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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Scottsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.4
ral Edward Johnson, cut off at the Bloody Angle, and furnished the principal part of the six hundred officers—the martyrs of Morris's Island and Fort Pulaski-many of them food for the sharks of Charleston harbor or their bodies decaying amid the boggy marshes round Fort Pulaski. At the former places—held by negro troops, late slaves—their ration was two ounces of bread, washed down with a pint of Cayenne pepper tea. Captain James M. Hughes, Company K, 44th Virginia, who resides near Scottsville, Va., says he owes his life to a negro—Corporal Triner—who, taking a fancy to him, daily brought him battercakes, hid beneath his shirt bosom. His brother, Lieutenant John Hughes, less fortunate, and many others, were reduced to skeletons, under the agony of starvation from a stimulated appetite goaded by the beverage given. The few who at last, in the very jaws of death, returned home were walking skeletons, whom even their friends failed to recognize. If any one desires to hear the t
Cayenne (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.4
cavalry—present in every fight up to his lamented death. They formed part of the force of General Edward Johnson, cut off at the Bloody Angle, and furnished the principal part of the six hundred officers—the martyrs of Morris's Island and Fort Pulaski-many of them food for the sharks of Charleston harbor or their bodies decaying amid the boggy marshes round Fort Pulaski. At the former places—held by negro troops, late slaves—their ration was two ounces of bread, washed down with a pint of Cayenne pepper tea. Captain James M. Hughes, Company K, 44th Virginia, who resides near Scottsville, Va., says he owes his life to a negro—Corporal Triner—who, taking a fancy to him, daily brought him battercakes, hid beneath his shirt bosom. His brother, Lieutenant John Hughes, less fortunate, and many others, were reduced to skeletons, under the agony of starvation from a stimulated appetite goaded by the beverage given. The few who at last, in the very jaws of death, returned home were
Louisa, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.4
miles beyond Beverley, General Garnett faced McClellan's 15,000 with 2,000 men, composed of Colonel William C. Taliaferro's brigade, the Thirty-first Virginia (West Virginia), under Colonel Jackson, and the First Georgia, under Colonel Ramsey. Thus Garnett was attempting to hold four detached positions against McClellan's united force of over three to one. On the night of the 10th your correspondent was thrown out at the extreme picket on Rich mountain, with orders from Captain Shelton, of Louisa, officer of the day, to scout out if anything unusual occurred, and find out its nature and report to him on rounds to the posts. About midnight a movement of the enemy was discovered opening and cutting a way 'round Pegram's position in the direction of the entrenched position held by the College Boys. This was duly reported and a courier sent to General Garnett. At daylight of July 11h an order came to Scott to immediately join Garnett at Laurel Hill. When within three miles of that po
Cheat Mountain (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.4
rning of the 12th of July, then rejoining the regiment late in the evening of that charge at Cheat mountain. It is evident that, as the turnpike road was open for the Yankee cavalry, it was equally open for Garnett to have joined Scott at Beverley, and retreat that way to Cheat mountain and entrench there, as the enemy did afterwards. At Travellers' Rest, on Greenbrier river, near dark of the er's Rest, on the Greenbrier, to hold the Parkersburg turnpike, and prevent any advance from Cheat mountain on Staunton, General Henry R. Jackson, of Georgia, being in command. We had been reinforcedment to say, They were as immobile under fire as a parcel of tarrapins on a sandbar. At Cheat mountain. Soon after this General Robert E. Lee, then in command in West Virginia, when he planned an attack on Cheat mountain from the west, called for 2,500 volunteers from this force to storm the entrenchments from the east. He got them, and they marched to position at midnight, awaiting all d
Antioch (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.4
m crossing to attack the entrenchments, the battle culminated into an artillery duel of three hours duration, when the enemy fell back. During this artillery duel the writer witnessed as cool a piece of daring as he saw but once after during the war. He was lying down in his place in the trench at the extreme point, near the enemy's battery and directly beneath our own, in line of the direct fire. The next man to to the left of him was private Robert Blackburn, the present postmaster of Antioch, Va., who was sitting up, a twelve pound shell fell in the trench between us, its firing, hissing fuse rapidly burning, predicating death or wounds to all in that part of the trench. There was no time for me to rise and throw it out, so I exclaimed, as it fell: Throw her out, Bob. Instantly he seized it and hurled it over the bank of trench, and it scarcely rolled twenty feet before it exploded. Here was a fair specimen of our demoralization, so curtly mentioned in Mrs. Lee's history. Inde
Monterey (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.4
