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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones).

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Jefferson Davis (search for this): chapter 1.1
The ninety-third anniversary of the birth of Pres. Jefferson Davis. Celebrated by various organizations of Southern women at New Orleans, La., June 3, 1901, with the eloquent oration of Hon. Charlw Orleans, La., Picayune, June 4, 1901.] The ninety-third anniversary of the birthday of Jefferson Davis, the great leader of the Confederacy, whose memory is enshrined in thousands of hearts thrortook to make the day the occasion of a demonstration of love and devotion to the memory of Jefferson Davis, and a beautiful all-day celebration was planned, which for patriotism and loyalty has selduth laid down their lives. The feature of the opening was the grand oration on the Life of Jefferson Davis, delivered by Judge Charles E. Fenner, the distinguished Southerner and jurist, at whose residence Mr. Davis passed from earth to the eternal camping grounds above. Another interesting feature was the presentation to Memorial Hall of the sword of a private soldier who laid down his life o
B. M. Palmer (search for this): chapter 1.1
t Association, of which Mrs. A. W. Roberts is president. At Memorial Hall, at 3 o'clock, the New Orleans Chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy held their celebration. This was the occasion also of the presentation of a badge of honor to General Joseph Adolph Chalaron, whose gallant services during the war and unswerving faithfulness to the cause ever since entitled him to this distinction from the chapter. At both these celebrations the venerable Confederate chaplain, Dr. B. M. Palmer, was present, and delivered the prayer. The presence of this faithful Confederate hero is always the occasion of joy and loyal demonstration from the men who followed him in the dark days of ‘61 and ‘65, and whose love has grown stronger as the years have rolled away. At night the day closed with a magnificent celebration at Memorial Hall. It was fitting, indeed, that the Ladies' Confederate Memorial Association of New Orleans, the oldest of all the Confederate organizations of wom
Charles E. Fenner (search for this): chapter 1.1
The ninety-third anniversary of the birth of Pres. Jefferson Davis. Celebrated by various organizations of Southern women at New Orleans, La., June 3, 1901, with the eloquent oration of Hon. Charles E. Fenner. [from the New Orleans, La., Picayune, June 4, 1901.] The ninety-third anniversary of the birthday of Jefferson Davis, the great leader of the Confederacy, whose memory is enshrined in thousands of hearts throughout the South, was celebrated in a fitting manner in New Orleans yesterdheir husbands, fathers and relatives fought through fire and blood, and for which thousands of the noblest of the South laid down their lives. The feature of the opening was the grand oration on the Life of Jefferson Davis, delivered by Judge Charles E. Fenner, the distinguished Southerner and jurist, at whose residence Mr. Davis passed from earth to the eternal camping grounds above. Another interesting feature was the presentation to Memorial Hall of the sword of a private soldier who laid
June 4th, 1901 AD (search for this): chapter 1.1
The ninety-third anniversary of the birth of Pres. Jefferson Davis. Celebrated by various organizations of Southern women at New Orleans, La., June 3, 1901, with the eloquent oration of Hon. Charles E. Fenner. [from the New Orleans, La., Picayune, June 4, 1901.] The ninety-third anniversary of the birthday of Jefferson Davis, the great leader of the Confederacy, whose memory is enshrined in thousands of hearts throughout the South, was celebrated in a fitting manner in New Orleans yesterday. Some weeks ago the loyal daughters of Louisiana undertook to make the day the occasion of a demonstration of love and devotion to the memory of Jefferson Davis, and a beautiful all-day celebration was planned, which for patriotism and loyalty has seldom been equaled in the South. The sun shone in all its brilliancy yesterday, out in the meadows the flowers were blooming, and over in Metairie cemetery, where for two years the remains of the South's great hero reposed, flowers placed by
A. W. Roberts (search for this): chapter 1.1
flowers were blooming, and over in Metairie cemetery, where for two years the remains of the South's great hero reposed, flowers placed by loving hands marked the spot henceforth sacred to his name alone. The old veterans assembled at different hours during the day to honor the great chieftain. At 11 o'clock the celebration began by a memorial meeting in the banquet hall of the St. Charles Hotel. It was held under the auspices of the Jefferson Davis Monument Association, of which Mrs. A. W. Roberts is president. At Memorial Hall, at 3 o'clock, the New Orleans Chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy held their celebration. This was the occasion also of the presentation of a badge of honor to General Joseph Adolph Chalaron, whose gallant services during the war and unswerving faithfulness to the cause ever since entitled him to this distinction from the chapter. At both these celebrations the venerable Confederate chaplain, Dr. B. M. Palmer, was present, and delive
Joseph Adolph Chalaron (search for this): chapter 1.1
