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near the fort. Greek Meets Greek. I was informed that evening during the battle, that two Kentucky regiments of infantry (both Second Kentucky), one Confederate and the other Federal, charged bayonets on each other. The conflict was desperate, neither gained any decided advantage over the other, though the loss on both sides was considerable. When Greek meets Greek, then comes the tug of war. Strange as it may seem, it is said that these two regiments were commanded by brothers—Colonels Hanson. I mention the above incident because I think it worthy of remark, as similar instances were not of frequent occurrence during the late war. Capitulation. That night a council of war was held by Generals Floyd, Pillow, and Buckner. This was, indeed, a critical condition of affairs. Owing to the peculiar situation of our army and the disparity of numbers, the enemy having more than three men to our one, it was deemed prudent to capitulate. Accordingly, General S. B. Buckner was
probably involving a great sacrifice on our part. It may not be inappropriate to mention an incident which occurred about 10 o'clock that morning. Buckner rallied them. During the battle a regiment of Confederate infantry wavered, but General S. B. Buckner soon rallied them. This happened about thirty paces to the left of my battery. The general's remarks on the occasion made an impression on those who heard him, and if I remember correctly, he said, Mississippians, look at those Virginians driving the enemy from our soil. Is it possible that you are going to leave them to do the fighting? No, never; your general will lead you, and he gallantly led them into action. Not many years ago I happened to meet General Buckner at the White Sulphur Springs, W. Va., and mentioned the foregoing to him. He remembered it well. Upon being asked what regiment it was he rallied on the occasion referred to, he replied the 14th Mississippi. Regained the gun. Another incident happen
Albert Sidney Johnston (search for this): chapter 1.58
ers, Captain John H. Guy's Battery, the Goochland Light Artillery, left Dublin Depot, Pulaski county, Va., on the Virginia and Tennessee railroad, for General Albert Sidney Johnston's army, in Kentucky. After much delay we reached Bowling Green, January 6, 1862, and pitched our tents about two miles west of that city. General Floyd's Brigade remained in camp nearly three weeks in daily expectation of an engagement with the enemy. However, no battle came off. It was reported that General Johnston's army, in the vicinity of Bowling Green, exceeded 60,000 men. This report was without foundation, as was demonstrated by subsequent information. The latter part of January, 1862, General Johnston's command was ordered to other sections of country; the most of his army was sent to Shiloh, Miss.; General Floyd's Brigade to Russellville, Ky. My battery encamped here about ten days. Several of us were temporarily indisposed, probably for one week, and were quartered in an old church. Du
Charles Palmore (search for this): chapter 1.58
ade to Russellville, Ky. My battery encamped here about ten days. Several of us were temporarily indisposed, probably for one week, and were quartered in an old church. During the time of our indisposition, a number of ladies of this little town called on us, and were very hospitable to us. Among the number I remember the names of Mrs. Caldwell and Mrs. Mason, whose kind attention to us was highly appreciated. One of my battery—Jack Brooks—died here of typhoid fever, and another one—Charles Palmore—died at Bowling Green, I think, of congestion of the lungs; Captain Patterson, of the 56th Virginia Regiment, of my brigade, also died in Russellville, Ky. From Russellville, Ky., General Floyd's Brigade was sent to Fort Donelson, Tennessee. My battery proceeded to Clarksville, Tennessee, from which point we could occasionally hear the reports of heavy artillery in the direction of Donelson, like muttering thunder in the distance. We remained here a day or two, and then marched t
t Donelson. About 4 o'clock the next morning the battery was ordered on the left of the army. Owing to the proximity of the enemy this movement had to be executed with caution and as quietly as possible. Although the undertaking was one fraught with difficulty and danger, yet we succeeded in obtaining a position about the dawn of day, and hastily threw up light earthworks, which was very difficult to do in consequence of the frozen condition of the ground. During the day several of General Forest's men, with improved firearms, came near our battery and at once communicated with those fellows, who could be seen in trees, by means of leaden messengers, informing them that the position they occupied was totally at variance with our wishes. They soon took in the situation. Some descended with involuntary celerity, while others retired more hastily than they ascended. Desperate battle. On the evening of the 14th of February, 1862, the enemy's gunboats made a desperate and powe
A. M. Brooks (search for this): chapter 1.58
