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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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William H. Triplett (search for this): chapter 1.39
, Downrnans, Diggses, Edmonds, Fants, Greens, Gordons, Gaskinses, Georges, Helmns, Huntons, Hamiltons, Keiths, Lewises, Lees, Lomaxes, Lathams, Martins, Paynes, Rectors, Scotts, Smiths, Striblings, Talliaferros, and Vapes. Other families were represented by Lawrence Ashton, William Bowen, J. E. Barbour, William Ficklin, R. A. Grey, Alexander Hunter, Robert Hart, George L. Holland, Strother Jones, T. N. Pilcher, John Robinson, James Rector, W. A. Smoot, William Spilman, W. B. Skinker, William H. Triplett, Madison Tyler, Johnsie Longue, J. W. Towson, W. N. Thorn, Melville Withers, and others. In its operations, until the army began its movement from Manassas to Yorktown, the Black Horse, being familiar with the counties of Prince William, Fauquier, and Culpeper, through which the army was about to cross, and having a complete knowledge of the roads, water-courses, and points suitable for camping, was of great value in furnishing guides, for which purpose large details were made from
Melville Withers (search for this): chapter 1.39
lmns, Huntons, Hamiltons, Keiths, Lewises, Lees, Lomaxes, Lathams, Martins, Paynes, Rectors, Scotts, Smiths, Striblings, Talliaferros, and Vapes. Other families were represented by Lawrence Ashton, William Bowen, J. E. Barbour, William Ficklin, R. A. Grey, Alexander Hunter, Robert Hart, George L. Holland, Strother Jones, T. N. Pilcher, John Robinson, James Rector, W. A. Smoot, William Spilman, W. B. Skinker, William H. Triplett, Madison Tyler, Johnsie Longue, J. W. Towson, W. N. Thorn, Melville Withers, and others. In its operations, until the army began its movement from Manassas to Yorktown, the Black Horse, being familiar with the counties of Prince William, Fauquier, and Culpeper, through which the army was about to cross, and having a complete knowledge of the roads, water-courses, and points suitable for camping, was of great value in furnishing guides, for which purpose large details were made from it. In that famous charge at the battle of Williamsburg, with all the colo
William E. Green (search for this): chapter 1.39
joined Co. F, of the Sixth Virginia Cavalry, where he remained until the close of the war. He participated in all the cavalry battles and engagements of the cavalry of the Army of Northern Virginia, such as Brandy Station, Spotsylvania Courthouse, First and Second Manassas, Sharpsburg. He followed General Stuart around McClellan's army and assisted in the burning of all the supplies of the latter at Whitehouse. With two comrades, William Smoot, of Alexandria, and another one by the name of Green, he joined the Seventeenth Virginia Infantry and fought with them at Cold Harbor, Frazier's farm, and Malvern Hill. After the war Mr. Taliaferro went to Mississippi, where he taught school at Greenville, and from there he removed to Macon, Ga., and in 1870 to Savannah, where he conducted a private school until 1882. In October, 1881, he married a Miss Barclay, of Savannah, and upon the death of his wife in 1892 he returned to Virginia, to his old homestead in Orange county. His family
on of the Fourth Virginia. It was in this battle that one of Sheridan's captains displayed great valor, wounding four of the Black Horse with his sabre; and leading a charge, his men following but a short distance, the gallant Yankee captain dashed on without looking behind and was unaccompanied, into the very head of the Black column. Not wishing to cut down so dashing a fellow, who had put himself in their power, no one fired at him. Some of the men knocked him from his horse, when Captain Henry Lee observing a Masonic sign, rushed to his assistance, and saved him from further harm. Mr. Hugh Hamilton, an old Black Horseman, who is now treasurer of Fauquier county, in relating his reminiscences of those times, said the other day with a smile playing over his bland and goodna-tured features: When we boys were not in the thick of the fight, or engaged in carrying news and scouting, we were not supine. With no Federals to shoot or watch, we would have fun over an imprompture fox
ne hundred men, and its fine appearance had begun to attract the attention of the great cavalry leaders under Lee, and it was appointed to serve as a body guard to General Joseph E. Johnston. Deeds of daring. The families of Fauquier and adjoining counties, from each of which two or more members of the Black Horse had been recruited, were the Carters, Childses, Colberts, Downrnans, Diggses, Edmonds, Fants, Greens, Gordons, Gaskinses, Georges, Helmns, Huntons, Hamiltons, Keiths, Lewises, Lees, Lomaxes, Lathams, Martins, Paynes, Rectors, Scotts, Smiths, Striblings, Talliaferros, and Vapes. Other families were represented by Lawrence Ashton, William Bowen, J. E. Barbour, William Ficklin, R. A. Grey, Alexander Hunter, Robert Hart, George L. Holland, Strother Jones, T. N. Pilcher, John Robinson, James Rector, W. A. Smoot, William Spilman, W. B. Skinker, William H. Triplett, Madison Tyler, Johnsie Longue, J. W. Towson, W. N. Thorn, Melville Withers, and others. In its operations, u
