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he old army were voluntarily sent to the Chief Executive, naming D. H. Hill as among the bravest soldiers in the army of the United States. Among the few of these testimonials still extant is the letter from the gallant Bee, who, in exclaiming a moment before he fell at Manassas, There stands Jackson like a stonewall, gave to the great leader the pet name by which his soldiers called him and the world knows him, and thereby made himself immortal as its author. The letter, addressed to General Dunavant on the 26th of October, 1856, is as follows: It gives me great pleasure to add my mite of praise to that which has already been given to Mr. Hill by his military superiors. I had the pleasure of knowing him intimately and serving with him in the storming party detailed from Twigg's division for the attack on Chepultepec. I can bear full testimony to his gallantry and to his ardent desire to do his duty well. In addition, I can testify to his State pride, evinced in his going up
d. The popular impression that the bridges across the Chickahominy had already been swept away when the fight at Seven Pines began on the 30th of May, 1861, is totally unfounded. The corps of Heintzelman and Keyes were then south, and that of Sumner north of the Chickahominy. The plan outlined by General Johnston was, briefly, that Huger should move from his camp, near Richmond, early on that morning down the Charles City road and vigorously attack the enemy's right, and Longstreet and Hill moving on the same road should attack the center and left of the force south of the bridge, while G. W. Smith's corps should advance on the Nine Mile road, and turn the left of Heintzelman and Keyes if Sumner should not have arrived, or engage and prevent the junction of his with the other corps, if he should cross. Longstreet and Hill were in position to attack at an early hour, but waited till ten o'clock for the arrival of Huger, whose division, except two regiments of Rodes (which created
George B. McClellan (search for this): chapter 1.7
e annals of warfare. Seven Pines. When McClellan moved his army over Bottom's bridge, threw aconcurred with Mr. Davis in the opinion that McClellan should be attacked on the other side of the ground that, after waiting a week and giving McClellan the opportunity to fortify, operations shouler express his delight at the discovery that McClellan's whole army was approaching his front. (2 Bection of its contents, that on the day when McClellan attacked Hill, at South Mountain, he had reaare not left to conjecture on that subject. McClellan wrote General Franklin from Frederick City o1, Volume XIX, Series 1 of Official Records, McClellan says: The following is a copy of the order rs 1, Volume XIX, Part 1, page 145.) This was McClellan's own idea of Lee's design, and if he could , therefore, and it is equally manifest that McClellan had every reason for inserting a full copy iee's book and the supposed copy delivered to McClellan, there is nothing to contradict the testimon[15 more...]
Leonidas Polk (search for this): chapter 1.7
n his metal tried on the hard-fought fields of Mexico. Not less cordial was the greeting of his old class-mate, A. P. Stewart, and of the plucky Pat. Cleburne, who seemed from the first to feel that he had found a soldier-affinity in the congenial spirit of Hill. When at last the scattered hosts had concentrated and confronted each other on the Chickamauga, it was not till after the night of the first day that Bragg made public his purpose to give the entire management of the right wing to Polk and the control of the left to Longstreet. If the enemy's left under the stalwart Thomas could be driven from the Lafayette road, the communication with Chattanooga would be cut off and the retreat and ruin of the enemy inevitable. To accomplish this end Bragg seemed more intent on hurried, than concentrated effort. That grand man, officer and statesman, John C. Breckinridge, at his own request was allowed to take the extreme right, flanked by Forrest and supported in this forward movement
Stephen D. Ramseur (search for this): chapter 1.7
ment Robert F. Hoke to be made major of his regiment over ten competent captains. It was this intuitive perception of persistent pluck, dash and coolness that prompted him to love and honor George B. Anderson, William R. Cox, Bryan Grimes, Stephen D. Ramseur and Robert D. Johnston, and led him later to urge the advancement of Gordon, Colquitt and Doles, of Georgia. In June, 1861 (a few days after the fight at Bethel), in a letter to his wife he said of Stonewall Jackson, then a colonel in commthe first division of Johnston's army to enter Yorktown and the last to leave it and pass with his command through the reserve line. When the vanguard of the enemy, led by Hancock, rushed upon our rear at Williamsburg, it was Basil C. Manly, of Ramseur's Battery, who, seeing that a section of the enemy's light artillery might beat him in the race to occupy an earthwork midway between the two, unlimbered on the way and by a well directed shot disabled the enemy in transitu, and quick as thought
