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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Percy Gregg (search for this): chapter 1.17
tial of a war vessel is that its engines and boilers should be below the water line, for protection against the damage of shot or shell. In your gunboats, boilers and engines were on deck, and at all times exposed to the ravage and complete destruction of a single shot. In this fashion you equipped yourselves, and girded your loins to grapple with a naval power, armed with the accumulations and experence of sixty years, supplemented with additions from a wide field and vast resources. Gregg, in his history of the war, says that on land you were outnumbered at times from two to ten for one; but in the navy from 100 to 1,000 to one. We make no computation of the ratio, but rest solely upon the abiding sense that you and we will always feel, of a great disproportion. With green timber, after plans devised to meet the lack of skill in your labor, for you had no force of ship carpenters, you built ironclads at Norfolk, Richmond, Wilmington, Charleston, Savannah, Mobile, New Orle
John Taylor Wood (search for this): chapter 1.17
of the United States Revenue vessel Cushing. His subsequent dash, April 23, 1865, in the river steamer Webb, through the Federal fleet at the mouth of the Red River; running the gauntlet of the Federal fleet at New Orleans the day after. John Taylor Wood, in his many daring captures by boarding, culminating in the boarding and capture of the United States gunboat Underwriter, in the Neuse River, within pistol shot of two of the enemy's forts, the night of February 1, 1864. The heroism of bama, Maffit in the Florida, with a bare handful of men, stricken with yellow fever, running the blockade of Mobile in the broad daylight, there refitting and passing again through the Federal fleet. Pegram in the Nashville, Maury in the Georgia, Wood in the Tallahassee, Wilkinson in the Chicamauga, Waddell in the Shenandoah, Read in the sailing ships Clarence, Tacony, and Archer, denied all rights in foreign ports, save those of belligerents, swept the seas bare of American commerce, and infli
overnment from February, 1861, to August, 1862—eighteen months—were $302,500,000, its expenditures, $347,300,000, and of this vast sum, but fourteen and a half millions were appropriated to the building and equipment of a navy. You had officers sufficient, many of them already of national fame, of large experience and great abilities, but no ships, no seamen. Can you create an army without men and without muskets? The task of the Israelites in Egypt pales in the contrast; the labors of Sisyphus were not more hopeless. What could these men do? What did they do? Taking as their guide the wisdom of Scripture, Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with thy might, they sought service in all available lines, and did a noble work, though history has failed to embalm in living record a tribute to their labors. Their reward has been found, not in the recognition of a grateful country, but in the conscious strength which sustains those whose labor is not in vain. Zzzwhat they d
Richard L. Maury (search for this): chapter 1.17
ary 1, 1864. The heroism of Huger, Kennon, Warley, Read, and others at the capture of New Orleans, fully attest the morale of the naval service, and the promise of its efficiency in a larger field, with better means of offensive action. Semmes in the Sumter and Alabama, Maffit in the Florida, with a bare handful of men, stricken with yellow fever, running the blockade of Mobile in the broad daylight, there refitting and passing again through the Federal fleet. Pegram in the Nashville, Maury in the Georgia, Wood in the Tallahassee, Wilkinson in the Chicamauga, Waddell in the Shenandoah, Read in the sailing ships Clarence, Tacony, and Archer, denied all rights in foreign ports, save those of belligerents, swept the seas bare of American commerce, and inflicted a damage the country has never recovered. In 1860, two-thirds of the commerce of America was carried in American bottoms. In 1863, three-fourths had been transferred to English registers. Zzzthe Alabama Claims. Th
Robert Edward Lee (search for this): chapter 1.17
The Confederate Navy. What it accomplished during the Civil War. [from the Richmond, Va., times, April 15 and 22, 1894.] A very interesting and valuable paper read before R. E. Lee Camp by Mr. Virginius Newton. This valuable resume is from a corrected copy kindly furnished by Mr. Newton, a live citizen of Richmond, whose agency is felt, if not proclaimed. His modesty would fain keep in the shade his merit. His heart holds all of the memorable past, as the readers of the Papers, as well as the local press, warmly know—Ed. Southern Historical Society papers. Several weeks ago Mr. Virginius Newton, of this city, was requested by the members of Lee Camp to read before that body a paper relating to some of the numerous episodes during the late war. Mr. Newton responded with the promptness of a gallant soldier, and selected as his subject the Confederate Navy and its noble deeds He succeeded in giving in the most condensed form a statement of the many noble deeds e
