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Jackson made a vigorous attack on Shields at Kernstown for its recovery, but for paucity of numbers and exhaustion of his troops from rapid and severe marching would have wrested it from Federal grasp. In the spring of 1862 this same Stonewall made a sudden rush upon Banks and drove him from the town and across the Potomac. So greatly did the Federal government appreciate its worth that two armies were dispatched, one under McDowell from Fredericksburg, and the other under Freemont from Franklin, each largely superior to Jackson, to drive him from Winchester. Again the town became headquarters for Federal occupation of the Valley district, and again after Second Manassas was evacuated. On the retirement of Lee's army to Fredericksburg in the fall of 1862, again the town became the Federal headquarters for that section of Virginia. After Chancellorsville, in the order of Lee's combinations, Ewell burst through the gaps of the Blue mountains, and suddenly swooping down upon the
eld of accident. Had Stuart been in touch with Lee, and the Confederate commander furnished with t August testify of Pope's anxiety to retain and Lee's determination to wrest from him this stragetidiers followed his standard. Against this host Lee could oppose but 52,625 ill-fed and poorly-cladnemy. Grant made three desperate assaults on Lee's works; the attack was made in the forenoon. lvern Hill—the strongest position in his line. Lee's forces were 69,762, and in this, as in othersbattle of Cold Harbor conditions were reversed— Lee was behind the defenses, his army about 49,000.pper fords and menaced the Confederate left. Lee's army numbered 57,117. Matters to others thand rear of Lee's depleted army. The genius of Lee seemed to have been inspired, for by some meansral army was sent with the finest army to crush Lee, yet he failed, and Chancellorsville and the Wid Manassas was evacuated. On the retirement of Lee's army to Fredericksburg in the fall of 1862, a[15 more...]<
rd the fords behind him. Just as he struck Hooker's line, he detached Jackson with about 24,000 men, to place himself upon Hooker's right and rear. Silently and swiftly the old foot cavalry of the Stonewall corps traversed the secret by-paths of the wilderness, and late in the afternoon of the 3d of May he stealthily approached the unsuspecting Federals. With a rush and a roar the Stonewall corps broke cover, and with one crash of musketry, then with the bayonet, swept the works. Howard's Eleventh corps was just partaking of its evening meal when the storm swept upon it. Hooker's left wing was thrown into utter rout and rushed in confusion upon the centre. Night alone saved it from destruction. But details are too volumnious. The world knows of Hooker's terrible punishment and defeat. How Lee, with one-third of Hooker's forces, crushed the Federal army and threw it beyond the Rappahannock. Just one year later, on a balmy day in early May, 1864, Grant broke camp at
J. C. S. McDowell (search for this): chapter 1.39
creek, with reserves at Centreville. This was in the early summer of 1861. McDowell was organizing the Grand Army around a splendid nucleus of regulars. This armamor, and all through the four years of carnage this influence was dominant. McDowell moved out of Washington under its orders. Burnside assaulted Lee's line at Frs same power. But pardon this digression, and go back to strategic points. McDowell moved out of Washington with the Grand Army, and developing Beauregard's outpos and precipitated the indecisive battle, 18th of July, 1861. Pausing then, McDowell took advantage of his information to study the situation and plan accordingly. Bee and Bartow died; how Kirby Smith, coming into line almost on the run upon McDowell's flank, and Jackson standing like a stone wall, snatched victory from defeat,ral government appreciate its worth that two armies were dispatched, one under McDowell from Fredericksburg, and the other under Freemont from Franklin, each largely
splendid appointments. Thus, in succession, Manassas, Cold Harbor, and Chancellorsville and the Wilderness, heretofore unknown, became luminous in history, and the terrific battle fought on these fields demonstrated their value as strategic points. Less only in the number of troops engaged, Winchester, in the lower Valley, became conspicuous in Confederate annals as a strategic point. Early in 1861 Johnston recognized its value and so held it. Later Jackson made a vigorous attack on Shields at Kernstown for its recovery, but for paucity of numbers and exhaustion of his troops from rapid and severe marching would have wrested it from Federal grasp. In the spring of 1862 this same Stonewall made a sudden rush upon Banks and drove him from the town and across the Potomac. So greatly did the Federal government appreciate its worth that two armies were dispatched, one under McDowell from Fredericksburg, and the other under Freemont from Franklin, each largely superior to Jackso
G. T. Beauregard (search for this): chapter 1.39
