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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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June 24th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 1.9
effective, nor the ammunition as good as that of McClellan, still there was no hesitancy on the part of General Lee in attacking McClellan and his army. Our battery (Marmaduke Johnson's) had for some weeks been camped in the field between Colonel John B. Young's house, afterwards purchased by Mr. Ginter, and Emmanuel Church. On the Brook Road, near the Yellow Tavern, was the Hanover troops acting as pickets; between us and Richmond, Branch's Brigade of North Carolinians. On the 24th of June, 1862, in the afternoon, orders were issued for us to move out the Brook Turnpike, and in a very short while, with the cavalry in front, our battery in the centre and Branch's Brigade in the rear, we were swinging down the road towards the northwest. As we passed the gate of Mr. Stewart's beautiful place several of the ladies of the family were gathered to watch the troops go by. I stopped and requested that they would send word to my father that our battery had been ordered off, we knew n
July 1st, 1900 AD (search for this): chapter 1.9
How the Seven days battle around Richmond began. [from the Richmond, Va., Times, July 1, 1900.] The dash and romance of war is supposed to surround the cavalry branch of the service, but at times the red artillery comes in for its share, as was the case in the opening of the Seven Days fight around the capital of the Confederacy. Everyone knows that for a week General Lee, in command of that grand old organization, the Army of Northern Virginia, attacked, defeated and drove the Army of the Potomac, under General McClellan, from one battlefield to another, finally penning him up on the banks of the James River, under shelter of the Federal gunboats, but very few at this late day can recall the incidents preceding the opening of the first day's fight at Mechanicsville, and how General Lee manoeuvered to uncover the heavy works built by McClellan across the road leading from Richmond to and beyond the Chickahominy river. For weeks after the battle of Seven Pines General Mc
ity. That little was General Lee and his three divisions under Longstreet, Hill and Jackson. The latter, it is true, a week before the Seven Days fight began, was in the Valley of Virginia, giving one commander of the three divisions of the Federal army opposed to him a whipping one day, another the day after, and keeping all of them guessing where he was or whose turn it was next to be attacked and routed. While they were guessing Old Jack and his foot cavalry slipped off, and before General Banks (Jackson's quartermaster and commissary general) and his subordinates knew his whereabouts he was on General Lee's left flank, as we will see later on. There is no doubt about the fact of McClellan's ability. He was a fine general, and had under him a fine body of well equipped troops, but he was no match for General Lee, either in strategy or hard fighting. During these weeks General Lee had been lying quietly between the Chickahominy and Richmond, gathering together such forces as
John Minor Botts (search for this): chapter 1.9
stopped and requested that they would send word to my father that our battery had been ordered off, we knew not where. This message was very kindly and courteously delivered, and I am satisfied that it was due to the fervent prayers of that righteous man that my life was preserved through the three or four special incidents which I shall relate as I go on. Just before dark we crossed the Chickahominy—at that point a very small creek—at a place called Half Sink, then belonging to Hon. John Minor Botts. Here we found the first Federal pickets, but before any shots could be exchanged, they made off in great haste, and we went into camp for the night. By daylight next morning we were again on the march. From time to time we found the Federal cavalry disposed to contest our advance, and from where we crossed the Chickahominy to Atlee's Station, on the Chesapeake and Ohio railroad, we had an almost continual skirmish. Just before reaching the railroad the enemy made a very determ
L. O'B. Branch (search for this): chapter 1.9
was the Hanover troops acting as pickets; between us and Richmond, Branch's Brigade of North Carolinians. On the 24th of June, 1862, in thort while, with the cavalry in front, our battery in the centre and Branch's Brigade in the rear, we were swinging down the road towards the nof the Yankees, and finally reached Mechanicsville. The advance of Branch's Brigade, our battery and the cavalry had uncovered the Meadowbrideek. Captain Johnson ordered the writer forward to report to General Branch, to state that the battery was up, and ask where he desired itittle mare to the top of the hill in order to get over to where General Branch had established his field headquarters, but failed each time to and proceeded on foot. After some little difficulty I reached General Branch and reported. Just as I was about to receive his instructions ave been led by a desire to state as a fact for future history that Branch's Brigade, Duke Johnson's Battery, and, I think, the Hanover Troop,
