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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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a., where his father, the Rev. Charles C. Taliaferro, was in charge of the parish. His parents died before he was three years old, and he was then taken in charge by his uncle, Dr. Taliaferro, who soon afterwards removed to Orange county, Va., which county has been his home for the greater part of his life. At the breaking out of the civil war he entered the army before he was eighteen years old. On July 1, 1861, he enlisted in the First Company, Richmond Howitzers, but was transferred in October following to the Black Horse Battalion, where he remained for two years. He then joined Co. F, of the Sixth Virginia Cavalry, where he remained until the close of the war. He participated in all the cavalry battles and engagements of the cavalry of the Army of Northern Virginia, such as Brandy Station, Spotsylvania Courthouse, First and Second Manassas, Sharpsburg. He followed General Stuart around McClellan's army and assisted in the burning of all the supplies of the latter at Whitehouse
colleagues, he is gifted with a high degree of common sense. His arguments are often drastic, but always to the point, and the brightness of his power of conception naturally makes him one of the most prominent leaders of his party, and his influence is felt as soon as he rises in his seat to give the House his counsel and advice on any measure in which he takes an interest. Richard Lewis. Mr. Richard Lewis, the present member of the House of Delegates from Culpeper county, was born in 1838, in the adjoining county of Fauquier, and was actively engaged in farming until the outbreak of the war, when he enlisted in the Black Horse Battalion, going at once to the scene of the John Brown raid. Immediately after the battle of Chancellorsville he was detailed as a scout, acting under the direct orders of Generals J. E. B. Stuart and R. E. Lee. He was repeatedly commended by both commanders for his courage and faithfulness. During the fight in the Wilderness he was severely wounded,
January 26th, 1842 AD (search for this): chapter 1.39
he House, ran against him as an independent candidate, but was defeated. While Mr. Lewis is not much given to public speaking on account of his modest and retiring disposition, yet he is well known to all connected with the General Assembly as the author of the various military bills that have been introduced in the House during the present session. Charles C. Taliaferro. Mr. Charles C. Taliaferro, the present representative of Orange county in the House of Delegates, was born on January 26, 1842, in Martinsburg, W. Va., where his father, the Rev. Charles C. Taliaferro, was in charge of the parish. His parents died before he was three years old, and he was then taken in charge by his uncle, Dr. Taliaferro, who soon afterwards removed to Orange county, Va., which county has been his home for the greater part of his life. At the breaking out of the civil war he entered the army before he was eighteen years old. On July 1, 1861, he enlisted in the First Company, Richmond Howitzer
assiers of old, and used their pistols with the truth and nerve of expert marksmen. They so familiarized themselves with the country in which they operated, that they kept the enemy continuously speculating on their movements by checkmating them at every point in the game of war, and achieved such prestige by their strange ubiquity and stratagem that the name of their little legion became a watchword for danger and a signal for action with the Union troops. The Black Horse was organized in 1859, just two years before the war broke out, and first figured at Harper's Ferry in the John Brown raid. Colonel John Scott, of Warrenton, Virginia, was its first captain, and gave the troop its name. Colonel Scott, who has retired from active life, was for many years a conspicuous figure in that section of the State as Commonwealth's Attorney, and is well known as the author of The Lost Principle, a Life of Mosby, and other literary works. Its next commander was the gallant Bob Randolph, o
May 18th, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 1.39
Colonel John Scott, of Warrenton, Virginia, was its first captain, and gave the troop its name. Colonel Scott, who has retired from active life, was for many years a conspicuous figure in that section of the State as Commonwealth's Attorney, and is well known as the author of The Lost Principle, a Life of Mosby, and other literary works. Its next commander was the gallant Bob Randolph, of the distinguished family of that name, and who was afterwards promoted to Colonel. On the 18th of May, 1861, the following officers of the Black Horse were sworne in: William H. Payne, captain; Robert Randolph, C. H. Gordon, A. D. Payne, lieutenants; Willian Smith, James H. Childs, Robert Mitchell, Richard Lewis, sergeants; Willington Millon, Madison C. Tyler, George N. Shumate, N. A. Clopton, corporals; William Johnson, bugler, and William E. Gaskins, quartermaster. They were subsequently incorporated into the Fourth Virginia Regiment, and permission was given to recruit it for a battalion.