Raphael S. Payne (search for this): chapter 1.39
and a brilliant tribute to his memory by the members of the Warrenton bar appears on the minutes of the court. At the close of the war, when the Black Horse disbanded at Warrenton, General Payne delivered a valedictory to the men from his saddle, which is said, by those who were present, to have been a gem of emotional eloquence. Three members in the House. The above brief outline of the history of the famous Black Horse Troop, taken from an article written on the subject by Mr. Raphael S. Payne, is highly interesting to all who have the history of Virginia at heart, and especially in connection with the present session of the General Assembly, when it becomes known that three survivors of the gallant Black Horse are at present members of the House of Delegates, namely, Messrs. T. C. Pilcher, of Fauquier; Richard Lewis, of Culpeper, and Charles C. Talliaferro, of Orange. Mr. Pilcher, one of the five members who have been sent to the House by their constituents three times
ustained march of the Black Horse was to Harper's Ferry. It afterwards advanced to Manassas and Fairfax Courthouse; its work at the battle of Bull Run was so graphically reported by the Union troops that further comment is unnecessary. The company numbered over one hundred men, and its fine appearance had begun to attract the attention of the great cavalry leaders under Lee, and it was appointed to serve as a body guard to General Joseph E. Johnston. Deeds of daring. The families of Fauquier and adjoining counties, from each of which two or more members of the Black Horse had been recruited, were the Carters, Childses, Colberts, Downrnans, Diggses, Edmonds, Fants, Greens, Gordons, Gaskinses, Georges, Helmns, Huntons, Hamiltons, Keiths, Lewises, Lees, Lomaxes, Lathams, Martins, Paynes, Rectors, Scotts, Smiths, Striblings, Talliaferros, and Vapes. Other families were represented by Lawrence Ashton, William Bowen, J. E. Barbour, William Ficklin, R. A. Grey, Alexander Hunter, Robe
James E. B. Stuart (search for this): chapter 1.39
ce on any measure in which he takes an interest. Richard Lewis. Mr. Richard Lewis, the present member of the House of Delegates from Culpeper county, was born in 1838, in the adjoining county of Fauquier, and was actively engaged in farming until the outbreak of the war, when he enlisted in the Black Horse Battalion, going at once to the scene of the John Brown raid. Immediately after the battle of Chancellorsville he was detailed as a scout, acting under the direct orders of Generals J. E. B. Stuart and R. E. Lee. He was repeatedly commended by both commanders for his courage and faithfulness. During the fight in the Wilderness he was severely wounded, but recovered, and was enabled to be at the side of General Stuart at his death. On one occasion, while scouting along the railroad in the lines of the enemy with another scout, he was suddenly confronted by four Yankee officers, who commanded him to surrender In the fight that followed, two of the officers were killed and o
William Bowen (search for this): chapter 1.39
to General Joseph E. Johnston. Deeds of daring. The families of Fauquier and adjoining counties, from each of which two or more members of the Black Horse had been recruited, were the Carters, Childses, Colberts, Downrnans, Diggses, Edmonds, Fants, Greens, Gordons, Gaskinses, Georges, Helmns, Huntons, Hamiltons, Keiths, Lewises, Lees, Lomaxes, Lathams, Martins, Paynes, Rectors, Scotts, Smiths, Striblings, Talliaferros, and Vapes. Other families were represented by Lawrence Ashton, William Bowen, J. E. Barbour, William Ficklin, R. A. Grey, Alexander Hunter, Robert Hart, George L. Holland, Strother Jones, T. N. Pilcher, John Robinson, James Rector, W. A. Smoot, William Spilman, W. B. Skinker, William H. Triplett, Madison Tyler, Johnsie Longue, J. W. Towson, W. N. Thorn, Melville Withers, and others. In its operations, until the army began its movement from Manassas to Yorktown, the Black Horse, being familiar with the counties of Prince William, Fauquier, and Culpeper, through
he sable plumes of the Black Horse waved, and when Colonel Wickham was pierced through the body, General, then Major William H. Payne, took command, and was himself next day badly wounded. Details were at that time made from the Black Horse to carry dispatches between the general commanding, and Fort McGruder. Judge James Keith, of the present Court of Appeals of Virginia, then a private in the company, is said to have made many marvelous escapes, and greatly distinguished himself. General Longstreet, wishing men for picket duty, after failing to secure a guide from that section of the country, was much annoyed, when General Stuart remarked that he always counted on the Black Horse in emergencies. Send to it, Stuart said, and you will be furnished with a guide to any point in Virginia. It so happened that some of the men had attended William and Mary College as students, and knew the roads as well as their own in Fauquier. The Black Horse took part in the raid around McClellan,
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