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Providence, R. I. (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.9
s what am I to do? He kindly replied, Yes; we had no time to wait for you, but you must go with us and help to conquer Pennsylvania. He continued to speak and said: We have again out-manoeuvred the enemy, who even now don't know where we are or what are our designs. Our whole army will be in Pennsylvania the day after to-morrow, leaving the enemy far behind, and obliged to follow us by forced marches. I hope with these advantages to accomplish some signal result, and to end the war if Providence favours us. He then alluded to the conduct of our army in Pennsylvania, said he had received letters from many prominent men in the South urging retaliatory acts while in the enemy's country, on property, &c., for ravages and destruction on Southern homes. He said: What do you think should be our treatment of people in Pennsylvania? I replied General, I have never thought a wanton destruction of property of non-combatants in an enemy's country advanced any cause. That our aims were h
Seminary Ridge (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.9
s formed on the north of the road, and under my guidance reached unmolested by rapid advance a point commanding the town, which is the northern termination of Seminary Ridge and about a mile distant from Gettysburg. A half hour before reaching this position, we had heard Hill's artillery actively engaged off to our right and in advance, which proved to be his first encounter with the enemy unexpectedly on Seminary Ridge, one and a half miles west of Gettysburg; the position gained by us was on the enemy's right flank as he engaged General Hill and directly west of the town. Rodes at once engaged with his infantry on our right, and his batteries opened ar Trimble—all concentrated on the enemy's left centre. Longstreet's two right divisions were not put in earnestly. Two divisions of Hill were in position on Seminary Ridge, and Ewell's Corps on left, held in threatening attitude. It was evident that in General Lee's position, distant from his supplies and from all reinforceme
York, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.9
chieve the recognition of our independence. He concluded by saying General Ewell's forces are by this time in Harrisburg; if not, go and join him, and help to take the place. June 28th, Sunday.—Reached Carlisle. General Early had been sent to York, but no force against Harrisburg. Told General Ewell it could easily be taken, and I thought General Lee expected it. I volunteered to capture the place with one brigade, and it was arranged we should start before day Tuesday morning. That night,cumstances. These were the words. Tuesday, June 30th.—Ewell started from Carlisle with Rodes' Division, and by an easy march reached Heidleburg before sundown. General Johnson was left to guard trains, and General Early had not returned from York. After dark General Early reached Heidleburg, having left his division in camp three miles off. General Ewell called a consultation, Early, Rodes and self present. General Ewell stated that information had come of the arrival of the 11th co
Shocco Springs (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.9
down to privates, carefully recorded and preserved, how precious and invaluable would they be to the future historian. What would the history of our Revolutionary war have been without the aid of Thatcher's Journal, a plain, unpretending private narrative of events, noted down at the time they occurred. This journal helped to clear up many doubtful points, and to fix indisputably many important facts, in the history of the Revolution. Narrative. May 18, 1863. Left Richmond from Shocco Springs, N. C., to hasten recovery from a wounded leg and a desperate attack of camp erysipelas. June 18th. Feeling sufficiently restored to return to duty, I wrote to General Lee with the freedom of an old acquaintance, requesting to be placed on service with him in the Army of Northern Virginia. In reply General Lee said in his letter: I have other and more agreeable service for you. I wish you to take command in the Valley of Virginia and of all the troops now in it, your headquarters at
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.9
ception of General Lee's design in entering Pennsylvania, and correct apprehension of the causes whipposed that he could take a large army into Pennsylvania and continue there many weeks without fightbut you must go with us and help to conquer Pennsylvania. He continued to speak and said: We have aare our designs. Our whole army will be in Pennsylvania the day after to-morrow, leaving the enemy then alluded to the conduct of our army in Pennsylvania, said he had received letters from many pro think should be our treatment of people in Pennsylvania? I replied General, I have never thought as. I shall, therefore, carry on the war in Pennsylvania without offending the sanction of a high ciwhere he was seated, and unfolding a map of Pennsylvania, asked me about the topography of the counte and much demoralized, when they come into Pennsylvania. I shall throw an overwhelming force on the hoped and believed, a successful battle in Pennsylvania would have secured Southern independence.
