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valry is dissolved, and he is a fugitive, but in what direction is not known. (104 War of the Rebellion, p. 666.) On the 11th of May, 1865, Lieut.-Colonel B. D. Pritchard, commanding the Fourth Michigan Cavalry, reported that at daylight on the 10th, at Irwinville, Ga., about seventy-five miles from Macon, he had captured Mr. Davis with his family, his wife's sister and brother, Mr. Reagan, his Postmaster-General, Mr. Burton N. Harrison, his private secretary, Colonel William Preston Johnstonnt to the reverend gentleman, who, on the 9th of December, 1865, presented the same to General Miles, who, fearing some deadly plot, wired the Adjutant-General to know if the order was genuine and whether the old doctor should be admitted. On the 10th his fears were put to rest and the order was verified. (121 War of the Rebellion, 818, 834.) Dr. Minnigerode, however, had to give a species of ecclesiastical parole, confining his conversation strictly to ghostly topics. (Id., 874.) On the 2d
on, p. 555.) On the 23d of May, Mr. C. A. Dana, Assistant Secretary of War, ordered General Miles to direct Colonel Pritchard to bring with him the woman's dress in which Jefferson Davis was captured. (Id., p. 569.) After his capture, Mr. Davis was sent to Savannah. Thence he was carried to Fortress Monroe in the steamer Clyde, under a heavy guard, commanded by Colonel Pritchard. The steamer was convoyed by the United States steam sloop of war Tuscarora. The Secretary of War, on the 14th, thanked General Wilson for his vigilance in preventing the escape of the prisoner, and also thanked the gallant officers and men by whom the capture was made. He also asked for their names, in order that they might receive appropriate medals. These gallant captors consisted of two regiments of picked men, while the party captured was composed of two old and feeble civilians, several unattached officers, two ladies and four children. (104 War of Rebellion, p. 761.) On the 14th of May, the S
January 7th (search for this): chapter 1.7
mained in abeyance until the 10th of August, 1865, when the President wrote to Chief-Justice Chase asking for a conference in reference to the time, place, and manner of trial of Jefferson Davis. To this Judge Chase responded that he would come to Washington on the next Thursday. What took place at this conference is not known. (Id., 715-6.) On the 21st of September, 1865, the Senate called upon the President for information on the subject of the trial, but no response was made until January 7th, when reports on the subject from the Attorney General, Mr. James Speed, and the Secretary of War, Mr. E. M. Stanton, were filed. From these reports it seems that it was deemed proper that he should be tried for treason in the State of Virginia, where the Chief Justice was to preside, but that for reasons the Chief Justice would not hold the court. On the 16th of January, 1866, the Senate, becoming impatient under the outcry against the unconstitutional delay, called on the President
February 1st (search for this): chapter 1.7
ws, C. J. Faulkner, and R. H. Dulaney, W. N. McVeigh, H. B. Taylor, James A. Seddon, W. B. Richards, Jr., J. C. Breckinridge, and Jefferson Davis. (two cases.) The District Attorney, by leave of the court, saith that he will not prosecute further on behalf of the United States, against the above-named parties upon separate indictments for treason. It is, therefore, ordered by the court that the prosecutions aforesaid be dismissed. Strange to say, an order was entered upon the 1st of February, reciting that inasmuch as the indictments had been dismissed, he and his bondsmen were forever released. The motion, on appeal in the Supreme Court, of course, was never called, and is now filed amongst its archives. This recitation of the Trials and Trial of Jefferson Davis has not been prepared with the purpose of stirring up sectional animosities or reviving the bitterness of the past. Its aim has been solely to vindicate the truth of history, that its teachings may be taken
ict Court for the District of Virginia, and to ask an interview in regard to the trial of Mr. Davis for treason. It was arranged that he should be indicted at the May term (1865) of the United States Court at Norfolk, over which Underwood was to preside. This was to be done, despite the fact that the judge had previously been ofs, he said, had, on the 22nd day of May, 1866, passed an act providing that the Circuit Court of the United States should be held at Richmond on the first Monday in May and the fourth Monday in November in each year. This, the Attorney-General held, abrogated the special term fixed for October. But on the 23d of July Congress pas to guide his judicial finding. The result of this disagreement of the judges was that the motion to quash failed, and thereupon the case was continued until the May term, 1869. The fact of the disagreement was certified to the Supreme Court, that it might be there decided. This was the end of this celebrated cause. Later i
