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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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F. M. Conner (search for this): chapter 1.1
Friday evening Rosser whipped the enemy's cavalry, capturing some wagons and forges. Saturday remained here in camp. Yesterday morning rode over with Estill to Conner's South Carolina brigade to hear Dubose preach, and sat awhile afterwards. Rode to division Headquarters and then back to camp, hearing soon after of the stampedet. Wednesday troops moved down near Woodstock and ordnance trains camped near Mt. Jackson. Thursday troops moved on down to Fisher's Hill and beyond Strasburg, Conner's brigade engaging two brigades of enemy and driving them across Cedar Creek, General Conner being wounded. About 1 P. M. that day, I left camp near Mt. Jackson General Conner being wounded. About 1 P. M. that day, I left camp near Mt. Jackson and rode to Q. M. train, staying with Major Tanner that night. Yesterday morning joined division in line of battle about a mile and a half from here, and remained there all day, the enemy not advancing. Camped at old Headquarters last night. This morning have just received orders to go back to position occupied yesterday, the
ust moving. Shortly after return to camp received orders to move, and travelled till 9 P. M., camping here near Harrisonburg, enemy having moved on down the Valley. Everything on the move this morning. Glad of it. On to Winchester again. Only hope we will whip the Yankees and get there. Camp near New Market, 1/2 mile distant, Monday, October 10th, 1864. On Friday troops moved to this point, but ordnance trains stopped at Lacy's Spring. I rode with troops, conversing with Dubose, Henry Noel, and others. Stayed at division Headquarters that night, and next morning rode over here, train having moved down. Friday evening Rosser whipped the enemy's cavalry, capturing some wagons and forges. Saturday remained here in camp. Yesterday morning rode over with Estill to Conner's South Carolina brigade to hear Dubose preach, and sat awhile afterwards. Rode to division Headquarters and then back to camp, hearing soon after of the stampede of our cavalry below Woodstock. It seems ou
, and Friday went down to the troops, having heard they had moved the day before from Charlestown towards Shepherdstown. Met the troops returning that evening at Leetown, where we camped for the night. Next morning the troops moved back to Bunker Hill. Spent the night at Bunker Hill, and rode up to camp, and to church in Winchester next morning. Spent Monday and yesterday in camp. Friday, September 2, 1864. Spent day before yesterday in camp. Went to W. yesterday morning and saw Joe Irving off for Staunton, severely, though not dangerously, wounded; the poor fellow was in very bad spirits. Went to see Arrington, General Rodes' Aid, who is badly wounded, and found him doing very well. Will ride to W. and then to Bunker Hill. Sunday, September 4, 1864. 1/2 miles from Berryville. On 2d, went to the troops, striking the main column marching from Bunker Hill across. Learnt our division had kept up the pike, so had to ride over to it, and got there an hour or two after th
William H. Payne (search for this): chapter 1.1
the troops moved down the Valley, and on Saturday I started down also (our ordnance trains remaining here), with some slight anticipations of getting to W. again. On reaching Fisher's Hill, met the trains returning, troops following and camping that night in old camps at Fisher's Hill. General Early went between Middletown and Newtown and found all the enemy's force still between that point and Winchester. Our cavalry on back road had a fight, in which Rosser's brigade was driven back, but Payne, coming over, drove back the Yankees in utter confusion. Lieutenant-Colonel Tom Marshall, of the 7th [Va.], was killed, another heavy blow to the Barton family. McCausland's brigade, on Front Royal road, was driven back to the Shenandoah, losing some wagons and two pieces of artillery. When will we cease supplying the Yankees with artillery? Sunday the army continued its march back, reaching their old camp near here on Monday. Hope we will now go back and go into winter-quarters. Cam
Randolph Hutchinson (search for this): chapter 1.1
y-three pieces of artillery, thirty or forty wagons, and forty or fifty ambulances. It was impossible to rally a handful of men to stop the Yankee cavalry. This is the worst stampede yet, and the harder to bear after our victory of the morning. If old Jubal had only pressed on, I firmly believe, from all I have heard, that we could have driven them beyond Winchester. General Ramseur, commanding our division, was wounded, and his ambulance captured; we learn that he has since died. Ran. Hutchinson, of our staff, is missing, supposed to be captured. I was not present at the fight, or the stampede, our ordnance trains being ordered down after the success of the morning, starting from Mt. Jackson about 5 1/2 P. M,, but before getting to Woodstock, about 10 1/2 P. M., we were ordered back and kept on to Rude's Hill, the quartermaster train following soon after. Estill and I stayed at Edinburg that night and joined our divisions next morning as they passed through. The troops came
