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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones).

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January 10th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 1.2
R. Garland, commanding 1st Brigade, Army of Lower Arkansas and White River. The following, in the handwriting of the gallant Colonel Garland, has been kindly furnished by his son, Mr. Walter Garland, Baltimore, Maryland. Colonel Garland was a member of the well-known Virginia family of the name: Camp Chase, Ohio, April I, 1863. Captain. I have the honor to submit the following report of the First Brigade, Army of Lower Arkansas and White River, in the action at Arkansas Post, on the 10th and 11th of January, 1863: The brigade was composed of the 6th Texas infantry, Lieutenant-Colonel Anderson, commanding, commanders 27, enlisted 515, aggregate 542; 24th Texas Cavalry (dismounted), Colonel Wilks, commanders 41, enlisted 546, aggregate 587; Arkansas Light Battery (6 guns), Captain Hart, commanders 4, enlisted 79, aggregate 83; Missouri Cavalry, Captain Denson, commanders 2, enlisted 31, aggregate 33. Total present, Friday evening, January 9th, 1863: commanders 107, enlisted
January 11th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 1.2
Arkansas Post. Zzzits fall, January 11, 1863. Report of Colonel R. R. Garland, commanding 1st Brigade, Army of Lower Arkansas and White River. The following, in the handwriting of the gallant Colonel Garland, has been kindly furnished by his son, Mr. Walter Garland, Baltimore, Maryland. Colonel Garland was a member of the well-known Virginia family of the name: Camp Chase, Ohio, April I, 1863. Captain. I have the honor to submit the following report of the First Brigade, Army of Lower Arkansas and White River, in the action at Arkansas Post, on the 10th and 11th of January, 1863: The brigade was composed of the 6th Texas infantry, Lieutenant-Colonel Anderson, commanding, commanders 27, enlisted 515, aggregate 542; 24th Texas Cavalry (dismounted), Colonel Wilks, commanders 41, enlisted 546, aggregate 587; Arkansas Light Battery (6 guns), Captain Hart, commanders 4, enlisted 79, aggregate 83; Missouri Cavalry, Captain Denson, commanders 2, enlisted 31, aggregate 3
January 9th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 1.2
action at Arkansas Post, on the 10th and 11th of January, 1863: The brigade was composed of the 6th Texas infantry, Lieutenant-Colonel Anderson, commanding, commanders 27, enlisted 515, aggregate 542; 24th Texas Cavalry (dismounted), Colonel Wilks, commanders 41, enlisted 546, aggregate 587; Arkansas Light Battery (6 guns), Captain Hart, commanders 4, enlisted 79, aggregate 83; Missouri Cavalry, Captain Denson, commanders 2, enlisted 31, aggregate 33. Total present, Friday evening, January 9th, 1863: commanders 107, enlisted 1,690, aggregate 1,797. Late in the afternoon of Friday, the 9th, I received orders to proceed with my command to the rifle pits, a mile and a quarter below the fort. On arriving there a little after dark, the following disposition was made of the brigade, viz: Five companies of infantry, under command of Lieutenant-Colonel Swearengen, 24th Texas (dismounted) Cavalry, and Major Phillips' 6th Texas Infantry, were ordered to take position several hundred yar
rriving at the fort (agreeable to instructions) the brigade took position to the left of the 19th Arkansas Regiment, of Dunnington's brigade. Hart's Battery on the right, the 6th Texas Infantry, 24th and 25th Texas Cavalry (dismounted), in successiorfectly constructed, afforded but slight protection. Sunday, the 11th, about sunrise, the 19th Arkansas Regiment, of Dunnington's Brigade, with four pieces from Hart's Battery, were ordered from my right to the extreme left of our line, to cover teviously received instructions from the brigadier-general commanding to furnish reinforcements to Colonels Deshler and Dunnington (commanders of brigades) when called upon, and the enemy, up to this time, having made no serious demonstration of an int attempts, in quick succession, to carry our line, but were as often promptly repulsed. About 4 o'clock P. M., Colonel Dunnington, commanding the fort, called on me for reinforcements, and although half of my command was already detached and I w
John Churchill (search for this): chapter 1.2
wo iron-clad gunboats passed the fort, delivering their fire immediately opposite and very near to the fort, completely silencing it, as well as the two guns on this part of the line. The enemy's gunboats and batteries had now complete command of our position, taking it on the right flank, front and rear, literally raking the entire position. It was at this particular crisis, about 4.30 o'clock P. M., that my attention was attracted by the cry of Raise the while flag, by order of General Churchill; pass the order up the line, and on looking to the left, to my great astonishment, I saw a number of small white flags displayed in Wilks' Regiment, 24th Texas Cavalry (dismounted), from the right company so far as I could see toward the left. As I could not believe it possible that a white flag could be thus treacherously displayed in any part our lines with impunity, I was deceived, and by this sudden and simultaneous display of white flags, as well as by the cessation of all firing
R. R. Garland (search for this): chapter 1.2
Arkansas Post. Zzzits fall, January 11, 1863. Report of Colonel R. R. Garland, commanding 1st Brigade, Army of Lower Arkansas and White River. The following, in the handwriting of the gallant Colonel Garland, has been kindly furnished by his son, Mr. Walter Garland, Baltimore, Maryland. Colonel Garland was a member ofColonel Garland, has been kindly furnished by his son, Mr. Walter Garland, Baltimore, Maryland. Colonel Garland was a member of the well-known Virginia family of the name: Camp Chase, Ohio, April I, 1863. Captain. I have the honor to submit the following report of the First Brigade, Army of Lower Arkansas and White River, in the action at Arkansas Post, on the 10th and 11th of January, 1863: The brigade was composed of the 6th Texas infantry, Lieureacherously deceived the command, it was raised in Wilks' 24th Regiment of Texas Cavalry (dismounted), and the interest of the service, as well as justice, demands a thorough investigation at the earliest date practicable. R. R. Garland, Colonel 6th Texas Infantry, Commanding 1st Brigade, Army of Lower Arkansas and While River.
