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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Old Point Comfort (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.7
The trials and trial of Jefferson Davis. A paper read by Charles M. Blackford, of the Lynchburg Bar, before the Tenth annual meeting of the Virginia State Bar Association, held at old Point Comfort, Va., July 17-19, 1900. Mr. President, Gentlemen of the Virginia State Bar Association, Ladies and Gentlemen. In the spring of 1865, the States and armies of the Southern Confederacy yielded to the overwhelming numbers of their adversaries and the failure of their own resources. The result was the surrender of a people whose constancy and whose heroic struggle had won the applause and admiration of the world, and will, in the far future, be the common boast of every American citizen. Of the States which thus yielded to fate, President Jefferson Davis had been the representative and executive head. When the armies which had maintained his government were successively dissolved he was left defenceless. He was nearly sixty years of age, in feeble health, and much worn with the
Savannah (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.7
the 23d of May, Mr. C. A. Dana, Assistant Secretary of War, ordered General Miles to direct Colonel Pritchard to bring with him the woman's dress in which Jefferson Davis was captured. (Id., p. 569.) After his capture, Mr. Davis was sent to Savannah. Thence he was carried to Fortress Monroe in the steamer Clyde, under a heavy guard, commanded by Colonel Pritchard. The steamer was convoyed by the United States steam sloop of war Tuscarora. The Secretary of War, on the 14th, thanked Genwould be better, and that she might correspond with her husband. She also begged him to inform her what was the condition of his health. (121 War of Rebellion, 666.) To this General Meigs made no reply, but wrote to the Commanding General at Savannah a letter, which he sent through the Secretary of War, in which he said: I was under obligations to Mr. and also Mrs. Davis for kindness and courtesy received before they inaugurated rebellion and civil war. The effect of that war, my p
Lynchburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.7
reserve our researches for the use of those writers whose environments will enable them to be impartial. To that end this paper has been written. The other side in our contest was never just in their judgment of Mr. Davis, nor has it given him due credit for either his intellectual or his moral strength, his courage, his devotion to what he regarded right, or his faithfulness in the discharge of duty. This prejudice, inflamed by the natural grief and indignation aroused by the murder of President Lincoln, made the treatment of Mr. Davis as a prisoner more rigorous than it would have been otherwise, but it cannot justify or excuse the insults and inhumanities to which he was subjected by those to whose custody he was committed as a prisoner of State, or the cruelty of those who so long denied the constitutional right of a speedy and impartial trial. These wrongs it is our duty to forgive, but it is also our duty not to forget. Charles M. Blackford. Lynchburg, Va., July 18, 1900.
Henrico (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.7
e Mr. Davis was brought to trial Messrs. Horace Greeley, Cornelius Vanderbilt, and Gerrit Smith offered themselves as bondsmen on any bail bond which might be required of him, and were among the obligors when it was finally taken, nearly two years after the tender was made. An indictment against Davis was found in the Circuit Court of the United States for the District of Virginia. on the 8th of May, 1866. It presented— Jefferson Davis, late of the city of Richmond, in the county of Henrico, in the district of Virginia, aforesaid, yeoman, being an inhabitant of and residing within the United States of America, not having the fear of God before his eyes nor weighing the duty of his said allegiance, but being moved and seduced by the instigation of the devil, and wickedly devising, intending the peace and tranquility of the said United States of America to disturb, and the Government of the said United States of America to subvert, and to stir, move, and incite insurrection, reb
Altamaha (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.7
racked easily by Federal troopers, who, scattered over the States through which his line of march lay, were on the lookout for him; with what intent may be inferred from an order issued by command of General R. H. G. Minty, by F. W. Scott, Captain and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General. It was dated near Macon, Ga., on the 8th of May, 1865, and was addressed to Lieut.-Colonel H. N. Howland, commanding a brigade. The order says: You will have every port and ferry on the Ochmulgee and Altamaha rivers, from Hawkinsville to the Ohoopee river, well guarded, and make every effort to capture or kill Jefferson Davis, the rebel ex-President, who is supposed to be endeavoring to cross the Ochmulgee, south of Macon. (104 War of Rebellion, 665.) On the 8th of May, Brevet Major-General J. H. Wilson wrote General Upton: The President of the United States has issued his proclamation announcing that the Bureau of Military Justice has reported, upon indisputable evidence, that Jefferson Dav
