hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in descending order. Sort in ascending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Ulysses S. Grant 368 0 Browse Search
Fitz Lee 306 2 Browse Search
D. H. Hill 305 15 Browse Search
Stonewall Jackson 215 1 Browse Search
Robert E. Lee 150 0 Browse Search
Custis Lee 138 2 Browse Search
John B. Gordon 135 3 Browse Search
United States (United States) 122 0 Browse Search
James Longstreet 120 2 Browse Search
R. E. Lee 112 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

Found 187 total hits in 54 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6
Bull Run, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.39
ot collide upon them by accident. Gettysburg was a battle-field of accident. Had Stuart been in touch with Lee, and the Confederate commander furnished with the information the cavalry are supposed to acquire, it is now considered more than doubtful that this little Pennsylvania town would have assumed conspicuous prominence in American history. But strategic points is the subject of this paper, and it will be best to treat them in the order of their dates. Beauregard's selection of Bull Run as his line defence showed his wisdom as an engineer. His outposts extended from Leesburg, through Drainesville, Fairfax and Wolf Run Shoals, to Acquia creek, with reserves at Centreville. This was in the early summer of 1861. McDowell was organizing the Grand Army around a splendid nucleus of regulars. This army was not for the defence of Washington solely, but also for aggressive purposes. There was a supreme authority in the Federal States which became director general, which ga
Centreville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.39
re supposed to acquire, it is now considered more than doubtful that this little Pennsylvania town would have assumed conspicuous prominence in American history. But strategic points is the subject of this paper, and it will be best to treat them in the order of their dates. Beauregard's selection of Bull Run as his line defence showed his wisdom as an engineer. His outposts extended from Leesburg, through Drainesville, Fairfax and Wolf Run Shoals, to Acquia creek, with reserves at Centreville. This was in the early summer of 1861. McDowell was organizing the Grand Army around a splendid nucleus of regulars. This army was not for the defence of Washington solely, but also for aggressive purposes. There was a supreme authority in the Federal States which became director general, which gave orders to commanders and moved armies. This power was public clamor, and all through the four years of carnage this influence was dominant. McDowell moved out of Washington under it
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.39
he pendulum of war oscillated for four cruel years, where the contending armies crashed, that had in them this strategic value, and the fact that battles were fought more than once on these fields proves that the armies did not collide upon them by accident. Gettysburg was a battle-field of accident. Had Stuart been in touch with Lee, and the Confederate commander furnished with the information the cavalry are supposed to acquire, it is now considered more than doubtful that this little Pennsylvania town would have assumed conspicuous prominence in American history. But strategic points is the subject of this paper, and it will be best to treat them in the order of their dates. Beauregard's selection of Bull Run as his line defence showed his wisdom as an engineer. His outposts extended from Leesburg, through Drainesville, Fairfax and Wolf Run Shoals, to Acquia creek, with reserves at Centreville. This was in the early summer of 1861. McDowell was organizing the Grand Army
Aquia Creek (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.39
h the information the cavalry are supposed to acquire, it is now considered more than doubtful that this little Pennsylvania town would have assumed conspicuous prominence in American history. But strategic points is the subject of this paper, and it will be best to treat them in the order of their dates. Beauregard's selection of Bull Run as his line defence showed his wisdom as an engineer. His outposts extended from Leesburg, through Drainesville, Fairfax and Wolf Run Shoals, to Acquia creek, with reserves at Centreville. This was in the early summer of 1861. McDowell was organizing the Grand Army around a splendid nucleus of regulars. This army was not for the defence of Washington solely, but also for aggressive purposes. There was a supreme authority in the Federal States which became director general, which gave orders to commanders and moved armies. This power was public clamor, and all through the four years of carnage this influence was dominant. McDowell mo
White Oak Swamp (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.39
ed like water, but as long as this point held out, McClellan maintained his right in tact. Jackson sent imperative order to storm the works, and though fourteen heavy field guns and three lines of battles hurled shot, shell and bullets upon them, the gallant Hood with his splendid Texans finally carried the fort by storm, and doubled McClellan's right back upon his centre. Successively, Mechanicsville, Ellerson's Mills, Cold Harbor, Gaines' Mill, Frazer's Farm, Savage Station, and White Oak Swamp were torn from McClellan's group, and these names blazoned in martial glory upon the star crossed flag, while McClellan's beaten army sought protection under the guns of the Federal fleet in James river. A lapse of two years brings us back to historic Cold Harbor. The war had now progressed more than three years. Other commanders had failed and public clamor was demanding better results for the money and blood so liberally and lavishly spent in the Old Dominion. Grant was summon