Hugh Nelson (search for this): chapter 1.1
[Captain of a battery] was struck with a piece of shell, cutting the femoral artery, and he died that night. He was a fine fellow, beloved of his company and all who knew him. About dark I started for the wagon train, some six or seven miles distant. I did not have long to rest after reaching there, for about 2 A. M. we started and marched continuously, crossing the mountain and reaching here about 3 o'clock yesterday evening. I rode along, partly with Eugene Blackford and partly with Colonel Nelson (who informed me of LIV.'s death), and overtook my train while coming down the side of the mountain. Got my dinner (or supper), having eaten nothing but green apples since the night before, and retired very early. This morning drew arms and accoutrements and issued them to the brigade ordnance officers. The troops are over the other side of the mountain. I learn that Kershaw's division arrived to-day, and whipped the Yankee cavalry, who endeavored to attack his train. Camp near Wa
Eugene Blackford (search for this): chapter 1.1
s artillery firing, LIV. Massie [Captain of a battery] was struck with a piece of shell, cutting the femoral artery, and he died that night. He was a fine fellow, beloved of his company and all who knew him. About dark I started for the wagon train, some six or seven miles distant. I did not have long to rest after reaching there, for about 2 A. M. we started and marched continuously, crossing the mountain and reaching here about 3 o'clock yesterday evening. I rode along, partly with Eugene Blackford and partly with Colonel Nelson (who informed me of LIV.'s death), and overtook my train while coming down the side of the mountain. Got my dinner (or supper), having eaten nothing but green apples since the night before, and retired very early. This morning drew arms and accoutrements and issued them to the brigade ordnance officers. The troops are over the other side of the mountain. I learn that Kershaw's division arrived to-day, and whipped the Yankee cavalry, who endeavored to a
G. W. Wilkins (search for this): chapter 1.1
om Rev. Dr. Lacy. I wish it could be published in tract form and distributed throughout the army. Old Jubal was at church to-day. On Friday, 18th, sent Lee and Wilkins with wagon to Culpeper after arms. Wilkins and wagon returned day before yesterday with only 20 arms, a complete failure; Lee went on to Loudoun. Saturday, 19thWilkins and wagon returned day before yesterday with only 20 arms, a complete failure; Lee went on to Loudoun. Saturday, 19th, had meeting of our Board, and again on Monday, 21st, on which day Estill and I were appointed Committee to draw up the instructions, and all the papers were committed to me—convenient way to put off all the work on two. Tuesday, 22d, our trains moved back up the Valley, and I went down with troops to Rude's Hill after Yankee me day, but was left, and got back Sunday. Spent Monday in camp and worked on papers committed to me by Board. Yesterday sent wagon with ammunition to troops by Wilkins; went into Staunton and paid the dentist a visit. Must get to work on papers now. This concludes this rambling Diary, which has been of some interest to me, e
's division formed and went in to the left of Ramseur's, and ours (three brigades) between the two; being very effective, doing good execution. Ramseur was pressed back on the right, but succeeded enced. Wharton's division had barely reached Ramseur's line when a heavy force of Yankee cavalry I suppose, about 1,000 men all together. General Ramseur has been assigned to the command of the das on extreme left of our division, where General Ramseur had his Headquarters—from two directions,ral Lomax, who commanded the cavalry, and General Ramseur, considered that, if an attack was made a two regiments of Battle's brigade, under General Ramseur himself, and that started the demoralizedhole division. In evening rode over to General Ramseur's Headquarters and spent a short while. day visited brigade ordnance officers and General Ramseur's Headquarters. Tried to get some govern playing a dirge for Major-Generals Rodes and Ramseur. Tuesday was observed in our division in memor[4 more...]
iary of Captain James M. Garnett, ordnance officer Rodes's division, 2d corps, army of Northern Virester towards Strasburg, and remained with General Rodes that day and next morning, thinking there the town about 8 in the evening. Stayed at General Rodes' Headquarters at Kernstown that night, and very bad spirits. Went to see Arrington, General Rodes' Aid, who is badly wounded, and found him is morning trains moved to W. and I joined General Rodes, who moved across to the Berryville pike, nt to see brigade ordnance officers and to General Rodes' Headquarters. Soon after reaching there,llen's and to Archer's train. Am going to General Rodes' Headquarters, division being under ordersaged, in obedience to previous orders from General Rodes, I immediately went after the brigade ordnnces three deep. I met the ambulance with General Rodes' body, in charge of Captain Randolph, and Grimes's. When General Ramseur alluded to General Rodes, in speaking to Battle's brigade, I could [10 more...]
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