July 1st, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 1.39
ange county in the House of Delegates, was born on January 26, 1842, in Martinsburg, W. Va., where his father, the Rev. Charles C. Taliaferro, was in charge of the parish. His parents died before he was three years old, and he was then taken in charge by his uncle, Dr. Taliaferro, who soon afterwards removed to Orange county, Va., which county has been his home for the greater part of his life. At the breaking out of the civil war he entered the army before he was eighteen years old. On July 1, 1861, he enlisted in the First Company, Richmond Howitzers, but was transferred in October following to the Black Horse Battalion, where he remained for two years. He then joined Co. F, of the Sixth Virginia Cavalry, where he remained until the close of the war. He participated in all the cavalry battles and engagements of the cavalry of the Army of Northern Virginia, such as Brandy Station, Spotsylvania Courthouse, First and Second Manassas, Sharpsburg. He followed General Stuart around McCl
rps entered Boonesboro, he sent a squad of the Black Horse, commanded by Lieutenant A. D. Payne, through the town to picket the approaches from the opposite direction. Lieutenant Payne had nineteen men and the charge was against twenty times their number, but General Jackson was saved from capture. It was a desperate charge and the enemy was deceived and routed. Payne remarked to his men: We must relieve our general at all hazards. I rely upon your courage to save him. In the winter of 1862-‘63, the Black Horse occupied their native heath, and scouted the counties of Fauquier and Stafford thoroughly, reporting all the movements of the enemy to Generals Lee and Jackson, who complimented them for their effective service. They participated in the various engagements of Stuart with Pleasanton's cavalry, and in the fight at Waynesboro against Sheridan's famous cohorts, the Black Horse was the leading squadron of the Fourth Virginia. It was in this battle that one of Sheridan's capt
cond Manassas, Sharpsburg. He followed General Stuart around McClellan's army and assisted in the burning of all the supplies of the latter at Whitehouse. With two comrades, William Smoot, of Alexandria, and another one by the name of Green, he joined the Seventeenth Virginia Infantry and fought with them at Cold Harbor, Frazier's farm, and Malvern Hill. After the war Mr. Taliaferro went to Mississippi, where he taught school at Greenville, and from there he removed to Macon, Ga., and in 1870 to Savannah, where he conducted a private school until 1882. In October, 1881, he married a Miss Barclay, of Savannah, and upon the death of his wife in 1892 he returned to Virginia, to his old homestead in Orange county. His family residence is one of the old homesteads in this country that have been deeded from the crown by George III, and which has never passed from the possession of his family. Mr. Taliaferro never took an active part in politics until the Cleveland election in 1892
October, 1881 AD (search for this): chapter 1.39
rmy and assisted in the burning of all the supplies of the latter at Whitehouse. With two comrades, William Smoot, of Alexandria, and another one by the name of Green, he joined the Seventeenth Virginia Infantry and fought with them at Cold Harbor, Frazier's farm, and Malvern Hill. After the war Mr. Taliaferro went to Mississippi, where he taught school at Greenville, and from there he removed to Macon, Ga., and in 1870 to Savannah, where he conducted a private school until 1882. In October, 1881, he married a Miss Barclay, of Savannah, and upon the death of his wife in 1892 he returned to Virginia, to his old homestead in Orange county. His family residence is one of the old homesteads in this country that have been deeded from the crown by George III, and which has never passed from the possession of his family. Mr. Taliaferro never took an active part in politics until the Cleveland election in 1892. Last fall he entered into a contest with Mr. George Barbour, and during
d McClellan's army and assisted in the burning of all the supplies of the latter at Whitehouse. With two comrades, William Smoot, of Alexandria, and another one by the name of Green, he joined the Seventeenth Virginia Infantry and fought with them at Cold Harbor, Frazier's farm, and Malvern Hill. After the war Mr. Taliaferro went to Mississippi, where he taught school at Greenville, and from there he removed to Macon, Ga., and in 1870 to Savannah, where he conducted a private school until 1882. In October, 1881, he married a Miss Barclay, of Savannah, and upon the death of his wife in 1892 he returned to Virginia, to his old homestead in Orange county. His family residence is one of the old homesteads in this country that have been deeded from the crown by George III, and which has never passed from the possession of his family. Mr. Taliaferro never took an active part in politics until the Cleveland election in 1892. Last fall he entered into a contest with Mr. George Barbo
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