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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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rn Virginia. Grant, in his Wilderness Campaign, foiled at every point, in his direct road to Richmond, sat down before Petersburg, his right wing in touch with the navy on the James, and that he be not shorn of this assistance, obstructed the river against the descent of your gunboats. The brief career of the Merrimac in Hampton Roads, delayed the advance of McClellan on the Peninsula—gave you the much needed time to put the defences of Richmond in order—evoked the memorable telegram to Fox, assistant secretary of navy: Can I rely upon the Monitor to keep the Merrimac in check, so that I can make Fort Monroe a base of operations, and as late as the 12th of March, 1862, the lamentation of General Barnard, his chief of engineers: The possibility of the Merrimac appearing again, paralyzes the movement of this army by whatsoever route is adopted. Zzzimportance of Blockades. The rigid blockade of your ports from the Chesapeake Bay to the Rio Grande, cut off the Confederacy f
April, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 1.17
ou had never produced a sufficiency of iron in times of peace, and now, with the advent of war to increase its uses, the price rose from $25 to $1,300 per ton. No powder was stored in any of the Southern States, except in small quantities. That captured at Norfolk, and in some arsenals, amounted, it is said, to sixty thousand pounds. The stock of percussion caps was less than 500,000, and not a machine for making them could be found in the South. Colonel Gorgas says: We began in April, 1861, without an arsenal, laboratory or powder mill of any capacity, and with no foundry or rolling mill, except at Richmond. During the harassments of war, holding our own in the field defiantly and successfully, against a powerful enemy; crippled by a depreciated currency, throttled by a blockade, which prevented our getting material or workmen; obliged to send almost every able-bodied man into the field; unable to use slave labor, except in the most unskilled departments; hampered by want
April 23rd, 1865 AD (search for this): chapter 1.17
gines, Farragut telegraphed the Navy Department: It is the happiest moment of my life that I am able to inform the Department of the destruction of the ram Arkansas. Glassell, in his daring attempt to torpedo the new Ironsides off the port of Charleston, the night of October 5, 1864. Read in his captures on the high seas. His daring intrusion into the harbor of Portland, Maine, with the schooner Archer, and capture of the United States Revenue vessel Cushing. His subsequent dash, April 23, 1865, in the river steamer Webb, through the Federal fleet at the mouth of the Red River; running the gauntlet of the Federal fleet at New Orleans the day after. John Taylor Wood, in his many daring captures by boarding, culminating in the boarding and capture of the United States gunboat Underwriter, in the Neuse River, within pistol shot of two of the enemy's forts, the night of February 1, 1864. The heroism of Huger, Kennon, Warley, Read, and others at the capture of New Orleans, ful
April 19th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 1.17
d 9, 1862, and August 5, 1864, in Mobile Bay, need no recital here. Ingram, who had won national fame in 1853, in protecting American citizenship in Smyrna, in the Kostza case, at Charleston, 1863, and elsewhere, showed no decline of zeal in the maintenance of his cause. Cooke, at Roanoke Island and Elizabeth City, in February, 1862, though breasting a forlorn hope, showed the same spirit that won him deserved promotion, in the successful career of the Albemarle, in the engagements of April 19, and May 5, 1864, in Albemarle Sound. Zzzaction of the Arkansas. Brown (in the ill equipped Arkansas), on the Mississippi River, July 15, 1862, ran the gauntlet of the Federal fleet of four ironclads, eight rams, four gunboats, and two ships of war; inflicted much damage to the enemy, put two of their vessels ashore in crippled condition, and by his presence at Vicksburg, brought suspense and confusion to the movements of the enemy in that quarter. A suspense so effective that whe
February, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 1.17
nd experience were necessary to adjust a scheme of taxation to the condition of your people, and to put in running order the machinery for collection of revenue. Expenses had already begun, and demands for large sums of money, for immediate use, were urgent. The treasury of the common country was in possession of your enemies; save the paltry sum of $500,000 in the mint at New Orleans; paltry to a nation in pressing need of millions. The receipts of the Confederate Government from February, 1861, to August, 1862—eighteen months—were $302,500,000, its expenditures, $347,300,000, and of this vast sum, but fourteen and a half millions were appropriated to the building and equipment of a navy. You had officers sufficient, many of them already of national fame, of large experience and great abilities, but no ships, no seamen. Can you create an army without men and without muskets? The task of the Israelites in Egypt pales in the contrast; the labors of Sisyphus were not more hop
