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Spottsylvania (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.3
rederick county, Maryland. It is understood that his health has become greatly impaired. General Sedgwick's sudden taking off. It is a fact worthy of being noted that Corporal Mauk was an eye witness to the killing of General Sedgwick, commander of the Sixth army corps, whose taking off was as sudden, as unexpected, and almost as tragic as that of General A. P. Hill. The Sixth corps had made a long march on the 8th of May, 1864, and on the 9th was getting into position in front of Spotsylvania. No general engagement was expected for some hours, and Sedgwick and several officers of his staff were leisurely inspecting the lines, walking from one point to another, and stopping occasionally to speak encouraging words to the men. The Confederate line was apparently a mile away, but every now and then the whirr of a minie ball showed that the sharpshooters were plying their deadly work from such vantage points as the natural features of the battle ground afforded. Sedgwick had been
Bedford County (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.3
rom Washington, the village workshops as well as the farms yielded their quota. Mauk grew up in a little valley in Bedford county, not far from the town of Bedford. A high mountain overshadowed his home on either side. With the exception of his Bedford. A high mountain overshadowed his home on either side. With the exception of his three years service in the Union army, his whole life was spent in the same neighborhood. He died in the village of Centreville, midway between the city of Cumberland, on the Potomac, and the town of Bedford, on the headwaters of the Juniata. WhenBedford, on the headwaters of the Juniata. When a boy, he picked up the rudimentary education which most lads, in his condition of life, obtained in the log school-house, and his ambition never reached beyond the simple employments which required no large stock of school-book learning. Neverthving. He belongs to the class of honest toilers, of whom Mauk was an excellent type. He has spent his whole life in Bedford county, Penna., near to the spot where he was born. The tremendous events through which he passed in his youth, made no app
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.3
General A. P. Hill, and during the remainder of his service he was one of that able officer's confidential messengers, and was often entrusted with special duty regarded as particularly delicate and dangerous. At the close of the war Tucker returned to Baltimore and for a number of years was a salesman for the large wholesale house of William T. Walters & Co. Of late years he has resided, for the most part, in New Jersey and Pennsylvania. At present he is living in the little village of Pearl, Frederick county, Maryland. It is understood that his health has become greatly impaired. General Sedgwick's sudden taking off. It is a fact worthy of being noted that Corporal Mauk was an eye witness to the killing of General Sedgwick, commander of the Sixth army corps, whose taking off was as sudden, as unexpected, and almost as tragic as that of General A. P. Hill. The Sixth corps had made a long march on the 8th of May, 1864, and on the 9th was getting into position in front of
Appomattox (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.3
obtained of Sergeant Mauk the statement which is here included. The paper has been furnished through one who saw some arduous service under General Hill, and as Captain in Dibrell's Cavalry accompanied President Davis after the surrender at Appomattox in his flight beyond Charlotte, N. C.; who has served since as Lieutenant-Colonel of Artillery in the Maryland Line, and is now First Lieutenant-Commander of Isaac R. Trimble Camp, Confederate Veterans, and the member from Maryland of the Histoof the embattled line, had entered upon the final struggle. A portion of General Lee's forces held the cordon of strong forts which had been thrown around Petersburg, forming as it were a gigantic horse-shoe, with the corkers resting on the Appomatox river and covering the roads to Richmond. Grant's guns had been pounding away at the toe of the horseshoe for nine months, with no appreciable effect. The Southside Railroad runs westward from Petersburg and connects with the Richmond and Danv
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.3
saw some arduous service under General Hill, and as Captain in Dibrell's Cavalry accompanied President Davis after the surrender at Appomattox in his flight beyond Charlotte, N. C.; who has served since as Lieutenant-Colonel of Artillery in the Maryland Line, and is now First Lieutenant-Commander of Isaac R. Trimble Camp, Confederate Veterans, and the member from Maryland of the History Committee of the United Confederate Veterans. Colonel Peters, as he is popularly designated, has enthusiastiMaryland of the History Committee of the United Confederate Veterans. Colonel Peters, as he is popularly designated, has enthusiastically exemplified his devotion to the memory of our momentous Southern struggle. His untiring efforts have been attended with material results in the provision for the maimed and needy veterans and for kindred sacred objects. Acknowledgment is due, also, to a distinguished officer of General Hill's staff for revision of the account of the circumstances attending his death. It has been deemed that it would be acceptable to prefix to the paper a portrait of General Hill and a synopsis of hi
