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Martinsburg (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.39
im as an independent candidate, but was defeated. While Mr. Lewis is not much given to public speaking on account of his modest and retiring disposition, yet he is well known to all connected with the General Assembly as the author of the various military bills that have been introduced in the House during the present session. Charles C. Taliaferro. Mr. Charles C. Taliaferro, the present representative of Orange county in the House of Delegates, was born on January 26, 1842, in Martinsburg, W. Va., where his father, the Rev. Charles C. Taliaferro, was in charge of the parish. His parents died before he was three years old, and he was then taken in charge by his uncle, Dr. Taliaferro, who soon afterwards removed to Orange county, Va., which county has been his home for the greater part of his life. At the breaking out of the civil war he entered the army before he was eighteen years old. On July 1, 1861, he enlisted in the First Company, Richmond Howitzers, but was transferred
Stafford (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.39
ceived and routed. Payne remarked to his men: We must relieve our general at all hazards. I rely upon your courage to save him. In the winter of 1862-‘63, the Black Horse occupied their native heath, and scouted the counties of Fauquier and Stafford thoroughly, reporting all the movements of the enemy to Generals Lee and Jackson, who complimented them for their effective service. They participated in the various engagements of Stuart with Pleasanton's cavalry, and in the fight at Waynesborates. Among the bills of general importance which have been introduced by Mr. Taliaferro is one doing away with the evil of professional jurors in the various courts by allowing persons only to serve one term annually in the different courts. Another one of his bills requires county treasurers to give bonds furnished by security companies. He also is the father of a game law for the counties of Culpeper, Orange, Spotsylvania, Louisa, Stafford and King George, and of a road law for his count
Spotsylvania county (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.39
he returned to Virginia, to his old homestead in Orange county. His family residence is one of the old homesteads in this country that have been deeded from the crown by George III, and which has never passed from the possession of his family. Mr. Taliaferro never took an active part in politics until the Cleveland election in 1892. Last fall he entered into a contest with Mr. George Barbour, and during the present session he has made a very efficient and useful member of the House of Delegates. Among the bills of general importance which have been introduced by Mr. Taliaferro is one doing away with the evil of professional jurors in the various courts by allowing persons only to serve one term annually in the different courts. Another one of his bills requires county treasurers to give bonds furnished by security companies. He also is the father of a game law for the counties of Culpeper, Orange, Spotsylvania, Louisa, Stafford and King George, and of a road law for his county.
Yorktown (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.39
, Smiths, Striblings, Talliaferros, and Vapes. Other families were represented by Lawrence Ashton, William Bowen, J. E. Barbour, William Ficklin, R. A. Grey, Alexander Hunter, Robert Hart, George L. Holland, Strother Jones, T. N. Pilcher, John Robinson, James Rector, W. A. Smoot, William Spilman, W. B. Skinker, William H. Triplett, Madison Tyler, Johnsie Longue, J. W. Towson, W. N. Thorn, Melville Withers, and others. In its operations, until the army began its movement from Manassas to Yorktown, the Black Horse, being familiar with the counties of Prince William, Fauquier, and Culpeper, through which the army was about to cross, and having a complete knowledge of the roads, water-courses, and points suitable for camping, was of great value in furnishing guides, for which purpose large details were made from it. In that famous charge at the battle of Williamsburg, with all the color-bearers and buglers at the head of the columns, with not a sabre or pistol drawn in the whole reg
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.39
any point in Virginia. It so happened that some of the men had attended William and Mary College as students, and knew the roads as well as their own in Fauquier. The Black Horse took part in the raid around McClellan, simply for observation, and it is a miracle that they were not all captured. Valuable service. No historian has yet been born who could follow the Black Horse in the role it played in the seven days fight. General Lee, learning that Burnside had moved by sea from North Carolina to reinforce General Pope, as McClellan was at Fredericksburg, sent General Stuart with his brigade, of which the Black Horse formed a part, to make a reconnoisance in that direction. The Black Horse saw some very active service and gained information that proved valuable to the army. They afterwards helped to drive Pope across the Rappahannock, and now being in that part of the State in which many of them were reared, the troop was called upon to furnish guides to the different comman
Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.39