Hampden Chamberlayne (search for this): chapter 1.9
nd stopped, evidently regarding this point as the most critical along the whole line. Several efforts were made to get General Lee to retire, as now and then one of our men or horses would be shot. He refused, however, to leave and it was well he did not, for about that time a South Carolina brigade commenced coming out of the woods perfectly panic-stricken. General Lee ordered our guns unlimbered, then turning to the men around him, among whom I recall Major Lindsay Walker and Captain Hampden Chamberlayne, his adjutant, remarked: Gentlemen, we must rally those men. Immediately galloping forward himself, he called on the South Carolinians to stop and for the sake of their State go back to their work. The panic stopped and the men gallantly rallied, and led by General Maxey Gregg and the equally gallant A. C. Haskell, the line was reversed and the thunder of musketry grew as loud as ever. At this time there was no cheering—every man was fighting with his mouth closed and standing
William G. Crenshaw (search for this): chapter 1.9
pushed his tall silk hat from his forehead in a rather undignified manner. Just then Crenshaw's Battery was ordered forward to defend the left of our line against a flanking movement, and gallantly they went in at a full gallop, turning into the open space above mentioned and commencing to fire as soon as they could get their guns unlimbered. Of course the Yankees began to fire as soon as the guns appeared beyond the edge of the woods. Our attention was called to this firing, and before Crenshaw could begin to fire, our dignified friend had let down his umbrella, crammed his silk hat on the back of his head, and using the umbrella as a whip, was riding the pony down the hill towards the road at his utmost speed. Considering the man and the circumstances I do not remember ever to have seen a more ludicrous sight. He passed our battery at full gallop, with his heels and arms still flying; riding along the guns the men ridiculing him and calling him to come back, that the battle had
Dorsey Cullen (search for this): chapter 1.9
son and began running along the ground again. Just as I reached the ground two men of the battery climbed, as I had done, to the top of the caisson, and as they reached the seat a shell burst immediately over the caisson, killing two horses, the driver and these two men; whereas I, running immediately by the side of the caisson, was not injured in the least. As we reached the road coming out we met Longstreet's Division, with Pickett's Brigade in front, George and Charley Pickett and Dorsey Cullen leading the advance with the men fresh from Richmond, coming up at a double quick. These leaders I had known from boyhood, and as I clasped the hands of these gallant men one at a time, tears of excitement forced themselves from my eyes, and I remarked: Unless you break that line we are badly whipped. Wheeling to the right Longstreet pushed his division across the creek and up the hill, and it was only then that the Federal line broke and the yells of our men rang through the gathering
Jefferson Davis (search for this): chapter 1.9
artermaster and commissary general) and his subordinates knew his whereabouts he was on General Lee's left flank, as we will see later on. There is no doubt about the fact of McClellan's ability. He was a fine general, and had under him a fine body of well equipped troops, but he was no match for General Lee, either in strategy or hard fighting. During these weeks General Lee had been lying quietly between the Chickahominy and Richmond, gathering together such forces as he could induce Mr. Davis to give him, and while the small arms and artillery were not effective, nor the ammunition as good as that of McClellan, still there was no hesitancy on the part of General Lee in attacking McClellan and his army. Our battery (Marmaduke Johnson's) had for some weeks been camped in the field between Colonel John B. Young's house, afterwards purchased by Mr. Ginter, and Emmanuel Church. On the Brook Road, near the Yellow Tavern, was the Hanover troops acting as pickets; between us and Ri
ks General Lee had been lying quietly between the Chickahominy and Richmond, gathering together such forces as he could induce Mr. Davis to give him, and while the small arms and artillery were not effective, nor the ammunition as good as that of McClellan, still there was no hesitancy on the part of General Lee in attacking McClellan and his army. Our battery (Marmaduke Johnson's) had for some weeks been camped in the field between Colonel John B. Young's house, afterwards purchased by Mr. Ginter, and Emmanuel Church. On the Brook Road, near the Yellow Tavern, was the Hanover troops acting as pickets; between us and Richmond, Branch's Brigade of North Carolinians. On the 24th of June, 1862, in the afternoon, orders were issued for us to move out the Brook Turnpike, and in a very short while, with the cavalry in front, our battery in the centre and Branch's Brigade in the rear, we were swinging down the road towards the northwest. As we passed the gate of Mr. Stewart's beautifu
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