ade, standing boldly in line without a cartridge. At this critical moment, when the enemy was advancing on Cooke, says General Longstreet, A shot came across the Federal front plowing the ground in a parallel line, then another and another, each nearer and nearer their line. This enfilade fire was from a battery on D. H. Hill's line, and it soon beat back the attacking column. (2 Battles and Leaders of the Civil War, page 670.) On the right General Lee was stationed in person, and with Toombs' brigade (says General Longstreet) held the enemy in check till A. P. Hill's division rushed to the rescue with Pender on the right and Branch on the left of his line, and aided by well-directed shots from a battery planted by D. H. Hill on his front, drove them back in confusion. (2 Battles and Leaders of the Civil War, page 670.) Generals Lee, Longstreet, and D. H. Hill concluded during a short suspension of musketry fire to reconnoiter the position of the enemy from the crest of a ridge i
Gray Thomas (search for this): chapter 1.7
in Hill's rear when the impetuous charge of Breckinridge's two right brigades broke the left of Thomas and crossed the fateful road. With 2,000 infantry and a battery of artillery Breckinridge swunghowever, in a way entirely unexpected, when it led the enemy to mass so much of his force behind Thomas. This was the occupation of the enemy while Hill and Forrest were riding up and down in front ouous, and with a momentary wavering of a brigade on the right, we rushed over the breastworks of Thomas and caught 5,000 prisoners in the angle, where Longstreet and Hill met, as they had on many hardy failed to secure for Forrest the infantry support that would have swept the single division of Thomas out of the gap on Missionary Ridge, or flanked and captured it, without another obstruction in tnooga impregnable, and then uniting the forces of Grant and Sherman with the reorganized army of Thomas to overwhelm them, were the disheartened Confederates, daily growing weaker from the desertion o
Duncan K. McRae (search for this): chapter 1.7
pass with his command through the reserve line. When the vanguard of the enemy, led by Hancock, rushed upon our rear at Williamsburg, it was Basil C. Manly, of Ramseur's Battery, who, seeing that a section of the enemy's light artillery might beat him in the race to occupy an earthwork midway between the two, unlimbered on the way and by a well directed shot disabled the enemy in transitu, and quick as thought limbered up again, and ran into the fortifications. It was the regiment of Duncan K. McRae, of D. H. Hill's division, that extorted from the generous and gallant Hancock that memorable declaration, The Fifth North Carolina and Twenty-fourth Virginia deserve to have the word immortal inscribed on their banners. It was this charge which Early describes as an attack upon the vastly superior forces of the enemy, which, for its gallantry, is unsurpassed in the annals of warfare. Seven Pines. When McClellan moved his army over Bottom's bridge, threw a heavy column across th
J. Longstreet (search for this): chapter 1.7
at Bragg made public his purpose to give the entire management of the right wing to Polk and the control of the left to Longstreet. If the enemy's left under the stalwart Thomas could be driven from the Lafayette road, the communication with Chattanring of a brigade on the right, we rushed over the breastworks of Thomas and caught 5,000 prisoners in the angle, where Longstreet and Hill met, as they had on many hard-fought fields before, to discuss the events of that day and prepare, as they hadn some hours had been passed in the vain effort to learn where the headquarters of the commanding general were located, Longstreet and Hill agreed to divide the responsibility of ordering the immediate pursuit by Forrest, with an assurance that they of men whose homes were exposed to devastation by the Federals. It was at this juncture that Buckner drew, and Polk, Longstreet, Hill, Buckner, Cleburne, Cheatham, Brown and other Generals signed and sent to the President a petition stating that t
Braxton Bragg (search for this): chapter 1.7
s enemies be scattered. Hill received from Bragg the warm welcome of a comrade who had seen hisnot till after the night of the first day that Bragg made public his purpose to give the entire man the enemy inevitable. To accomplish this end Bragg seemed more intent on hurried, than concentrat same time. After the battle of Murfreesboro, Bragg had addressed letters to the chiefs of divisioe correspondence led to an open breach between Bragg and Breckinridge and a newspaper controversy,ed. Hill cherished no unkind feeling toward Bragg, and at the time reluctantly reached the conclion of the officers and men of the army, which Bragg left after the next fight, never to rejoin tilrom which it will appear that the influence of Bragg, who was at the elbow of the President as his ion, or the principal promoter of the plan for Bragg's removal, and that it dawned upon the great chieftain that the retention of Bragg was the one mistake of his own marvellous administration of th[7 more...]
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