his army was sent to Shiloh, Miss.; General Floyd's Brigade to Russellville, Ky. My battery encamped here about ten days. Several of us were temporarily indisposed, probably for one week, and were quartered in an old church. During the time of our indisposition, a number of ladies of this little town called on us, and were very hospitable to us. Among the number I remember the names of Mrs. Caldwell and Mrs. Mason, whose kind attention to us was highly appreciated. One of my battery—Jack Brooks—died here of typhoid fever, and another one—Charles Palmore—died at Bowling Green, I think, of congestion of the lungs; Captain Patterson, of the 56th Virginia Regiment, of my brigade, also died in Russellville, Ky. From Russellville, Ky., General Floyd's Brigade was sent to Fort Donelson, Tennessee. My battery proceeded to Clarksville, Tennessee, from which point we could occasionally hear the reports of heavy artillery in the direction of Donelson, like muttering thunder in the dista
Charles R. Thomas (search for this): chapter 1.58
The steamer was soon filled to its utmost capacity. Just as the steamer moved from the landing General Floyd received information that the enemy's gunboats were in sight, coming up the river. The engineer of the steamer was ordered to put on full head of steam and proceed up the river as speedily as possible. Thus Generals Floyd and Pillow made their escape from Fort Donelson and reached Nashville the next morning. The most of the 56th Virginia Infantry came off on this steamer. Lieutenant Thomas, of Company F, later captain, now Sergeant of the Police Court, Richmond, Va., is one of the survivors of the old 56th Virginia Regiment. General Forrest, with his cavalry, succeeded in cutting their way out, and arrived at Nashville in a day or two. A member of my battery, W. M. Sharp, came off with his command. There was much interest and some excitement manifested by the people of Nashville in consequence of the fall of Fort Donelson. Hopes were entertained by many of the ci
Jefferson Davis (search for this): chapter 1.58
, the people were very hospitable to us. We marched from there to Chattanooga, and encamped about one week at the base of Lookout Mountain. We then took the cars to Knoxville, and remained here a week, and then marched across the Cumberland mountains to Morristown, Tenn., thence by rail to Virginia, and arrived in Abingdon, Va., the latter part of March, 1862. Upon our arrival in Abingdon we were much surprised on being informed that General Floyd had been relieved of his command by President Davis, and Colonel Stuart, of the Fifty-sixth Virginia Regiment, was commandant of the post. The command of General Floyd was soon ordered to the Army of Northern Virginia. Subsequently General Floyd commanded State troops in Southwest Virginia. My company having been captured at Fort Donelson, and not having any command to report to, I was tendered a position by the medical director of my brigade in his department, which I accepted, and held for some time. Finally, my company was exc
tents about two miles west of that city. General Floyd's Brigade remained in camp nearly three weost of his army was sent to Shiloh, Miss.; General Floyd's Brigade to Russellville, Ky. My battery Early Saturday morning, February 15, 1862, General Floyd's Brigade was ordered to assault the enemyrnly contested. It was the intention of General Floyd to pursue the enemy. A gun from my batter That night a council of war was held by Generals Floyd, Pillow, and Buckner. This was, indeed, ao accomplish their object. Gunboats. General Floyd stood on the deck of the steamer with his nearly one week, orders were received for General Floyd and remainder of his command to proceed towere much surprised on being informed that General Floyd had been relieved of his command by Presid commandant of the post. The command of General Floyd was soon ordered to the Army of Northern Virginia. Subsequently General Floyd commanded State troops in Southwest Virginia. My company ha[5 more...]
James M. Mason (search for this): chapter 1.58
1862, General Johnston's command was ordered to other sections of country; the most of his army was sent to Shiloh, Miss.; General Floyd's Brigade to Russellville, Ky. My battery encamped here about ten days. Several of us were temporarily indisposed, probably for one week, and were quartered in an old church. During the time of our indisposition, a number of ladies of this little town called on us, and were very hospitable to us. Among the number I remember the names of Mrs. Caldwell and Mrs. Mason, whose kind attention to us was highly appreciated. One of my battery—Jack Brooks—died here of typhoid fever, and another one—Charles Palmore—died at Bowling Green, I think, of congestion of the lungs; Captain Patterson, of the 56th Virginia Regiment, of my brigade, also died in Russellville, Ky. From Russellville, Ky., General Floyd's Brigade was sent to Fort Donelson, Tennessee. My battery proceeded to Clarksville, Tennessee, from which point we could occasionally hear the repor
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