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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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W. B. Skinker (search for this): chapter 1.39
Childses, Colberts, Downrnans, Diggses, Edmonds, Fants, Greens, Gordons, Gaskinses, Georges, Helmns, Huntons, Hamiltons, Keiths, Lewises, Lees, Lomaxes, Lathams, Martins, Paynes, Rectors, Scotts, Smiths, Striblings, Talliaferros, and Vapes. Other families were represented by Lawrence Ashton, William Bowen, J. E. Barbour, William Ficklin, R. A. Grey, Alexander Hunter, Robert Hart, George L. Holland, Strother Jones, T. N. Pilcher, John Robinson, James Rector, W. A. Smoot, William Spilman, W. B. Skinker, William H. Triplett, Madison Tyler, Johnsie Longue, J. W. Towson, W. N. Thorn, Melville Withers, and others. In its operations, until the army began its movement from Manassas to Yorktown, the Black Horse, being familiar with the counties of Prince William, Fauquier, and Culpeper, through which the army was about to cross, and having a complete knowledge of the roads, water-courses, and points suitable for camping, was of great value in furnishing guides, for which purpose large deta
C. H. Gordon (search for this): chapter 1.39
o has retired from active life, was for many years a conspicuous figure in that section of the State as Commonwealth's Attorney, and is well known as the author of The Lost Principle, a Life of Mosby, and other literary works. Its next commander was the gallant Bob Randolph, of the distinguished family of that name, and who was afterwards promoted to Colonel. On the 18th of May, 1861, the following officers of the Black Horse were sworne in: William H. Payne, captain; Robert Randolph, C. H. Gordon, A. D. Payne, lieutenants; Willian Smith, James H. Childs, Robert Mitchell, Richard Lewis, sergeants; Willington Millon, Madison C. Tyler, George N. Shumate, N. A. Clopton, corporals; William Johnson, bugler, and William E. Gaskins, quartermaster. They were subsequently incorporated into the Fourth Virginia Regiment, and permission was given to recruit it for a battalion. The first sustained march of the Black Horse was to Harper's Ferry. It afterwards advanced to Manassas and Fairfax
James Keith (search for this): chapter 1.39
he columns, with not a sabre or pistol drawn in the whole regiment, and impeded by a dense wood, where they had run into the mouth of McClellan's army of fifty thousand strong, the sable plumes of the Black Horse waved, and when Colonel Wickham was pierced through the body, General, then Major William H. Payne, took command, and was himself next day badly wounded. Details were at that time made from the Black Horse to carry dispatches between the general commanding, and Fort McGruder. Judge James Keith, of the present Court of Appeals of Virginia, then a private in the company, is said to have made many marvelous escapes, and greatly distinguished himself. General Longstreet, wishing men for picket duty, after failing to secure a guide from that section of the country, was much annoyed, when General Stuart remarked that he always counted on the Black Horse in emergencies. Send to it, Stuart said, and you will be furnished with a guide to any point in Virginia. It so happened tha
Stonewall Jackson (search for this): chapter 1.39
future movements upon General Pope, was of great service. Stonewall Jackson soon discovered what good stuff the Black Horse was composed k with half of the troopers to meet General Lee, who was following Jackson when marching against Pope's great army. It is said that the Blact the second battle of Manassas, they were engaged in carrying General Jackson's orders to and fro between the various commanders of the trooe Black Horse offered their beautiful chargers to Generals Lee and Jackson when they marched into Maryland. In the first Maryland campaign, before General Jackson's corps entered Boonesboro, he sent a squad of the Black Horse, commanded by Lieutenant A. D. Payne, through the tow men and the charge was against twenty times their number, but General Jackson was saved from capture. It was a desperate charge and the eneghly, reporting all the movements of the enemy to Generals Lee and Jackson, who complimented them for their effective service. They particip
heir little legion became a watchword for danger and a signal for action with the Union troops. The Black Horse was organized in 1859, just two years before the war broke out, and first figured at Harper's Ferry in the John Brown raid. Colonel John Scott, of Warrenton, Virginia, was its first captain, and gave the troop its name. Colonel Scott, who has retired from active life, was for many years a conspicuous figure in that section of the State as Commonwealth's Attorney, and is well knowColonel Scott, who has retired from active life, was for many years a conspicuous figure in that section of the State as Commonwealth's Attorney, and is well known as the author of The Lost Principle, a Life of Mosby, and other literary works. Its next commander was the gallant Bob Randolph, of the distinguished family of that name, and who was afterwards promoted to Colonel. On the 18th of May, 1861, the following officers of the Black Horse were sworne in: William H. Payne, captain; Robert Randolph, C. H. Gordon, A. D. Payne, lieutenants; Willian Smith, James H. Childs, Robert Mitchell, Richard Lewis, sergeants; Willington Millon, Madison C. Tyler