October 5th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 1.17
by his presence at Vicksburg, brought suspense and confusion to the movements of the enemy in that quarter. A suspense so effective that when a month later, you abandoned and blew her up, in consequence of defective engines, Farragut telegraphed the Navy Department: It is the happiest moment of my life that I am able to inform the Department of the destruction of the ram Arkansas. Glassell, in his daring attempt to torpedo the new Ironsides off the port of Charleston, the night of October 5, 1864. Read in his captures on the high seas. His daring intrusion into the harbor of Portland, Maine, with the schooner Archer, and capture of the United States Revenue vessel Cushing. His subsequent dash, April 23, 1865, in the river steamer Webb, through the Federal fleet at the mouth of the Red River; running the gauntlet of the Federal fleet at New Orleans the day after. John Taylor Wood, in his many daring captures by boarding, culminating in the boarding and capture of the Unit
January 31st, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 1.17
y two tugboats lashed to her sides, were incapable of stemming the current in the river, and her utility became that simply of a battery located on the river front. When Farragut had passed Forts Jackson and St. Philip, his fleet of twenty-four vessels of war, mounting 227 guns, engaged the Confederate fleet of four river steamers, the so-called ironclad Manassas, and the Louisiana moored to the river bank; in all five vessels, mounting twenty-eight guns. Zzzbroke the blockade. January 31, 1863, your ironclads, Palmetto State and Chicora, broke the blockade at Charleston, S. C., dispersed the Federal fleet, and secured the surrender of two ships, the Mercedita and Keystone State, but the victory was shorn of its triumphs by the ability of these vessels, subsequently, to elude the pursuit of our slow steaming ships. August 5th, 1864, when Farragut had passed Forts Morgan and Gaines, guarding the entrance to Mobile Bay, his fleet of four monitors and fourteen ships, mounting
December, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 1.17
lothing, shoes, tools, ammunition and munitions of war—threw you back upon the undeveloped resources of an agricultural people; added ten-fold to the hardships of your troops in the field; restricted your captures upon the high seas; and contributed in material, if not in equal portion, to your final overthrow on land. The navy of your common country, which, at the beginning of hostilities, numbered some ninety war ships, of various classes, fell into the hands of the Federals, and by December, 1861, was augmented, by superior facilities, to 264 vessels, mounting 2,557 guns, with 22,000 seamen. Of the ten navy yards, the property of your common country, eight were located in the Northern States, and but two, Norfolk and Pensacola, were in the South. The Pensacola yard was one merely for shelter and repair. From that at Norfolk came the guns and ammunition that did service in the whole South, afloat and ashore, the first years of the war. The number of officers in the navy of
August, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 1.17
necessary to adjust a scheme of taxation to the condition of your people, and to put in running order the machinery for collection of revenue. Expenses had already begun, and demands for large sums of money, for immediate use, were urgent. The treasury of the common country was in possession of your enemies; save the paltry sum of $500,000 in the mint at New Orleans; paltry to a nation in pressing need of millions. The receipts of the Confederate Government from February, 1861, to August, 1862—eighteen months—were $302,500,000, its expenditures, $347,300,000, and of this vast sum, but fourteen and a half millions were appropriated to the building and equipment of a navy. You had officers sufficient, many of them already of national fame, of large experience and great abilities, but no ships, no seamen. Can you create an army without men and without muskets? The task of the Israelites in Egypt pales in the contrast; the labors of Sisyphus were not more hopeless. What cou
March 12th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 1.17
n the James, and that he be not shorn of this assistance, obstructed the river against the descent of your gunboats. The brief career of the Merrimac in Hampton Roads, delayed the advance of McClellan on the Peninsula—gave you the much needed time to put the defences of Richmond in order—evoked the memorable telegram to Fox, assistant secretary of navy: Can I rely upon the Monitor to keep the Merrimac in check, so that I can make Fort Monroe a base of operations, and as late as the 12th of March, 1862, the lamentation of General Barnard, his chief of engineers: The possibility of the Merrimac appearing again, paralyzes the movement of this army by whatsoever route is adopted. Zzzimportance of Blockades. The rigid blockade of your ports from the Chesapeake Bay to the Rio Grande, cut off the Confederacy from the markets of the world; deprived you of clothing, shoes, tools, ammunition and munitions of war—threw you back upon the undeveloped resources of an agricultural people;<
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