshaw Battery, of Pegram's Battalion, Army of Northern Virginia, was ordered by General Harry Heth to change its position to another part of the field. While the guns were being limbered up, General Jubal Early rode up and asked the captain of the company where he was going. The captain pointed to the position assigned him, when General Early asked him who had ordered him to go there. The captain replied, General Heth. Well, says General Early, if he has ordered you there, you would better go, but I don't see how you will ever get there. 'Twas a pretty warm place to have called forth such a remark from General Early. The guns were pulled out, the cannoneers mount
Chew Coleman (search for this): chapter 1.38
War's bravest deeds. [from the Richmond, Va., dispatch, January 30, 1894.] The heroism of private Chew Coleman, of Crenshaw's Battery, at Spotsylvania Courthouse, May, 1864. In the desperate battle of Spotsylvania Courthouse, in May, 1864, when Grant and Lee were approaching Richmond on parallel lines, the Crenshaw Battery, of Pegram's Battalion, Army of Northern Virginia, was ordered by General Harry Heth to change its position to another part of the field. While the guns were being lchest of the caisson, and the heat set fire to the next one, but it did not explode immediately. The driver of the lead team, in his fright, tumbled from his horse, and the team made straight for the enemy's lines. The wheel driver, however (Chew Coleman, of Spotsylvania, by name), kept his seat, although next to the exploded chest, and the heat set fire to his jacket, which burned through to the skin, and, notwithstanding the flesh was crisping up, and he was suffering the most excruciating p
Jubal Early (search for this): chapter 1.38
by General Harry Heth to change its position to another part of the field. While the guns were being limbered up, General Jubal Early rode up and asked the captain of the company where he was going. The captain pointed to the position assigned him, when General Early asked him who had ordered him to go there. The captain replied, General Heth. Well, says General Early, if he has ordered you there, you would better go, but I don't see how you will ever get there. 'Twas a pretty warm place General Early, if he has ordered you there, you would better go, but I don't see how you will ever get there. 'Twas a pretty warm place to have called forth such a remark from General Early. The guns were pulled out, the cannoneers mounted, and the horses went galloping down a lane formed by a row of cedars on each side to the new position assigned the battery. Notwithstanding General Early. The guns were pulled out, the cannoneers mounted, and the horses went galloping down a lane formed by a row of cedars on each side to the new position assigned the battery. Notwithstanding the company faced three Federal batteries of six guns each, which had an enfilade of fire on us for probably four hundred yards, for some unaccountable reason we escaped injury until we had gotten within six hundred yards of the enemy's batteries, w
Ulysses S. Grant (search for this): chapter 1.38
War's bravest deeds. [from the Richmond, Va., dispatch, January 30, 1894.] The heroism of private Chew Coleman, of Crenshaw's Battery, at Spotsylvania Courthouse, May, 1864. In the desperate battle of Spotsylvania Courthouse, in May, 1864, when Grant and Lee were approaching Richmond on parallel lines, the Crenshaw Battery, of Pegram's Battalion, Army of Northern Virginia, was ordered by General Harry Heth to change its position to another part of the field. While the guns were being limbered up, General Jubal Early rode up and asked the captain of the company where he was going. The captain pointed to the position assigned him, when General Early asked him who had ordered him to go there. The captain replied, General Heth. Well, says General Early, if he has ordered you there, you would better go, but I don't see how you will ever get there. 'Twas a pretty warm place to have called forth such a remark from General Early. The guns were pulled out, the cannoneers moun
urthouse, May, 1864. In the desperate battle of Spotsylvania Courthouse, in May, 1864, when Grant and Lee were approaching Richmond on parallel lines, the Crenshaw Battery, of Pegram's Battalion, Army of Northern Virginia, was ordered by General Harry Heth to change its position to another part of the field. While the guns were being limbered up, General Jubal Early rode up and asked the captain of the company where he was going. The captain pointed to the position assigned him, when General Early asked him who had ordered him to go there. The captain replied, General Heth. Well, says General Early, if he has ordered you there, you would better go, but I don't see how you will ever get there. 'Twas a pretty warm place to have called forth such a remark from General Early. The guns were pulled out, the cannoneers mounted, and the horses went galloping down a lane formed by a row of cedars on each side to the new position assigned the battery. Notwithstanding the company fac
