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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Ashepoo River (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.4
entire coast line from the Ashley to the Savannah, from the opening to the close of the struggle in South Carolina. On November 7, 1861, a Federal fleet of seventeen ships and two hundred guns captured Port Royal—subsequently General T. W. Sherman took possession of its shores with a large army of occupation. From this commanding base the entire coast region of South Carolina, was from that day, possibly open to the army and navy of the United States; the Stono, North and South Edisto, Ashepoo, Combahee, Coosaw and Broad rivers and their tributaries, gave to the Federal forces short water lines to many vulnerable points in our exposed territory. It appeared at first that the undisputed control of the ocean, and access to these bold inland water ways gave to the Federal forces complete dominion in this region, the South having no ships for defensive service; yet despite these recognized advantages and our many disabilities, the enemy was kept at a safe distance all through the
Pocotaligo (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.4
rolina cavalry, with headquarters at Pocataligo, South Carolina. The old adage: It is the unexpect John's Island, near Charleston; ordered to Pocataligo to relieve Company K, ordered to Georgia; it what is now Hampton county), 80 men—were at Pocataligo and ordered to Bee's Creek on 29th; went then. Company I (Rebel Troop) was in camp at Pocataligo, but had detachments permanently assigned atn and Savannah and to Major John Jenkins, at Pocataligo. (2) To inform him by courier, of anything o Jones, at Charleston, and Major Jenkins, at Pocataligo, announcing the presence of the enemy in larnoon of the 28th, an order came to report at Pocataligo as soon as possible. The company took the rd Bachman's Battery to be ready to move from Pocataligo in quick time towards Bee's creek in case ofin Raysor states that his company, E, was at Pocataligo when word was received that the enemy were ly K, Captain Peeples, was ordered there from Pocataligo, and Company B, Captain A. L. Campbell, both[3 more...]
Annapolis (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.4
is duty was discharged that the honorable record has been indelibly made, that not a rail on our base line was ever disturbed by the enemy during four long years of frequent attempts and effective resistance. Germane to the successful defence of this coast territory, and especially to the victory of Honey Hill, the officers and men on duty may well be remarked upon here. The rapid growth of the Confederate army to large dimensions soon exhausted the roster of graduates from West Point, Annapolis, Virginia Military Institute and Citadel Academy, then the only sources from which to secure educated military men. Relative to the whole number of officers in the armies of the Confederacy these were few indeed; their influence for good was felt and recognized during the struggle, but the fact remains that our armies were, necessarily, officered by civilians. From both classes, and especially from the civilians, officers were advanced to high positions, and won great distinction in the w
Cuba, N. Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.4
ineer corps and stationed at West Point as assistant professor of engineering until September 24, 1846, when he took the field in General Scott's column in Mexico and served until May 22, 1848; he was breveted for gallantry at Cerro Gordo and for gallant conduct at Contreras and Cherubusco; was promoted captain of engineers. After the Mexican war he served on the coast defences. He resigned December 15, 1854, and with General Quitman, was engaged in preparations for a military expedition in Cuba, but this was abandoned. In 1856 he took charge of the large iron interests of Cooper, Hewitt & Co. at Trenton, N. J. When Fernando Wood was elected mayor of New York he induced General Smith to accept the position of street commissioner, which he held until May, 1861, when he and his deputy, Mansfield Lovell, of Maryland, resigned and joined the Confederate army at Richmond. President Davis commissioned him major-general on September 19, 1861, and assigned him to the command of the 1s
Chambersburg (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.4
ok the field in General Scott's column in Mexico and served until May 22, 1848; he was breveted for gallantry at Cerro Gordo and for gallant conduct at Contreras and Cherubusco; was promoted captain of engineers. After the Mexican war he served on the coast defences. He resigned December 15, 1854, and with General Quitman, was engaged in preparations for a military expedition in Cuba, but this was abandoned. In 1856 he took charge of the large iron interests of Cooper, Hewitt & Co. at Trenton, N. J. When Fernando Wood was elected mayor of New York he induced General Smith to accept the position of street commissioner, which he held until May, 1861, when he and his deputy, Mansfield Lovell, of Maryland, resigned and joined the Confederate army at Richmond. President Davis commissioned him major-general on September 19, 1861, and assigned him to the command of the 1st division, A. N. V., composed of the brigades of Whiting, Hood,, Hampton, Petigrew and Hatton. He did gallant se