tant Adjutant-General. It was dated near Macon, Ga., on the 8th of May, 1865, and was addressed to Lieut.-Colonel H. N. Howland, commanding a brigade. The order says: You will have every port and ferry on the Ochmulgee and Altamaha rivers, from Hawkinsville to the Ohoopee river, well guarded, and make every effort to capture or kill Jefferson Davis, the rebel ex-President, who is supposed to be endeavoring to cross the Ochmulgee, south of Macon. (104 War of Rebellion, 665.) On the 8th of May, Brevet Major-General J. H. Wilson wrote General Upton: The President of the United States has issued his proclamation announcing that the Bureau of Military Justice has reported, upon indisputable evidence, that Jefferson Davis, Clement C. Clay, Jacob Thompson, George N. Sanders, Beverley Tucker, and W. C. Cleary, incited and concerted the assassination of Mr. Lincoln, and the attempted assassination of Mr. Seward. He, therefore, offers for the arrest of Davis, Clay, and Thompson $100
nt officials, Stanton, Dana, Holt, Halleck, President Johnson and others, were much excited and very industrious. Mr. Secretary Stanton ordered the casemates at Fortress Monroe to be prepared under the special direction of Major-General H. W. Halleck, who commanded the department of the James at Richmond. Halleck assumed his duties with some enthusiasm, and at once made several suggestions, which he obviously thought would be taken as marks of his efficiency at Washington. Thus, on the 13th of May, he wrote to the Secretary of War: If Jefferson Davis was captured in his wife's clothes, I respectfully suggest that he be sent North in the same habiliments (104 War of Rebellion, p. 741); and on the 15th he wrote that it would be well to send a special commander for Fortress Monroe, adding, the present one is a faithful officer, but not sharp enough to take charge of Jeff. Davis and his crew. (Id., p. 772-73.) In compliance with this last request Brevet-Major-General Nelson A. Mil
newspaper correspondent, but circulation was given to it by Major-General J. H. Wilson, who, in his official report to Mr. Stanton, the Secretary of War, on the 14th of May, makes the statement, saying he derived it from the captors. Colonel Pritchard, however, makes no such statement in his published official report and corresponays after Mr. Davis' death, also denied the whole story. The Secretary of War, however, rolled the statement under his tongue as a sweet morsel, and, on the 14th of May, wrote gleefully to the Rev. R. J. Breckinridge, of Kentucky, that Jefferson Davis was caught three days ago in Georgia trying to escape in his wife's clothes.(e party captured was composed of two old and feeble civilians, several unattached officers, two ladies and four children. (104 War of Rebellion, p. 761.) On the 14th of May, the Secretary of War cautioned Colonel Pritchard to be especially cautious to prevent the escape of his prisoner, and for that purpose he should be treated as
(104 War of Rebellion, p. 741); and on the 15th he wrote that it would be well to send a special commander for Fortress Monroe, adding, the present one is a faithful officer, but not sharp enough to take charge of Jeff. Davis and his crew. (Id., p. 772-73.) In compliance with this last request Brevet-Major-General Nelson A. Miles was selected as a person sharp enough to be Mr. Davis' jailor, and he reported to General Halleck for the purpose. (121 War of Rebellion, p. 560.) On the 19th of May the steamer Clyde reached Fortress Monroe, having aboard Mr. Davis and family, Mr. Stephens, Mr. Reagan, Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Clay, Major-General Joseph Wheeler and staff, Colonels Johnston and Lubbock, and Mr. Burton N. Harrison, besides one or two subaltern officers. The safeguards were at once augmented by placing a gunboat on each side of the Clyde. Stephens and Reagan were sent to Fort Warren; Wheeler and staff, Johnston and Lubbock, to Fort Delaware, and Harrison to Washington, whil
on. Mr. T. H. Peabody, a lawyer of St. Louis, and one of the captors, in a speech made before a Grand Army Post, a few days after Mr. Davis' death, also denied the whole story. The Secretary of War, however, rolled the statement under his tongue as a sweet morsel, and, on the 14th of May, wrote gleefully to the Rev. R. J. Breckinridge, of Kentucky, that Jefferson Davis was caught three days ago in Georgia trying to escape in his wife's clothes.(121 War of Rebellion, p. 555.) On the 23d of May, Mr. C. A. Dana, Assistant Secretary of War, ordered General Miles to direct Colonel Pritchard to bring with him the woman's dress in which Jefferson Davis was captured. (Id., p. 569.) After his capture, Mr. Davis was sent to Savannah. Thence he was carried to Fortress Monroe in the steamer Clyde, under a heavy guard, commanded by Colonel Pritchard. The steamer was convoyed by the United States steam sloop of war Tuscarora. The Secretary of War, on the 14th, thanked General Wilso
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