These men were totally demoralized. On the evening of the 13th we rested for the night, and on the 14th of July reached Monterey and encamped, awaiting Garnett's forces to join us. Pegram, cut off by this mismanagement, was compelled to surrender ty the General's horse. The body was recovered by McClellan and sent home by way of Washington for burial. Retreat to Monterey. On the fall of Garnett, Colonel Taliaferro assumed command, and speedily checked the enemy's advance, and his force safely reached Monterey a few days after. The entire force were detained a month at this place by measles of a virulent type which deciminated our ranks. On the 15th of August we advanced to Traveller's Rest, on the Greenbrier, to hold the Parkersbs of darkness the night following the battle through a trackless wilderness; how we tramped through mud and rain down to Monterey; how men fell by the way from hunger; how wounded comrades were set up against trees and given the farewell hand of fel
Lewis County (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.4
r. Here Garnett concluded to make a stand to check the enemy's advance. A line of battle was formed of Taliaferro's regiment and the 1st Georgia, with the 31st Virginia (West Virginia) thrown out as a skirmish line and sharpshooters along the banks of the river. General Garnett rode up to Lieutenant-Colonel Pat Duffy, of Braxton Courthouse, in charge of the skirmish line, and called for twelve men. On reaching the stream he ordered eleven back, and himself and one man, Zack Tillman, of Lewis county, continued to the middle of the river. Here Garnett ordered ten men back, who, thinking the General demented, hesitated. A volley from the enemy riddled Garnett's body. It fell into the stream. Tillman brought out safely the General's horse. The body was recovered by McClellan and sent home by way of Washington for burial. Retreat to Monterey. On the fall of Garnett, Colonel Taliaferro assumed command, and speedily checked the enemy's advance, and his force safely reached Monte
Rich Mountain (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.4
Rich mountain in 1861. [from the Richmond Dispatch of November 17 and December 3, 1899.] An ant was thrown out at the extreme picket on Rich mountain, with orders from Captain Shelton, of Louih double quick to the forks of the road on Rich mountain, some half a mile from the entrenched Collly, to direct stragglers from the fight on Rich mountain on the line of retreat. This he did, remaof July 10, 11, and 12, 1861, at and about Rich mountain, the scene of the second battle of the latral Pegram was entrenched on the summit of Rich mountain, with 300 men, known as the College Boys, al Garnett was in command. When we got to Rich mountain there were a few troops there-how many I d and the few troops there before we got to Rich mountain were engaged in felling trees and making an ordered back to the forks of the road on Rich mountain, some half mile from the entrenched Collegission of the Dispatch, I will say more of Rich mountain and its consequences. C. T. Allen, Former[4 more...]
Huttonsville (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.4
four times thereafter. On that day, wrought to reckless frenzy, we might have been annihilated, but never defeated! Garnett's last order. Almost with the close of the fight, an order came from General Garnett for Scott to fall back to Huttonsville, twelve miles from Beverley, and he would join us there, concentrate, and give McClellan battle. We had nearly reached Huttonsville, when there came another order from Garnett for us to return to Beverley, where he would join us, and fight thHuttonsville, when there came another order from Garnett for us to return to Beverley, where he would join us, and fight there next day. Midnight of the 11th of July found us, after marching and countermarching all day, drawn up in the streets of Beverley, waiting Garnett, our last march made amid a thunder-storm and downpour of rain seldom witnessed. As we stood in rank, wet to the skin, there came a last order from Garnett to take the prisoners from the jail and fall rapidly back to Monterey, where he would join us by way of Hardy and the South Branch of the Potomac. This was done, Colonel Scott ordering your co
Mexico, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.4
a diabolical cruelty without parallel, even in the world's darkest pages, let them call upon Captain James M. Hughes, as brave and true a soldier as marched to the tune of Dixie beneath the Stars and Bars, and as the unbidden ear of memory rises in his fearless eye, he will a tale unfold that will damn the authors of this diabolical scheme and consign them to eternal obliquity of the blackest pages of the world's eternal history. Corrections and further particulars by C. T. Allen. Mexico, Mo., November 25, 1899. To the Editor of the Dispatch: In your weekly issue of November 21st I have read with pleasing interest an article by Dr. Henry M. Price, late of the 44th Virginia Volunteers, touching the incidents and occurrences of July 10, 11, and 12, 1861, at and about Rich mountain, the scene of the second battle of the late war—the first being the battle of Big Bethel, on June 10th. I remember with remarkable distinctness many occurrences of that time, and I recall this
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