ge ubiquity and stratagem that the name of their little legion became a watchword for danger and a signal for action with the Union troops. The Black Horse was organized in 1859, just two years before the war broke out, and first figured at Harper's Ferry in the John Brown raid. Colonel John Scott, of Warrenton, Virginia, was its first captain, and gave the troop its name. Colonel Scott, who has retired from active life, was for many years a conspicuous figure in that section of the State lliam Johnson, bugler, and William E. Gaskins, quartermaster. They were subsequently incorporated into the Fourth Virginia Regiment, and permission was given to recruit it for a battalion. The first sustained march of the Black Horse was to Harper's Ferry. It afterwards advanced to Manassas and Fairfax Courthouse; its work at the battle of Bull Run was so graphically reported by the Union troops that further comment is unnecessary. The company numbered over one hundred men, and its fine appe
Savannah (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.39
venteenth Virginia Infantry and fought with them at Cold Harbor, Frazier's farm, and Malvern Hill. After the war Mr. Taliaferro went to Mississippi, where he taught school at Greenville, and from there he removed to Macon, Ga., and in 1870 to Savannah, where he conducted a private school until 1882. In October, 1881, he married a Miss Barclay, of Savannah, and upon the death of his wife in 1892 he returned to Virginia, to his old homestead in Orange county. His family residence is one of tSavannah, and upon the death of his wife in 1892 he returned to Virginia, to his old homestead in Orange county. His family residence is one of the old homesteads in this country that have been deeded from the crown by George III, and which has never passed from the possession of his family. Mr. Taliaferro never took an active part in politics until the Cleveland election in 1892. Last fall he entered into a contest with Mr. George Barbour, and during the present session he has made a very efficient and useful member of the House of Delegates. Among the bills of general importance which have been introduced by Mr. Taliaferro is one
Orange County (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.39
use during the present session. Charles C. Taliaferro. Mr. Charles C. Taliaferro, the present representative of Orange county in the House of Delegates, was born on January 26, 1842, in Martinsburg, W. Va., where his father, the Rev. Charles Ce was three years old, and he was then taken in charge by his uncle, Dr. Taliaferro, who soon afterwards removed to Orange county, Va., which county has been his home for the greater part of his life. At the breaking out of the civil war he entered a Miss Barclay, of Savannah, and upon the death of his wife in 1892 he returned to Virginia, to his old homestead in Orange county. His family residence is one of the old homesteads in this country that have been deeded from the crown by George IIer one of his bills requires county treasurers to give bonds furnished by security companies. He also is the father of a game law for the counties of Culpeper, Orange, Spotsylvania, Louisa, Stafford and King George, and of a road law for his county.
Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.39
ad attended William and Mary College as students, and knew the roads as well as their own in Fauquier. The Black Horse took part in the raid around McClellan, simply for observation, and it is a miracle that they were not all captured. Valuable service. No historian has yet been born who could follow the Black Horse in the role it played in the seven days fight. General Lee, learning that Burnside had moved by sea from North Carolina to reinforce General Pope, as McClellan was at Fredericksburg, sent General Stuart with his brigade, of which the Black Horse formed a part, to make a reconnoisance in that direction. The Black Horse saw some very active service and gained information that proved valuable to the army. They afterwards helped to drive Pope across the Rappahannock, and now being in that part of the State in which many of them were reared, the troop was called upon to furnish guides to the different commanders, and in the army's future movements upon General Pope, wa
Orange Court House (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.39
ine of the history of the famous Black Horse Troop, taken from an article written on the subject by Mr. Raphael S. Payne, is highly interesting to all who have the history of Virginia at heart, and especially in connection with the present session of the General Assembly, when it becomes known that three survivors of the gallant Black Horse are at present members of the House of Delegates, namely, Messrs. T. C. Pilcher, of Fauquier; Richard Lewis, of Culpeper, and Charles C. Talliaferro, of Orange. Mr. Pilcher, one of the five members who have been sent to the House by their constituents three times in succession, is known to every one who has ever come in contact with the General Aesembly, while he has been a member of it. His unswerving Democracy, the honesty of his sterling character, and the courage of his convictions are doubted by no one. While not blesssed with as much literary education as some of his colleagues, he is gifted with a high degree of common sense. His argume
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