e Black Horse and its commanders. One of the most gallant, serviceable, and picturesque contingents of the Army of Northern Virginia, was that famous company of cavalry known as the Black Horse Troop, which won such bright laurels for its daring exploits, and the valuable information and aid it rendeered the Confederate commanders in some of the greatest engagements of the Civil war. In many respects it was a remarable body of men, composed as it was, of handsome, strapping, debonair Virginians, admirably horsed and equipped, in whose natures the spirit of chivalry was an abiding trait that marked the flight of their banner from the outbreak to the close of the war. They wielded their sabres like the cuirassiers of old, and used their pistols with the truth and nerve of expert marksmen. They so familiarized themselves with the country in which they operated, that they kept the enemy continuously speculating on their movements by checkmating them at every point in the game of
J. W. Towson (search for this): chapter 1.39
rdons, Gaskinses, Georges, Helmns, Huntons, Hamiltons, Keiths, Lewises, Lees, Lomaxes, Lathams, Martins, Paynes, Rectors, Scotts, Smiths, Striblings, Talliaferros, and Vapes. Other families were represented by Lawrence Ashton, William Bowen, J. E. Barbour, William Ficklin, R. A. Grey, Alexander Hunter, Robert Hart, George L. Holland, Strother Jones, T. N. Pilcher, John Robinson, James Rector, W. A. Smoot, William Spilman, W. B. Skinker, William H. Triplett, Madison Tyler, Johnsie Longue, J. W. Towson, W. N. Thorn, Melville Withers, and others. In its operations, until the army began its movement from Manassas to Yorktown, the Black Horse, being familiar with the counties of Prince William, Fauquier, and Culpeper, through which the army was about to cross, and having a complete knowledge of the roads, water-courses, and points suitable for camping, was of great value in furnishing guides, for which purpose large details were made from it. In that famous charge at the battle of Wi
William Johnson (search for this): chapter 1.39
, and other literary works. Its next commander was the gallant Bob Randolph, of the distinguished family of that name, and who was afterwards promoted to Colonel. On the 18th of May, 1861, the following officers of the Black Horse were sworne in: William H. Payne, captain; Robert Randolph, C. H. Gordon, A. D. Payne, lieutenants; Willian Smith, James H. Childs, Robert Mitchell, Richard Lewis, sergeants; Willington Millon, Madison C. Tyler, George N. Shumate, N. A. Clopton, corporals; William Johnson, bugler, and William E. Gaskins, quartermaster. They were subsequently incorporated into the Fourth Virginia Regiment, and permission was given to recruit it for a battalion. The first sustained march of the Black Horse was to Harper's Ferry. It afterwards advanced to Manassas and Fairfax Courthouse; its work at the battle of Bull Run was so graphically reported by the Union troops that further comment is unnecessary. The company numbered over one hundred men, and its fine appearanc
N. A. Clopton (search for this): chapter 1.39
Principle, a Life of Mosby, and other literary works. Its next commander was the gallant Bob Randolph, of the distinguished family of that name, and who was afterwards promoted to Colonel. On the 18th of May, 1861, the following officers of the Black Horse were sworne in: William H. Payne, captain; Robert Randolph, C. H. Gordon, A. D. Payne, lieutenants; Willian Smith, James H. Childs, Robert Mitchell, Richard Lewis, sergeants; Willington Millon, Madison C. Tyler, George N. Shumate, N. A. Clopton, corporals; William Johnson, bugler, and William E. Gaskins, quartermaster. They were subsequently incorporated into the Fourth Virginia Regiment, and permission was given to recruit it for a battalion. The first sustained march of the Black Horse was to Harper's Ferry. It afterwards advanced to Manassas and Fairfax Courthouse; its work at the battle of Bull Run was so graphically reported by the Union troops that further comment is unnecessary. The company numbered over one hundred
Robert Hart (search for this): chapter 1.39
er and adjoining counties, from each of which two or more members of the Black Horse had been recruited, were the Carters, Childses, Colberts, Downrnans, Diggses, Edmonds, Fants, Greens, Gordons, Gaskinses, Georges, Helmns, Huntons, Hamiltons, Keiths, Lewises, Lees, Lomaxes, Lathams, Martins, Paynes, Rectors, Scotts, Smiths, Striblings, Talliaferros, and Vapes. Other families were represented by Lawrence Ashton, William Bowen, J. E. Barbour, William Ficklin, R. A. Grey, Alexander Hunter, Robert Hart, George L. Holland, Strother Jones, T. N. Pilcher, John Robinson, James Rector, W. A. Smoot, William Spilman, W. B. Skinker, William H. Triplett, Madison Tyler, Johnsie Longue, J. W. Towson, W. N. Thorn, Melville Withers, and others. In its operations, until the army began its movement from Manassas to Yorktown, the Black Horse, being familiar with the counties of Prince William, Fauquier, and Culpeper, through which the army was about to cross, and having a complete knowledge of the r
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