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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.61
Evacuation Echoes. Assistant-Secretary of war Campbell's interview with Mr. Lincoln. The following letter, though it has been published several times before, will be found interesting: Richmond, Va., April 7, 1865. General Joseph R. Anderson and Others, Committee, etc.: Gentlemen—I have had, since the evacuation of Richmond, two conversations with Mr. Lincoln, President of the United States. My object was to secure for the citizens of Richmond, and the inhabitants of the State of Virginia, who had come under the military authority of the United States, as much gentleness and forbearance as could be possibly extended. The conversation had relation to the establishment of a government for Virginia, the requirement of oaths of allegiance from the citizens, and the terms of settlement with the United States, with the concurrence and sanction of General Weitzell. He assented to the application not to require oaths of allegiance from the citizens. He stated that he woul
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.61
Evacuation Echoes. Assistant-Secretary of war Campbell's interview with Mr. Lincoln. The following letter, though it has been published several times before, will be found interesting: Richmond, Va., April 7, 1865. General Joseph R. Anderson and Others, Committee, etc.: Gentlemen—I have had, since the evacuation of Richmond, two conversations with Mr. Lincoln, President of the United States. My object was to secure for the citizens of Richmond, and the inhabitants of the State of Virginia, who had come under the military authority of the United States, as much gentleness and forbearance as could be possibly extended. The conversation had relation to the establishment of a government for Virginia, the requirement of oaths of allegiance from the citizens, and the terms of settlement with the United States, with the concurrence and sanction of General Weitzell. He assented to the application not to require oaths of allegiance from the citizens. He stated that he woul
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 1.61
vacuation of Richmond, two conversations with Mr. Lincoln, President of the United States. My object was to secure for the citizens of Richmond, and the inhabitants of the State of Virginia, who had come under the military authority of the United States, as much gentleness and forbearance as could be possibly extended. The coaths of allegiance from the citizens, and the terms of settlement with the United States, with the concurrence and sanction of General Weitzell. He assented to thher they will administer the laws in connection with the authorities of the United States, and under the Constitution of the United States. I understood from Mr. pensable conditions of a settlement the restoration of the authority of the United States over the whole of the States, and the cessation of hostilities by the disbaurred in any State which would now promptly recognise the authority of the United States, and withdraw its troops; but that if the war be persisted in, that the con
Joseph R. Anderson (search for this): chapter 1.61
Evacuation Echoes. Assistant-Secretary of war Campbell's interview with Mr. Lincoln. The following letter, though it has been published several times before, will be found interesting: Richmond, Va., April 7, 1865. General Joseph R. Anderson and Others, Committee, etc.: Gentlemen—I have had, since the evacuation of Richmond, two conversations with Mr. Lincoln, President of the United States. My object was to secure for the citizens of Richmond, and the inhabitants of the State of Virginia, who had come under the military authority of the United States, as much gentleness and forbearance as could be possibly extended. The conversation had relation to the establishment of a government for Virginia, the requirement of oaths of allegiance from the citizens, and the terms of settlement with the United States, with the concurrence and sanction of General Weitzell. He assented to the application not to require oaths of allegiance from the citizens. He stated that he would
U. S. Grant (search for this): chapter 1.61
he confiscated property must be regarded as a resource, from which the expenses of the war might be supported. His memorandum contains no article upon the penalties imposed upon persons; but in his oral communications he intimated that there was scarcely any one who might not have a discharge upon the asking. I understand from the statement—though the words did not exactly imply it—that a universal amnesty would be granted if peace was concluded. In my intercourse I strongly urged the propriety of an armistice. This was done after the preparation of his memorandum. He agreed to consider the subject, but no answer has been received. I suppose that if he assents, that the matter will be decided and executed between Generals Grant and Lee. Very respectfully yours, J. A. Campbell. Assistant Secretary of War. (Under pressure from Admiral Porter and others, Mr. Lincoln was compelled almost immediately to revoke his order permitting the Legislature to assemble.—Dispa