Gaines Mill (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.39
ndid works, resisted fiercely. Southern blood flowed like water, but as long as this point held out, McClellan maintained his right in tact. Jackson sent imperative order to storm the works, and though fourteen heavy field guns and three lines of battles hurled shot, shell and bullets upon them, the gallant Hood with his splendid Texans finally carried the fort by storm, and doubled McClellan's right back upon his centre. Successively, Mechanicsville, Ellerson's Mills, Cold Harbor, Gaines' Mill, Frazer's Farm, Savage Station, and White Oak Swamp were torn from McClellan's group, and these names blazoned in martial glory upon the star crossed flag, while McClellan's beaten army sought protection under the guns of the Federal fleet in James river. A lapse of two years brings us back to historic Cold Harbor. The war had now progressed more than three years. Other commanders had failed and public clamor was demanding better results for the money and blood so liberally and lavis
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.39
es hurled shot, shell and bullets upon them, the gallant Hood with his splendid Texans finally carried the fort by storm, and doubled McClellan's right back upon his centre. Successively, Mechanicsville, Ellerson's Mills, Cold Harbor, Gaines' Mill, Frazer's Farm, Savage Station, and White Oak Swamp were torn from McClellan's group, and these names blazoned in martial glory upon the star crossed flag, while McClellan's beaten army sought protection under the guns of the Federal fleet in James river. A lapse of two years brings us back to historic Cold Harbor. The war had now progressed more than three years. Other commanders had failed and public clamor was demanding better results for the money and blood so liberally and lavishly spent in the Old Dominion. Grant was summoned from his successes in the West, and the government assigned him this terrible task. Unlimited resources were placed at his disposal; when he broke camp early in May, 1864, 141, 160 splendidly equipped
Suffolk, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.39
ring assaults history records. In the second battle of Cold Harbor conditions were reversed— Lee was behind the defenses, his army about 49,000. Grant was to attack with 140,000 men. He hurled his immense weight upon Lee, but with no effect, except to destroy his men. This leads up to the inquiry, Was either the better soldier? The spring of 1863 found Lee's army at Fredericksburg watching his powerful antagonist across the Rappahannock. Longstreet had been detached for service near Suffolk, and the Army of Northern Virginia thus weakened. Hooker had succeeded Burnside in command of the Army of the Potomac. New hopes inspired the Federal army. Hooker was jubilant; he announced to the world the finest army on the planet was about to exterminate its enemies. So sure was he of this, he dispatched to General Hallock at Washington: The rebel army is now the legitimate property of the Army of the Potomac. Rejecting Burnside's plan of direct assault, he divided his army o
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 1.39
t of Lee's army to Fredericksburg in the fall of 1862, again the town became the Federal headquarters for that section of Virginia. After Chancellorsville, in the order of Lee's combinations, Ewell burst through the gaps of the Blue mountains, and suddenly swooping down upon the little city, threw Milroy and the remnant of his garrison across the Potomac. After Gettysburg, Winchester again fell to the Federal occupation. General Jubal Early once again wrested it from the troops of the United States and again forced back, Federal occupation followed, and once more partial success almost put it again in his possession. Thence to the close of the war, it remained in possession of the Federal troops. No other place of similar importance so often changed hands as did the little city of Winchester; and while not contended for by so large forces as the other points mentioned, yet the frequency with which its occupation was fought for, testifies its value in the estimation, both of th
Spottsylvania (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.39
e's line, the night of the third day's fight the Federal commander silently moved his army by the left flank, trusting with the morning sun to envelope the right and rear of Lee's depleted army. The genius of Lee seemed to have been inspired, for by some means he divined his adversary's plans and moved parallel to him, and as Grant changed from flank to front and moved forward, the battered but defiant Army of Northern Virginia was before him. Thence followed the fierce battles around Spotsylvania, North Anna and Cold Harbor. So ended the terrible Battle of the Wilderness. On nearly the same ground Lee and Hooker had fought two years before, and now the first captain in the Federal army was sent with the finest army to crush Lee, yet he failed, and Chancellorsville and the Wilderness became famous in history as stragetic spots. Here in each battle genius and unsurpassed courage more than matched numbers and splendid appointments. Thus, in succession, Manassas, Cold Harbor,
1 2 3 4 5 6