d at different hours during the day to honor the great chieftain. At 11 o'clock the celebration began by a memorial meeting in the banquet hall of the St. Charles Hotel. It was held under the auspices of the Jefferson Davis Monument Association, of which Mrs. A. W. Roberts is president. At Memorial Hall, at 3 o'clock, the New Orleans Chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy held their celebration. This was the occasion also of the presentation of a badge of honor to General Joseph Adolph Chalaron, whose gallant services during the war and unswerving faithfulness to the cause ever since entitled him to this distinction from the chapter. At both these celebrations the venerable Confederate chaplain, Dr. B. M. Palmer, was present, and delivered the prayer. The presence of this faithful Confederate hero is always the occasion of joy and loyal demonstration from the men who followed him in the dark days of ‘61 and ‘65, and whose love has grown stronger as the years have r
June 3rd, 1901 AD (search for this): chapter 1.1
The ninety-third anniversary of the birth of Pres. Jefferson Davis. Celebrated by various organizations of Southern women at New Orleans, La., June 3, 1901, with the eloquent oration of Hon. Charles E. Fenner. [from the New Orleans, La., Picayune, June 4, 1901.] The ninety-third anniversary of the birthday of Jefferson Davis, the great leader of the Confederacy, whose memory is enshrined in thousands of hearts throughout the South, was celebrated in a fitting manner in New Orleans yesterday. Some weeks ago the loyal daughters of Louisiana undertook to make the day the occasion of a demonstration of love and devotion to the memory of Jefferson Davis, and a beautiful all-day celebration was planned, which for patriotism and loyalty has seldom been equaled in the South. The sun shone in all its brilliancy yesterday, out in the meadows the flowers were blooming, and over in Metairie cemetery, where for two years the remains of the South's great hero reposed, flowers placed by
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.1
s. Jefferson Davis. Celebrated by various organizations of Southern women at New Orleans, La., June 3, 1901, with the eloquent oration of Hon. Charles E. Fenner. [from the New Orleans, La., Picayune, June 4, 1901.] The ninety-third anniversary of the birthday of Jefferson Davis, the great leader of the Confederacy, whose memory is enshrined in thousands of hearts throughout the South, was celebrated in a fitting manner in New Orleans yesterday. Some weeks ago the loyal daughters of Louisiana undertook to make the day the occasion of a demonstration of love and devotion to the memory of Jefferson Davis, and a beautiful all-day celebration was planned, which for patriotism and loyalty has seldom been equaled in the South. The sun shone in all its brilliancy yesterday, out in the meadows the flowers were blooming, and over in Metairie cemetery, where for two years the remains of the South's great hero reposed, flowers placed by loving hands marked the spot henceforth sacred to
New Orleans (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.1
The ninety-third anniversary of the birth of Pres. Jefferson Davis. Celebrated by various organizations of Southern women at New Orleans, La., June 3, 1901, with the eloquent oration of Hon. Charles E. Fenner. [from the New Orleans, La., Picayune, June 4, 1901.] The ninety-third anniversary of the birthday of Jefferson Davis, the great leader of the Confederacy, whose memory is enshrined in thousands of hearts throughout the South, was celebrated in a fitting manner in New Orleans yesterdNew Orleans, La., Picayune, June 4, 1901.] The ninety-third anniversary of the birthday of Jefferson Davis, the great leader of the Confederacy, whose memory is enshrined in thousands of hearts throughout the South, was celebrated in a fitting manner in New Orleans yesterday. Some weeks ago the loyal daughters of Louisiana undertook to make the day the occasion of a demonstration of love and devotion to the memory of Jefferson Davis, and a beautiful all-day celebration was planned, which for patriotism and loyalty has seldom been equaled in the South. The sun shone in all its brilliancy yesterday, out in the meadows the flowers were blooming, and over in Metairie cemetery, where for two years the remains of the South's great hero reposed, flowers placed by
Robert E. Lee (search for this): chapter 1.2
riding erect as an arrow, his face wreathed with smiles as he received the plaudits of his fellowmen. It was at Manassas that Mr. McCaleb next saw the great president. It was the day after the battle of Bull Run. And again he saw him in the last dying hours of the Confederacy, when he learned more and more to esteem, honor and love him. The Confederate government had abandoned Richmond, and was temporarily stationed at Danville, Va., when General Extra Billy Smith brought the sad news of Lee's surrender. All was confusion, and in hot haste. Mr. Mc-Caleb said, we hurried to Charlotte, N. C. There Mr. Davis sent for me, and told me that the Confederate cabinet was about to begin its journey southward, and in command of a brave band of Mississippians belonging to Harris' and Humphreys' Mississippi brigades. I accompanied him as far south as Washington, Ga. In that distinguished cavalcade was President Davis himself, General John C. Breckenridge, Secretary of War; Hon. Steph
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