John A. Campbell (search for this): chapter 1.61
e confiscated property must be regarded as a resource, from which the expenses of the war might be supported. His memorandum contains no article upon the penalties imposed upon persons; but in his oral communications he intimated that there was scarcely any one who might not have a discharge upon the asking. I understand from the statement—though the words did not exactly imply it—that a universal amnesty would be granted if peace was concluded. In my intercourse I strongly urged the propriety of an armistice. This was done after the preparation of his memorandum. He agreed to consider the subject, but no answer has been received. I suppose that if he assents, that the matter will be decided and executed between Generals Grant and Lee. Very respectfully yours, J. A. Campbell. Assistant Secretary of War. (Under pressure from Admiral Porter and others, Mr. Lincoln was compelled almost immediately to revoke his order permitting the Legislature to assemble.—Dispa
J. A. Campbell (search for this): chapter 1.61
Evacuation Echoes. Assistant-Secretary of war Campbell's interview with Mr. Lincoln. The following letter, though it has been published several times before, will be found interesting: Richmond, Va., April 7, 1865. General Joseph R. Anderson and Others, Committee, etc.: Gentlemen—I have had, since the evacuation of Richmond, two conversations with Mr. Lincoln, President of the United States. My object was to secure for the citizens of Richmond, and the inhabitants of the State of Virginia, who had come under the military authority of the United States, as much gentleness and forbearance as could be possibly extended. The conversation had relation to the establishment of a government for Virginia, the requirement of oaths of allegiance from the citizens, and the terms of settlement with the United States, with the concurrence and sanction of General Weitzell. He assented to the application not to require oaths of allegiance from the citizens. He stated that he woul
Fitzhugh Lee (search for this): chapter 1.61
e confiscated property must be regarded as a resource, from which the expenses of the war might be supported. His memorandum contains no article upon the penalties imposed upon persons; but in his oral communications he intimated that there was scarcely any one who might not have a discharge upon the asking. I understand from the statement—though the words did not exactly imply it—that a universal amnesty would be granted if peace was concluded. In my intercourse I strongly urged the propriety of an armistice. This was done after the preparation of his memorandum. He agreed to consider the subject, but no answer has been received. I suppose that if he assents, that the matter will be decided and executed between Generals Grant and Lee. Very respectfully yours, J. A. Campbell. Assistant Secretary of War. (Under pressure from Admiral Porter and others, Mr. Lincoln was compelled almost immediately to revoke his order permitting the Legislature to assemble.—Dispa
Fitz John Porter (search for this): chapter 1.61
he confiscated property must be regarded as a resource, from which the expenses of the war might be supported. His memorandum contains no article upon the penalties imposed upon persons; but in his oral communications he intimated that there was scarcely any one who might not have a discharge upon the asking. I understand from the statement—though the words did not exactly imply it—that a universal amnesty would be granted if peace was concluded. In my intercourse I strongly urged the propriety of an armistice. This was done after the preparation of his memorandum. He agreed to consider the subject, but no answer has been received. I suppose that if he assents, that the matter will be decided and executed between Generals Grant and Lee. Very respectfully yours, J. A. Campbell. Assistant Secretary of War. (Under pressure from Admiral Porter and others, Mr. Lincoln was compelled almost immediately to revoke his order permitting the Legislature to assemble.—Dispa
, and the terms of settlement with the United States, with the concurrence and sanction of General Weitzell. He assented to the application not to require oaths of allegiance from the citizens. He stated that he would send to General Weitzell his decision upon the question of a government of Virginia. This letter was received on Thursday, and was read by me. It authorized General Weitzell toGeneral Weitzell to grant a safe conduct to the Legislature of Virginia, to meet at Richmond to deliberate, and to return to their homes at the end of their session. I am informed by General Weitzell that he will isuGeneral Weitzell that he will isue whatever orders that may be necessary, and will furnish all the facilities of transportation, etc., to the members of the Legislature, to meet in this city; and that the Governor, Lieutenant-Governo has already operated and vested rights. I believe that full confidence may be placed in General Weitzell's fulfilment of his promise to afford facilities to the Legislature, and that its members m
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