James E. Phillips (search for this): chapter 1.2
ing disposition was made of the brigade, viz: Five companies of infantry, under command of Lieutenant-Colonel Swearengen, 24th Texas (dismounted) Cavalry, and Major Phillips' 6th Texas Infantry, were ordered to take position several hundred yards in front of the rifle pits, deployed as skirmishers. Hart's Battery on the right of e companies of the 24th and 25th Texas Cavalry (dismounted), with two companies of the 6th Texas Infantry, under Lieutenant-Colonel Swearengen and Neiland and Major Phillips, respectively, to repair to the left, and report to Colonel Deshler (commanding the 2d Brigade). Whilst this movement was being executed, and the remainder ofle coolness and courage throughout the engagement. Much credit is due Lieutenant-Colonels Swearengen, of the 24th Texas Cavalry, and Nieland of the 25th, and Major Phillips, of the 6th Texas Regiment, for the prompt and gallant manner in which they led the reinforcements from their respective regiments, ordered from the right to
Walter Garland (search for this): chapter 1.2
Zzzits fall, January 11, 1863. Report of Colonel R. R. Garland, commanding 1st Brigade, Army of Lower Arkansas and White River. The following, in the handwriting of the gallant Colonel Garland, has been kindly furnished by his son, Mr. Walter Garland, Baltimore, Maryland. Colonel Garland was a member of the well-known Virginia family of the name: Camp Chase, Ohio, April I, 1863. Captain. I have the honor to submit the following report of the First Brigade, Army of Lower Arkansas aColonel Garland was a member of the well-known Virginia family of the name: Camp Chase, Ohio, April I, 1863. Captain. I have the honor to submit the following report of the First Brigade, Army of Lower Arkansas and White River, in the action at Arkansas Post, on the 10th and 11th of January, 1863: The brigade was composed of the 6th Texas infantry, Lieutenant-Colonel Anderson, commanding, commanders 27, enlisted 515, aggregate 542; 24th Texas Cavalry (dismounted), Colonel Wilks, commanders 41, enlisted 546, aggregate 587; Arkansas Light Battery (6 guns), Captain Hart, commanders 4, enlisted 79, aggregate 83; Missouri Cavalry, Captain Denson, commanders 2, enlisted 31, aggregate 33. Total present, F
Lieutenant-Colonel Anderson, commanding, commanders 27, enlisted 515, aggregate 542; 24th Texas Cavalry (dismounted), Colonel Wilks, commanders 41, enlisted 546, aggregate 587; Arkansas Light Battery (6 guns), Captain Hart, commanders 4, enlisted 79order up the line, and on looking to the left, to my great astonishment, I saw a number of small white flags displayed in Wilks' Regiment, 24th Texas Cavalry (dismounted), from the right company so far as I could see toward the left. As I could notd the enemy had taken advantage of it before it came to my knowledge. As no white flags were displayed from the right of Wilks' Regiment to the fort, the enemy's batteries kept up their fire on this part of the line for some minutes after all firindence that I can obtain on the subject of the white flag, which thus treacherously deceived the command, it was raised in Wilks' 24th Regiment of Texas Cavalry (dismounted), and the interest of the service, as well as justice, demands a thorough inv
the fort. On arriving there a little after dark, the following disposition was made of the brigade, viz: Five companies of infantry, under command of Lieutenant-Colonel Swearengen, 24th Texas (dismounted) Cavalry, and Major Phillips' 6th Texas Infantry, were ordered to take position several hundred yards in front of the rifle pitart of the line, I ordered the alternate companies of the 24th and 25th Texas Cavalry (dismounted), with two companies of the 6th Texas Infantry, under Lieutenant-Colonel Swearengen and Neiland and Major Phillips, respectively, to repair to the left, and report to Colonel Deshler (commanding the 2d Brigade). Whilst this movement wahe officers and men of the command (with but few exceptions) exhibited commendable coolness and courage throughout the engagement. Much credit is due Lieutenant-Colonels Swearengen, of the 24th Texas Cavalry, and Nieland of the 25th, and Major Phillips, of the 6th Texas Regiment, for the prompt and gallant manner in which they le
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