War's bravest deeds. [from the Richmond, Va., dispatch, January 30, 1894.] The heroism of private Chew Coleman, of Crenshaw's Battery, at Spotsylvania Courthouse, May, 1864. In the desperate battle of Spotsylvania Courthouse, in May, 1864, when Grant and Lee were approaching Richmond on parallel lines, the Crenshaw Battery, of Pegram's Battalion, Army of Northern Virginia, was ordered by General Harry Heth to change its position to another part of the field. While the guns were being limbered up, General Jubal Early rode up and asked the captain of the company where he was going. The captain pointed to the position assigned him, when General Early asked him who had ordered him to go there. The captain replied, General Heth. Well, says General Early, if he has ordered you there, you would better go, but I don't see how you will ever get there. 'Twas a pretty warm place to have called forth such a remark from General Early. The guns were pulled out, the cannoneers moun
William J. Pegram (search for this): chapter 1.38
War's bravest deeds. [from the Richmond, Va., dispatch, January 30, 1894.] The heroism of private Chew Coleman, of Crenshaw's Battery, at Spotsylvania Courthouse, May, 1864. In the desperate battle of Spotsylvania Courthouse, in May, 1864, when Grant and Lee were approaching Richmond on parallel lines, the Crenshaw Battery, of Pegram's Battalion, Army of Northern Virginia, was ordered by General Harry Heth to change its position to another part of the field. While the guns were being limbered up, General Jubal Early rode up and asked the captain of the company where he was going. The captain pointed to the position assigned him, when General Early asked him who had ordered him to go there. The captain replied, General Heth. Well, says General Early, if he has ordered you there, you would better go, but I don't see how you will ever get there. 'Twas a pretty warm place to have called forth such a remark from General Early. The guns were pulled out, the cannoneers mount
Appomattox (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.38
enemy's lines. The wheel driver, however (Chew Coleman, of Spotsylvania, by name), kept his seat, although next to the exploded chest, and the heat set fire to his jacket, which burned through to the skin, and, notwithstanding the flesh was crisping up, and he was suffering the most excruciating pain, he did not let go the reins, but stopped the horses, thereby preventing them from taking the team into the enemy's lines. He then fell or jumped from his horse nearly exhausted. While this was going on two or three of the cannoneers jumped between the exploded ammunition chest (which was now harmless) and the one on fire and unlimbered it and got out of the way before the fire communicated with the powder, which occurred two or three seconds after, when up went the other two chests with a terrific noise. These I regard as the bravest exploits that came under my observation in the four years of the war—from Bethel to Appomattox. Charles P. Young, Late of Crenshaw Battery, C. S.
Crenshaw (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.38
War's bravest deeds. [from the Richmond, Va., dispatch, January 30, 1894.] The heroism of private Chew Coleman, of Crenshaw's Battery, at Spotsylvania Courthouse, May, 1864. In the desperate battle of Spotsylvania Courthouse, in May, 1864, when Grant and Lee were approaching Richmond on parallel lines, the Crenshaw Battery, of Pegram's Battalion, Army of Northern Virginia, was ordered by General Harry Heth to change its position to another part of the field. While the guns were being lCrenshaw Battery, of Pegram's Battalion, Army of Northern Virginia, was ordered by General Harry Heth to change its position to another part of the field. While the guns were being limbered up, General Jubal Early rode up and asked the captain of the company where he was going. The captain pointed to the position assigned him, when General Early asked him who had ordered him to go there. The captain replied, General Heth. Well, says General Early, if he has ordered you there, you would better go, but I don't see how you will ever get there. 'Twas a pretty warm place to have called forth such a remark from General Early. The guns were pulled out, the cannoneers mount
1 2