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nge that the earliest ambition of D. H. Hill led him to seek for a place at West Point and to look forward to a military career. Under the rigid physical examination now prescribed for an applicant, he would have been rejected without hesitation. He entered the institution in 1838, and but for feeble health, would have pressed to the very front of a class of which Generals Longstreet, A. P. Stewart, G. W. Smith, R. H. Anderson and Van Dorn of the Confederate, and Rosecranz, Pope, Sikes, Doubleday, Stone and Reynolds of the Federal army were members. Mexican war. Graduating in 1842, he was still a second lieutenant when he was ordered with his command into active service in Mexico in August, 1845. During the three succeeding years he participated in nearly every battle fought by our forces under the command of either Scott or Taylor, and always attracted the notice of his superior officers by his conspicuous courage. He soon rose to the rank of first lieutenant, and for gall
A. P. Stewart (search for this): chapter 1.7
thout hesitation. He entered the institution in 1838, and but for feeble health, would have pressed to the very front of a class of which Generals Longstreet, A. P. Stewart, G. W. Smith, R. H. Anderson and Van Dorn of the Confederate, and Rosecranz, Pope, Sikes, Doubleday, Stone and Reynolds of the Federal army were members. Mom Bragg the warm welcome of a comrade who had seen his metal tried on the hard-fought fields of Mexico. Not less cordial was the greeting of his old class-mate, A. P. Stewart, and of the plucky Pat. Cleburne, who seemed from the first to feel that he had found a soldier-affinity in the congenial spirit of Hill. When at last theohn C. Breckinridge, at his own request was allowed to take the extreme right, flanked by Forrest and supported in this forward movement by Cleburne on the left. Stewart, having been transferred to Buckner, these two divisions constituted Hill's corps. In rear of the line from which Breckinridge and Cleburne moved to the attack,
Patrick Cleburne (search for this): chapter 1.7
est and supported in this forward movement by Cleburne on the left. Stewart, having been transferre rear of the line from which Breckinridge and Cleburne moved to the attack, at nine in the morning, kinridge had encountered an earthwork, as had Cleburne's whole line, and their western foe standing apture, and slowly and stubbornly both he and Cleburne fell back and reformed, but much nearer to ther drew, and Polk, Longstreet, Hill, Buckner, Cleburne, Cheatham, Brown and other Generals signed aner was left there to be signed. Cheatham and Cleburne met at that point and put their names to the stance of a conversation between Cheatham and Cleburne as they joined in a social glass after signinatham. Let me tell you an old fable, replied Cleburne. The report had been circulated among the berust as commander of a corps: headquarters Cleburne's division, mission Ridge, October 9, 1863. iminished the love, respect and confidence of Cleburne's division. Respectfully your friend, P. R[3 more...]
o beg that three lines be formed and a general advance ordered on the right as well as on the left. Just before night General Polk permitted Hill to take charge of the forward movement of the three lines, Walker in front, his own corps composing theesertion of men whose homes were exposed to devastation by the Federals. It was at this juncture that Buckner drew, and Polk, Longstreet, Hill, Buckner, Cleburne, Cheatham, Brown and other Generals signed and sent to the President a petition statilone, know how fully to appreciate this. Your friend and obedient servant, [Signed] H. D. Clayton. headquarters Polk's Brigade, October 16, 1863. General,—In behalf of myself and brigade, allow me to express to you our high appreciationou for the display of that generalship that led us to victory at Chickamauga. Respectfully your friend, [Signed] L. E. Polk, Brigadier-General. headquarters Lowry's Brigade, mission Ridge, October 16, 1863. Dear General,—Paragraph 2, Sp
A. H. Colquitt (search for this): chapter 1.7
before the world as one of the best and bravest of all our leaders. It was this same gift that enabled General Hill to select from the lieutenants of his regiment Robert F. Hoke to be made major of his regiment over ten competent captains. It was this intuitive perception of persistent pluck, dash and coolness that prompted him to love and honor George B. Anderson, William R. Cox, Bryan Grimes, Stephen D. Ramseur and Robert D. Johnston, and led him later to urge the advancement of Gordon, Colquitt and Doles, of Georgia. In June, 1861 (a few days after the fight at Bethel), in a letter to his wife he said of Stonewall Jackson, then a colonel in command of a brigade, I see that Jackson has had an engagement and taken many prisoners. I have predicted all along that Colonel Jackson would have a prominent place in the war. Battle of Bethel. On the 6th of June, 1861, Colonel Hill, then at Yorktown, was ordered to make a reconnoissance in force in the direction of Fortress Monroe, a