New Jersey (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.3
at headquarters. Several acts of personal bravery attracted the attention of General A. P. Hill, and during the remainder of his service he was one of that able officer's confidential messengers, and was often entrusted with special duty regarded as particularly delicate and dangerous. At the close of the war Tucker returned to Baltimore and for a number of years was a salesman for the large wholesale house of William T. Walters & Co. Of late years he has resided, for the most part, in New Jersey and Pennsylvania. At present he is living in the little village of Pearl, Frederick county, Maryland. It is understood that his health has become greatly impaired. General Sedgwick's sudden taking off. It is a fact worthy of being noted that Corporal Mauk was an eye witness to the killing of General Sedgwick, commander of the Sixth army corps, whose taking off was as sudden, as unexpected, and almost as tragic as that of General A. P. Hill. The Sixth corps had made a long march on
Fort Bedford (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.3
Matthews, late of the Pension Bureau, for the Baltimore American, and published in its issue of May 30, 1892, as a preliminary to the report of the proceedings in connection with the unveiling of the statue to the memory of the heroic Hill at Richmond, Va., on the same day. The original article has been further revised and amended to make it conform to events which have occurred since and information which has been further elicited. While investigating pension claims in the vicinity of Bedford, Pa., Mr. Matthews obtained of Sergeant Mauk the statement which is here included. The paper has been furnished through one who saw some arduous service under General Hill, and as Captain in Dibrell's Cavalry accompanied President Davis after the surrender at Appomattox in his flight beyond Charlotte, N. C.; who has served since as Lieutenant-Colonel of Artillery in the Maryland Line, and is now First Lieutenant-Commander of Isaac R. Trimble Camp, Confederate Veterans, and the member from M
Charlotte (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.3
further revised and amended to make it conform to events which have occurred since and information which has been further elicited. While investigating pension claims in the vicinity of Bedford, Pa., Mr. Matthews obtained of Sergeant Mauk the statement which is here included. The paper has been furnished through one who saw some arduous service under General Hill, and as Captain in Dibrell's Cavalry accompanied President Davis after the surrender at Appomattox in his flight beyond Charlotte, N. C.; who has served since as Lieutenant-Colonel of Artillery in the Maryland Line, and is now First Lieutenant-Commander of Isaac R. Trimble Camp, Confederate Veterans, and the member from Maryland of the History Committee of the United Confederate Veterans. Colonel Peters, as he is popularly designated, has enthusiastically exemplified his devotion to the memory of our momentous Southern struggle. His untiring efforts have been attended with material results in the provision for the ma
Centreville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.3
ach company as could be found in the communities from which they came. When the successive calls for troops were promulgated from Washington, the village workshops as well as the farms yielded their quota. Mauk grew up in a little valley in Bedford county, not far from the town of Bedford. A high mountain overshadowed his home on either side. With the exception of his three years service in the Union army, his whole life was spent in the same neighborhood. He died in the village of Centreville, midway between the city of Cumberland, on the Potomac, and the town of Bedford, on the headwaters of the Juniata. When a boy, he picked up the rudimentary education which most lads, in his condition of life, obtained in the log school-house, and his ambition never reached beyond the simple employments which required no large stock of school-book learning. Nevertheless, he was a man of excellent sense, had an intelligent conception of the great Civil War, its causes and results, and co
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.3
conscious of the other's existence. It is a somewhat remarkable circumstance that the survivors were all citizens of Pennsylvania in 1892. The Southern soldier who lived to tell the tragic story of the death of his chief and his own fortunate escacircumstances that brought General Hill and Sergeant Tucker, his chief of couriers, into accidental collision with two Pennsylvania soldiers, it will be necessary to take a glance at the military situation as it existed on that eventful morning. Thethe railroad and a wagon road, running parallel with each other. Comrade Daniel Wolford and myself, of company F, 138 Pennsylvania infantry, reached this point. We came to a saw-mill, just across the railroad, close to it under a slab pile near thee large wholesale house of William T. Walters & Co. Of late years he has resided, for the most part, in New Jersey and Pennsylvania. At present he is living in the little village of Pearl, Frederick county, Maryland. It is understood that his healt
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