spicuous prominence in American history. But strategic points is the subject of this paper, and it will be best to treat them in the order of their dates. Beauregard's selection of Bull Run as his line defence showed his wisdom as an engineer. His outposts extended from Leesburg, through Drainesville, Fairfax and Wolf Run Station of this same power. But pardon this digression, and go back to strategic points. McDowell moved out of Washington with the Grand Army, and developing Beauregard's outposts, soon pressed them back upon the reserves and precipitated the indecisive battle, 18th of July, 1861. Pausing then, McDowell took advantage of his information to study the situation and plan accordingly. Beauregard, finding his force inadequate, appealed to Johnston, then at Winchester, for assistance. His prompt response is too well known to detail here; how Bee and Bartow died; how Kirby Smith, coming into line almost on the run upon McDowell's flank, and Jackson stan
Kidder Meade (search for this): chapter 1.39
ound a splendid nucleus of regulars. This army was not for the defence of Washington solely, but also for aggressive purposes. There was a supreme authority in the Federal States which became director general, which gave orders to commanders and moved armies. This power was public clamor, and all through the four years of carnage this influence was dominant. McDowell moved out of Washington under its orders. Burnside assaulted Lee's line at Fredericksburg under its arbitrary demand. Meade moved upon the Army of Northern Virginia at Mine Run at the dictation of this same power. But pardon this digression, and go back to strategic points. McDowell moved out of Washington with the Grand Army, and developing Beauregard's outposts, soon pressed them back upon the reserves and precipitated the indecisive battle, 18th of July, 1861. Pausing then, McDowell took advantage of his information to study the situation and plan accordingly. Beauregard, finding his force inadequate
R. S. Ewell (search for this): chapter 1.39
tched, one under McDowell from Fredericksburg, and the other under Freemont from Franklin, each largely superior to Jackson, to drive him from Winchester. Again the town became headquarters for Federal occupation of the Valley district, and again after Second Manassas was evacuated. On the retirement of Lee's army to Fredericksburg in the fall of 1862, again the town became the Federal headquarters for that section of Virginia. After Chancellorsville, in the order of Lee's combinations, Ewell burst through the gaps of the Blue mountains, and suddenly swooping down upon the little city, threw Milroy and the remnant of his garrison across the Potomac. After Gettysburg, Winchester again fell to the Federal occupation. General Jubal Early once again wrested it from the troops of the United States and again forced back, Federal occupation followed, and once more partial success almost put it again in his possession. Thence to the close of the war, it remained in possession of the
J. E. B. Stuart (search for this): chapter 1.39
m some special value, and an analysis of this, deducts the conclusion that these places were Strategic Points. There are several objective points, in the Old Dominion, over whose bosom the pendulum of war oscillated for four cruel years, where the contending armies crashed, that had in them this strategic value, and the fact that battles were fought more than once on these fields proves that the armies did not collide upon them by accident. Gettysburg was a battle-field of accident. Had Stuart been in touch with Lee, and the Confederate commander furnished with the information the cavalry are supposed to acquire, it is now considered more than doubtful that this little Pennsylvania town would have assumed conspicuous prominence in American history. But strategic points is the subject of this paper, and it will be best to treat them in the order of their dates. Beauregard's selection of Bull Run as his line defence showed his wisdom as an engineer. His outposts extended from
erior to Jackson, to drive him from Winchester. Again the town became headquarters for Federal occupation of the Valley district, and again after Second Manassas was evacuated. On the retirement of Lee's army to Fredericksburg in the fall of 1862, again the town became the Federal headquarters for that section of Virginia. After Chancellorsville, in the order of Lee's combinations, Ewell burst through the gaps of the Blue mountains, and suddenly swooping down upon the little city, threw Milroy and the remnant of his garrison across the Potomac. After Gettysburg, Winchester again fell to the Federal occupation. General Jubal Early once again wrested it from the troops of the United States and again forced back, Federal occupation followed, and once more partial success almost put it again in his possession. Thence to the close of the war, it remained in possession of the Federal troops. No other place of similar importance so often changed hands as did the little city of Win
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