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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

Found 189 total hits in 53 results.

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December 26th, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 1.58
Western campaign. [from the Richmond Dispatch, Feb. 10, 1895.] movements of the Goochland Light artillery-captain John H. Guy. A Virginian's experience, battle of February 15, 1862, and its many remarkable and exciting Incidents–Surrender of Fort Donelson. To the Editor of the Dispatch: On the 26th of December, 1861, in obedience to orders, Captain John H. Guy's Battery, the Goochland Light Artillery, left Dublin Depot, Pulaski county, Va., on the Virginia and Tennessee railroad, for General Albert Sidney Johnston's army, in Kentucky. After much delay we reached Bowling Green, January 6, 1862, and pitched our tents about two miles west of that city. General Floyd's Brigade remained in camp nearly three weeks in daily expectation of an engagement with the enemy. However, no battle came off. It was reported that General Johnston's army, in the vicinity of Bowling Green, exceeded 60,000 men. This report was without foundation, as was demonstrated by subsequent informati
January, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 1.58
on's army, in Kentucky. After much delay we reached Bowling Green, January 6, 1862, and pitched our tents about two miles west of that city. General Floyd's Brigade remained in camp nearly three weeks in daily expectation of an engagement with the enemy. However, no battle came off. It was reported that General Johnston's army, in the vicinity of Bowling Green, exceeded 60,000 men. This report was without foundation, as was demonstrated by subsequent information. The latter part of January, 1862, General Johnston's command was ordered to other sections of country; the most of his army was sent to Shiloh, Miss.; General Floyd's Brigade to Russellville, Ky. My battery encamped here about ten days. Several of us were temporarily indisposed, probably for one week, and were quartered in an old church. During the time of our indisposition, a number of ladies of this little town called on us, and were very hospitable to us. Among the number I remember the names of Mrs. Caldwell and Mr
January 6th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 1.58
y-captain John H. Guy. A Virginian's experience, battle of February 15, 1862, and its many remarkable and exciting Incidents–Surrender of Fort Donelson. To the Editor of the Dispatch: On the 26th of December, 1861, in obedience to orders, Captain John H. Guy's Battery, the Goochland Light Artillery, left Dublin Depot, Pulaski county, Va., on the Virginia and Tennessee railroad, for General Albert Sidney Johnston's army, in Kentucky. After much delay we reached Bowling Green, January 6, 1862, and pitched our tents about two miles west of that city. General Floyd's Brigade remained in camp nearly three weeks in daily expectation of an engagement with the enemy. However, no battle came off. It was reported that General Johnston's army, in the vicinity of Bowling Green, exceeded 60,000 men. This report was without foundation, as was demonstrated by subsequent information. The latter part of January, 1862, General Johnston's command was ordered to other sections of country
February 13th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 1.58
to Fort Donelson, Tennessee. My battery proceeded to Clarksville, Tennessee, from which point we could occasionally hear the reports of heavy artillery in the direction of Donelson, like muttering thunder in the distance. We remained here a day or two, and then marched to Cumberland City, a small boat-landing on the river, from where we were conveyed by a steamer to Fort Donelson, leaving all our baggage behind, which we never saw again. We reached our destination Thursday evening, February 13, 1862. Annoyed by shells. Upon our arrival at the wharf, opposite a little village, Dover, situated on a hill, interspersed with small trees and everlooking the river, about six hundred yards east of the fort, the enemy annoyed us considerably at short intervals by shelling our steamer. The quarters were made rather uncomfortable for us. Occasionally a shell would explode before reaching the wharf, in the road, or the main street that leads up into the village, which caused some excit
February 14th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 1.58
ondition of the ground. During the day several of General Forest's men, with improved firearms, came near our battery and at once communicated with those fellows, who could be seen in trees, by means of leaden messengers, informing them that the position they occupied was totally at variance with our wishes. They soon took in the situation. Some descended with involuntary celerity, while others retired more hastily than they ascended. Desperate battle. On the evening of the 14th of February, 1862, the enemy's gunboats made a desperate and powerful attack on Fort Donelson. The cannonading was terrific and incessant for several hours. Finally they were repulsed, sustaining great damage and loss of life. During the bombardment solid shot from the gunboats often passed over and beyond our troops on the right, falling between the respective armies. Early Saturday morning, February 15, 1862, General Floyd's Brigade was ordered to assault the enemy on his right line of defence