Moenus (Germany) (search for this): chapter 1.7
delphia; R. Barton Haxall, Isaac Davenport, Abraham Warwick, Gustavus A. Myers, W. W. Crump, James Lyons, John A. Meredith, W. H. Lyons, John Minor Botts, Thomas W. Doswell, James Thomas, Jr., and Thomas R. Price, of Virginia. When the bond was duly executed the marshal was directed to discharge the prisoner, which was done amid deafening applause. The streets around the Custom House were crowded with people awaiting the result. As soon as the decision was announced some one ran to the Main-street window of the Custom House and shouted: The President is bailed! A mighty roar of applause went up from the people below, which was taken up and echoed and re-echoed from street to street and house to house, though, strange to say, a considerable period of time elapsed before the crowd on Bank street were informed of the result; then they joined most heartily in the shouts. A company of United States infantry had been brought up to the door of the Custom House when Mr. Davis was carr
Fort Delaware (Delaware, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.7
r of Rebellion, p. 560.) On the 19th of May the steamer Clyde reached Fortress Monroe, having aboard Mr. Davis and family, Mr. Stephens, Mr. Reagan, Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Clay, Major-General Joseph Wheeler and staff, Colonels Johnston and Lubbock, and Mr. Burton N. Harrison, besides one or two subaltern officers. The safeguards were at once augmented by placing a gunboat on each side of the Clyde. Stephens and Reagan were sent to Fort Warren; Wheeler and staff, Johnston and Lubbock, to Fort Delaware, and Harrison to Washington, while the women and children were sent back South. Fearing that Halleck might not be harsh enough or Miles sharp enough for the occasion, Mr. Stanton sent the Assistant Secretary of War, Mr. C. A. Dana, to the fort to supervise the details of the incarceration of the two prisoners, Davis and Clay. He was present on the 22d of June, when they were removed, and wrote a graphic account of the proceeding, which has been preserved (121 War of Rebellion, p. 563
Mississippi (United States) (search for this): chapter 1.7
ies which had maintained his government were successively dissolved he was left defenceless. He was nearly sixty years of age, in feeble health, and much worn with the mighty cares and anxieties which had rested upon him for four years. On the 16th of April, 1865, as soon as he found that Johnston must surrender, he started with resolute will from Greensboroa, N. C., with his family, staff, and some of his cabinet; his avowed object being to join the Confederate forces west of the Mississippi river. His party was too large for the success of such an undertaking. He was tracked easily by Federal troopers, who, scattered over the States through which his line of march lay, were on the lookout for him; with what intent may be inferred from an order issued by command of General R. H. G. Minty, by F. W. Scott, Captain and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General. It was dated near Macon, Ga., on the 8th of May, 1865, and was addressed to Lieut.-Colonel H. N. Howland, commanding a brigad
Wade Hampton (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.7
greement was certified to the Supreme Court, that it might be there decided. This was the end of this celebrated cause. Later in December, 1868, President Johnson published his general amnesty proclamation, which by common consent was held to cover Mr. Davis' case, and upon the 15th of February, 1869, the following order was entered in the Circuit Court of Richmond: Monday, February 15, 1869. United States Vs. Upon Indictment for Treason. Thomas P. Turner, William Smith, Wade Hampton, Benjamin Huger, Henry A. Wise, Samuel Cooper, G. W. C. Lee, W. H. F. Lee, Charles Mallory, William Mahone, O. F. Baxter, Robert E. Lee, James Longstreet, William E. Taylor, Fitzhugh Lee, George W. Alexander, Robert H. Booker, John DeBree, M. D. Corse, Eppa Hunton, Roger A. Pryor, D. B. Bridgeford, Jubal A. Early, R. S. Ewell, William S. Winder, George Booker, Cornelius Boyle, William H. Payne, R. S. Andrews, C. J. Faulkner, and R. H. Dulaney, W. N. McVeigh, H. B. Taylor, James A. Seddon,
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.7
January 7th, when reports on the subject from the Attorney General, Mr. James Speed, and the Secretary of War, Mr. E. M. Stanton, were filed. From these reports it seems that it was deemed proper that he should be tried for treason in the State of Virginia, where the Chief Justice was to preside, but that for reasons the Chief Justice would not hold the court. On the 16th of January, 1866, the Senate, becoming impatient under the outcry against the unconstitutional delay, called on the Pre his residence to ascertain whether he would entertain a motion to release Mr. Davis on bail. The Chief-Justice, without any formal application for bail, announced that he considered it improper for him to act in this matter so long as the State of Virginia was under military rule, and that he would not act until the writ of habeas corpus was fully restored and martial law abrogated. His opinion on this subject, prepared by himself, is set out in full in General Johnson's report. Mr. O'Con
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