s of war; inflicted much damage to the enemy, put two of their vessels ashore in crippled condition, and by his presence at Vicksburg, brought suspense and confusion to the movements of the enemy in that quarter. A suspense so effective that when a month later, you abandoned and blew her up, in consequence of defective engines, Farragut telegraphed the Navy Department: It is the happiest moment of my life that I am able to inform the Department of the destruction of the ram Arkansas. Glassell, in his daring attempt to torpedo the new Ironsides off the port of Charleston, the night of October 5, 1864. Read in his captures on the high seas. His daring intrusion into the harbor of Portland, Maine, with the schooner Archer, and capture of the United States Revenue vessel Cushing. His subsequent dash, April 23, 1865, in the river steamer Webb, through the Federal fleet at the mouth of the Red River; running the gauntlet of the Federal fleet at New Orleans the day after. John
Leroy D. Grant (search for this): chapter 1.17
duction. The Mississippi (with its vast supplies so essential to your armies) was in your control, from Cairo to the Gulf, until Foote, from the North, and Farragut from the South, broke its barriers, and began that system of segregation which so pitilessly sapped your vital forces. The presence of the navy at Savannah and the seaboard, gave birth, in the brain of Sherman, to that relentless March to The Sea, which shook, for a time, even the morale of the army of Northern Virginia. Grant, in his Wilderness Campaign, foiled at every point, in his direct road to Richmond, sat down before Petersburg, his right wing in touch with the navy on the James, and that he be not shorn of this assistance, obstructed the river against the descent of your gunboats. The brief career of the Merrimac in Hampton Roads, delayed the advance of McClellan on the Peninsula—gave you the much needed time to put the defences of Richmond in order—evoked the memorable telegram to Fox, assistant secre
mac in Hampton Roads, March 8 and 9, 1862, and August 5, 1864, in Mobile Bay, need no recital here. Ingram, who had won national fame in 1853, in protecting American citizenship in Smyrna, in the Kostza case, at Charleston, 1863, and elsewhere, showed no decline of zeal in the maintenance of his cause. Cooke, at Roanoke Island and Elizabeth City, in February, 1862, though breasting a forlorn hope, showed the same spirit that won him deserved promotion, in the successful career of the Albemarle, in the engagements of April 19, and May 5, 1864, in Albemarle Sound. Zzzaction of the Arkansas. Brown (in the ill equipped Arkansas), on the Mississippi River, July 15, 1862, ran the gauntlet of the Federal fleet of four ironclads, eight rams, four gunboats, and two ships of war; inflicted much damage to the enemy, put two of their vessels ashore in crippled condition, and by his presence at Vicksburg, brought suspense and confusion to the movements of the enemy in that quarter.
efore the army was in position—and a few days later was its left wing at Fort Donelson, contributing material aid in its reduction. The Mississippi (with its vast supplies so essential to your armies) was in your control, from Cairo to the Gulf, until Foote, from the North, and Farragut from the South, broke its barriers, and began that system of segregation which so pitilessly sapped your vital forces. The presence of the navy at Savannah and the seaboard, gave birth, in the brain of Sherman, to that relentless March to The Sea, which shook, for a time, even the morale of the army of Northern Virginia. Grant, in his Wilderness Campaign, foiled at every point, in his direct road to Richmond, sat down before Petersburg, his right wing in touch with the navy on the James, and that he be not shorn of this assistance, obstructed the river against the descent of your gunboats. The brief career of the Merrimac in Hampton Roads, delayed the advance of McClellan on the Peninsula—g
hers, still, set to work to manufacture your ordnance—ordnance stores and supplies. The ordnance works at Richmond, under Commander Brooke, Lieutenants Minor and Wright, supplied the equipment of your vessels in the James, and at Wilmington, carriages for heavy guns in shore-batteries, and between May, ‘61 and ‘62, shipped to New Orleans, 220 heavy guns, many of them the efficient banded rifle gun, the invention of Commander John M. Brooke. The ordnance works at Charlotte, N. C., under Ramsay, chief engineer, C. S. N. (who had seen service in the Merrimac), supplied heavy forgings, shafting for steamers, wrought-iron projectiles, gun carriages, blocks, ordnance equipment of every kind, and an ordnance laboratory. Commander Catesby Ap. R. Jones, (late executive officer of the Merrimac), at Selma, Ala., superintended the various branches of a foundry, and the manufacture of heavy guns, forty-seven of which were used in the defences of Mobile and Charleston. At Atlanta, Ga., L<
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