Cerro Gordo (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.4
Gustavus W. Smith; 9. Mansfield Lovell; 12. Alex. P. Stewart; 16. Martin L. Smith; 17. John Pope; 24. Abner Doubleday; 28. D. H. Hill; 40. R. H. Anderson; 41. Geo. W. Lay; 48. Lafayette McLaws; 52. Earl Van Dorn; 54. James Longstreet. He was assigned to the engineer corps and stationed at West Point as assistant professor of engineering until September 24, 1846, when he took the field in General Scott's column in Mexico and served until May 22, 1848; he was breveted for gallantry at Cerro Gordo and for gallant conduct at Contreras and Cherubusco; was promoted captain of engineers. After the Mexican war he served on the coast defences. He resigned December 15, 1854, and with General Quitman, was engaged in preparations for a military expedition in Cuba, but this was abandoned. In 1856 he took charge of the large iron interests of Cooper, Hewitt & Co. at Trenton, N. J. When Fernando Wood was elected mayor of New York he induced General Smith to accept the position of street
Mackey's Point (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.4
y, third lieutenant; (from Charleston and neighboring sea islands), 20 men. Company I (Rebel Troop) was in camp at Pocataligo, but had detachments permanently assigned at different points—ten men, under Corporal J. M. Seabrook, were at headquarters, Adams Run, as guides and scouts; another detachment was on outpost duty at Port Royal Ferry and adjacent posts; only one-half of the company could be ordered to Honey Hill—about 40 men; one-half of these while on the march were ordered to Mackey's Point on news that part of the enemy's fleet was approaching there. This accounts for only twenty men being in action of 30th at Honey Hill. Company K—W. B. Peeples, captain; W. H. Hewlett, first lieutenant; Richard Johnson, second lieutenant (absent on special service); M. A. Rountree, third lieutenant (from Barnwell county); 75 men. Lieutenant Rountree states that Company K was under orders for Georgia; arrived at Grahamville evening 28th and bivouacked; hearing of landing on 29th, Capta<
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.4
After the Mexican war he served on the coast defences. He resigned December 15, 1854, and with General Quitman, was engaged in preparations for a military expedition in Cuba, but this was abandoned. In 1856 he took charge of the large iron interests of Cooper, Hewitt & Co. at Trenton, N. J. When Fernando Wood was elected mayor of New York he induced General Smith to accept the position of street commissioner, which he held until May, 1861, when he and his deputy, Mansfield Lovell, of Maryland, resigned and joined the Confederate army at Richmond. President Davis commissioned him major-general on September 19, 1861, and assigned him to the command of the 1st division, A. N. V., composed of the brigades of Whiting, Hood,, Hampton, Petigrew and Hatton. He did gallant service in the Peninsular campaign, and commanded the army at Fair Oaks for a short time, when General J. E. Johnston was wounded and carried from the field. About this time he was prostrated by a long and serio
Greenville (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.4
ry—Beaufort Volunteer Artillery, Captain H. M. Stuart; Lieutenants John Rhodes, R. M. Fuller, John Baker (from Beaufort, S. C.)—4 guns, 100 men—was at McPhersonville, north of Pocataligo Station. Furman Light Artillery (Earle's Battery), Major W. E. Earle (recently promoted and on special service); Lieutenant James Furman, commanding; Lieutenant E. H. Graham; Lieutenant S. S. Kirby (sick in hospital); Lieutenant Anderson (absent on leave); Sergeant S. B. Scruggs, acting lieutenant (from Greenville and vicinity)—4 guns, 90 men—was at May River, between Bluffton and New River Bridge; marched thirty-five miles to Honey Hill, and arrived at sunrise of the 30th. Lafayette Artillery—Captain J. T. Kanapaux; Senior First Lieutenant C. J. Zealy; Junior First Lieutenant A. Victor Kanapaux; Second Lieutenant T. W. Bolger (from Charleston)—4 guns, 135 men—at Bee's Creek field works. Bachman's Battery, A. N. V. (had been recently ordered back to the State)—Captain W. K. B
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.4
and sustainer of right, in the fields of war and journalism, and so continuously in historical research and in municipal government—give earnest of the privilege of reprinting, in these pages, the following contribution to the Sunday News, Charleston, S. C., in which it appeared November 6 and 13, 1898. Reference may be made also to another earnest contribution, published in the News, and reprinted in this volume, Charles Colcock Jones—an excellent biographical sketch. See ante, p. 32.—Ed.] ry department of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida was that day under the chief command of Lieutenant-General W. J. Hardee, with headquarters at Savannah, Georgia; Major-General Samuel Jones, second in command, had his headquarters at Charleston, South Carolina. The 3rd military district of South Carolina (extending from the Ashepoo to the Savannah river, and down to the coast), in which the enemy landed, and where the battle of Honey Hill was fought, was in command of Colonel C. J. Colcock<
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