February 15th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 1.58
Western campaign. [from the Richmond Dispatch, Feb. 10, 1895.] movements of the Goochland Light artillery-captain John H. Guy. A Virginian's experience, battle of February 15, 1862, and its many remarkable and exciting Incidents–Surrender of Fort Donelson. To the Editor of the Dispatch: On the 26th of December, 1861, in obedience to orders, Captain John H. Guy's Battery, the Goochland Light Artillery, left Dublin Depot, Pulaski county, Va., on the Virginia and Tennessee railroad,nally they were repulsed, sustaining great damage and loss of life. During the bombardment solid shot from the gunboats often passed over and beyond our troops on the right, falling between the respective armies. Early Saturday morning, February 15, 1862, General Floyd's Brigade was ordered to assault the enemy on his right line of defence. This order was rather unexpected. Breakfast was being prepared at the time, and there was much confusion in camp. The battle soon began, and the ratt
February 16th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 1.58
ederals had upwards of 40,000 men on the field, while the Confederate army did not exceed 13,000 available men. This statement was made in my presence by Generals Floyd and Pillow, on the steamer from Fort Donelson, to Nashville, Tennessee, February 16, 1862. Hostilities on our left had ceased, with the exception of occasional picket-firing, but late in the evening the enemy made repeated and vigorous assaults upon the right of the Confederate line of works. The fight was a desperate one anrs, the enemy having more than three men to our one, it was deemed prudent to capitulate. Accordingly, General S. B. Buckner was selected to perform that duty, and he surrendered Fort Donelson to General U. S. Grant on the morning of the 16th of February, 1862. About 9,000 Confederates were made prisoners on that memorable occasion. It may be proper to state that early in the morning before the surrender took place a large number of our soldiers were conveyed across the river and landed on th
March, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 1.58
town, Tenn. We were pleased to meet four members of our battery, who were left in charge of these wagons. During our travel through Tennessee, the people were very hospitable to us. We marched from there to Chattanooga, and encamped about one week at the base of Lookout Mountain. We then took the cars to Knoxville, and remained here a week, and then marched across the Cumberland mountains to Morristown, Tenn., thence by rail to Virginia, and arrived in Abingdon, Va., the latter part of March, 1862. Upon our arrival in Abingdon we were much surprised on being informed that General Floyd had been relieved of his command by President Davis, and Colonel Stuart, of the Fifty-sixth Virginia Regiment, was commandant of the post. The command of General Floyd was soon ordered to the Army of Northern Virginia. Subsequently General Floyd commanded State troops in Southwest Virginia. My company having been captured at Fort Donelson, and not having any command to report to, I was tend
February 10th, 1895 AD (search for this): chapter 1.58
Western campaign. [from the Richmond Dispatch, Feb. 10, 1895.] movements of the Goochland Light artillery-captain John H. Guy. A Virginian's experience, battle of February 15, 1862, and its many remarkable and exciting Incidents–Surrender of Fort Donelson. To the Editor of the Dispatch: On the 26th of December, 1861, in obedience to orders, Captain John H. Guy's Battery, the Goochland Light Artillery, left Dublin Depot, Pulaski county, Va., on the Virginia and Tennessee railroad, for General Albert Sidney Johnston's army, in Kentucky. After much delay we reached Bowling Green, January 6, 1862, and pitched our tents about two miles west of that city. General Floyd's Brigade remained in camp nearly three weeks in daily expectation of an engagement with the enemy. However, no battle came off. It was reported that General Johnston's army, in the vicinity of Bowling Green, exceeded 60,000 men. This report was without foundation, as was demonstrated by subsequent informati
Joseph R. Anderson (search for this): chapter 1.58
then saw a steamer of considerable dimensions landing some of our troops on the Tennessee side. I was ignorant of the cause of the peculiar proceedings going on at that time. I did not understand them; but very soon I fully comprehended the true condition of affairs and gravity of the situation, especially when I saw various kinds of provisions and munitions of war being thrown into the river, and I determined not to be captured, if there was any possible means of escape. The steamer General Anderson was just returning for another load of soldiers, and my only hope of escape was on the steamer. I anxiously awaited its return, but, instead of coming near me, as I expected, it stopped about 100 yards above where I was standing. Several thousand soldiers had now congregated at the wharf, and the possibility of my escape seemed very improbable. To force my way through this immense body of men was impossible. This was a predicament, indeed, delay was dangerous. I at once resolved, i
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