Arthur P. Hayne (search for this): chapter 1.7
whom they came in contact. His paternal grandfather, William Hill a native of Ireland, had landed in Pennsylvania, and moving South with the stream of Scotch-Irish that populated the valley of Virginia and Western North Carolina, built, with Colonel Hayne as his partner, in 1770, an iron foundry in York District, which within the next decade was the only point south of Virginia where cannons were cast for the use of the colonial armies. He was colonel of a regiment in Sumpter's brigade, and f a native Scotchman, who was Sumpter's trusted scout and the bravest man in his command, as the General himself often declared. Two uncles of General Hill were soldiers in the second war with England, and one of them was the adjutant of Colonel Arthur P. Hayne's regiment. Solomon Hill, his father, died when his son Harvey was but four years old, leaving him with four other children to bereared by a mother who was noted for her piety, culture, common sense and devotion to her children. Like a
make his position untenable, then Hill's charge was indeed decisive of the struggle at Gaines' Mill. Crossing the Chickahominy on the night of the 29th in the advance of Jackson's corps, D. H. Hill passed Savage Station where he took 1,000 prisoners, exclusive of 3,000 in and connected with the Federal hospital. The progress of Jackson was arrested by obstructions and the stubborn resistance at White Oak swamps, and he failed to effect a junction with Longstreet till after the fight at Frasier's farm. Malvern Hill. D. H. Hill was again the first to reach and occupy the position which he was ordered to assume preparatory to a general advance on Malvern Hill. The other parts of the line were not formed till a much later hour in the day. General Lee says in his report of the battle (Series 1, Volume XI, Part 2, page 496 of Official Records): Orders were issued for a general advance at a given signal, but the causes referred to prevented a proper concert of action among the
Robert F. Hoke (search for this): chapter 1.7
at splendid body of volunteers, that ultimately placed them at the head of companies, regiments, brigades and divisions. Among its originial officers were Major-General Hoke, Brigadier-Generals Lane and Lewis, Colonels Avery, Bridgers, Hardy, W. W. McDowell, J. C. S. McDowell, Starr, Pemberton, Fuller, and a score of others, whie the world as one of the best and bravest of all our leaders. It was this same gift that enabled General Hill to select from the lieutenants of his regiment Robert F. Hoke to be made major of his regiment over ten competent captains. It was this intuitive perception of persistent pluck, dash and coolness that prompted him to loring scenes of the last days of the Confederacy, Hill was not a man to sulk in his tent. Volunteering successively on the staff of his old friends, Beauregard and Hoke, who appreciated his advice and assistance, he showed himself ever ready to serve the cause in any capacity. The repeated and urgent requests of both Johnston a
in which two men were killed and eight wounded. The Zouaves, instead of following immediately upon the heels of the fugitive rebels, as contemplated by Butler, turned back, and fled precipitately on hearing the firing in front of their own reserve line. On the next day they again moved forward and attacked the force at Big Bethel, Colonel McGruder having meantime arrived with Cary's battalion of infantry. The whole force engaged on the Confederate side was 800 North Carolinians and 400 Virginians; on the Federal, 3,500, with 1,500 to 2,500 in reserve. After preliminary skirmishing for about two hours, and an attack that lasted two and a half hours longer, the enemy retreated in great confusion, with a loss of probably 50 killed and 300 wounded, and were so hotly pursued by our cavalry that they scattered guns, haversacks and knapsacks till they crossed a bridge and stopped the pursuit by destroying it. The names of no soldiers of North Carolina should be inscribed in a more promin
C. S. Winder (search for this): chapter 1.7
comforted Reynolds, who was mortified at being caught asleep, by reminding him that his gallant conduct in Mexico and on the border would protect his good name from a shade of suspicion. Both were placed in an ambulance, paroled to report to General Winder at Richmond, and furnished with the address of a friend of General Hill's who would honor their drafts for money. These incidents are reproduced because they bring to view traits of General Hill's character of which the world generally knows when at dark—under the pressure of our batteries, which had then begun to play with marked effect upon the left, of other concurring events of the field and of the bold and dashing charge of General Hill's infantry, in which the troops of General C. S. Winder joined—the enemy yielded the field and fled in confusion. Of the part taken by Hill, General Lee said in his report (Series 1, Volume XI, Part 2, page 493, Official Records): D. H. Hill charged across the open ground in his front, one of
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