Chambersburg, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.9
beamed from his countenance. General Lee did not finally conquer by arms in the just cause which he espoused; but his more glorious victories in favour of mercy and justice, over mad ambition, lust, rapine and wrong, lift his character to a sublimer height than any ever attained by a military chieftain. Already the verdict of the world has pronounced him the hero of humanity. Yes comrades, He was not only famous, but of that good fame, without which Glory's but a tavern song. Chambersburg, June 271h, 1863. The commanding general has observed with marked satisfaction the conduct of the troops on the march, and confidently anticipates results commensurate with the high spirit they have manifested. No troops could have displayed greater fortitude, or better performed the arduous duties of the past ten days. Their conduct in other respects has, with few exceptions, been in keeping with their character as soldiers, and entitles them to approbation and praise. There have, h
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.9
The Battle and campaign of Gettysburg. From the original Ms. Furnished by Major Graham Daves, of North Carolina. By Major-General Isaac R. Trimble, C. S. A. [The Battle of Gettysburg is of trite discussion—nevertheless this paper, in its perspicuous candor and fidelity, has its value. It was, as Major Daves, (a student and valiant veteran, with due share of reverence, as his connection with the Roanoke Island Memorial Association may attest), states, originally written for one of the engineer, and was familiar with all the region about Gettysburg, and as is well known in the third day's fight at Gettysburg, he commanded Lane's and Scale's brigades, of Pender's division (Pender had been mortally wounded), both brigades of North Carolina.] Much has been said and written about the Battle of Gettysburg, but many errors are yet entertained concerning it. Many of the transactions of that great event are either unknown, misrepresented, or put down at a wrong hour—and as yet hav
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.9
the valley and repair to Staunton. On reaching that place the 22nd, on horseback, I found that all the forces in the valley had moved, or were under orders for Maryland. I continued down the valley to overtake General Lee and report to him, which I did the afternoon of the 24th June, near Berryville. As soon as the courtesies est and bring to summary punishment all who shall, in any way, offend against the orders of this subject. R. E. Lee, General. June 26th. General Lee entered Maryland. I met him in Hagerstown and suggested sending at once a brigade to Baltimore to take that city, rouse Maryland, and thus embarrass the enemy. He so far considMaryland, and thus embarrass the enemy. He so far considered the plan as to write to General A. P. Hill, the only corps commander near, to ask if he could spare a brigade for that purpose, who told me he had sent a reply to General Lee, that it would reduce his force too much, so it was not done. June 27th. In the afternoon I met General Lee again at his tent pitched near the road
Cashtown (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.9
eived by courier from General Lee a despatch that the enemy had crossed the Potomac—26th and 27th—with an order to cross at once the South Mountain, and march to Cashtown or Gettysburg, according to circumstances. These were the words. Tuesday, June 30th.—Ewell started from Carlisle with Rodes' Division, and by an easy march o under his order, which was read over repeatedly and variously commented on, General E. especially commenting in severe terms on its ambiguity with reference to Cashtown or Gettysburg as the objective point. When my opinion was asked, I said I could interpret it in but one way, after hearing from General Lee a few days before hicided that night. About seven or eight next morning, July 1st, begun the march towards Middletown, as I suggested that place to be indirectly on the way to both Cashtown and Gettysburg, and that a courier should be sent to General Lee for positive orders. We reached Middletown, seven miles from Gettysburg, about 10 o'clock, and <
Hagerstown (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.9
inst Him to whom vengeance belongeth, and without whose favor and support, our efforts must all prove in vain. The commanding general, therefore, earnestly exhorts the troops to abstain with most scrupulous care from unnecessary or wanton injury to private property; and he enjoins upon all officers to arrest and bring to summary punishment all who shall, in any way, offend against the orders of this subject. R. E. Lee, General. June 26th. General Lee entered Maryland. I met him in Hagerstown and suggested sending at once a brigade to Baltimore to take that city, rouse Maryland, and thus embarrass the enemy. He so far considered the plan as to write to General A. P. Hill, the only corps commander near, to ask if he could spare a brigade for that purpose, who told me he had sent a reply to General Lee, that it would reduce his force too much, so it was not done. June 27th. In the afternoon I met General Lee again at his tent pitched near the road, for a night halt. He cal
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