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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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avelling in a direct line, would have crossed the Catawba river at Beatty's Ferry, but in the night they took the road to Beatty's Ford, which delayed them a day or two. They saw Wade Hampton in Yorkville, S. C. When they mounted their horses to go he was standing in the door of a broad granary and said: May God speed and bless you on your errand, and my prayers are that you may be successful in your undertaking. We went on towards Washington, said Mr. Sadler, and on the morning of May 3d, about 10 o'clock, were within three miles of the place. Men were going in every direction; some paroled, some were not, but each one was making for home. Everybody inquired of everybody for news, and we were fairly well posted as to movements, etc., and from them we learned that President Davis had left Washington nearly two days before and gone in a southerly direction, and that the enemy came the previous day about 3 P. M. We turned into a woods, along a fence, into what seemed a swamp
August 10th, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 1.18
mber, 1902.] A veteran describes his experiences in Durham at the close of the war. A Baltimore correspondent of the Charlotte (N. C.) Observer, writes as follows: Mr. David M. Sadler, who lives at 907 Arlington avenue, in this city, claims that he was one of those who fired the last volley of Johnston's army, and he also tells of a daring project of General Joe Wheeler's at the close of the Civil war. Sadler is an Arkansas man, and was in the first battle at Wilson Creek, Mo., August 10, 1861. From that time he served continuously to the end of the struggle, having had but one twelve-hour leave, and never having missed a day from the service. He was with Wheeler on his last raid in Tennessee, and followed the trail of Sherman's march to the sea. The Eleventh Texas, of which he was a member, was, he says, on rear guard at Branchville, S. C., and at Raleigh, ending its career at what was then known as Durham's Station. The last shot, as described by Mr. Sadler, was fir
November, 1902 AD (search for this): chapter 1.18
Johnston's last volley. [from the Charlotte (N. C.) Observer, November, 1902.] A veteran describes his experiences in Durham at the close of the war. A Baltimore correspondent of the Charlotte (N. C.) Observer, writes as follows: Mr. David M. Sadler, who lives at 907 Arlington avenue, in this city, claims that he was one of those who fired the last volley of Johnston's army, and he also tells of a daring project of General Joe Wheeler's at the close of the Civil war. Sadler is an Arkansas man, and was in the first battle at Wilson Creek, Mo., August 10, 1861. From that time he served continuously to the end of the struggle, having had but one twelve-hour leave, and never having missed a day from the service. He was with Wheeler on his last raid in Tennessee, and followed the trail of Sherman's march to the sea. The Eleventh Texas, of which he was a member, was, he says, on rear guard at Branchville, S. C., and at Raleigh, ending its career at what was then known as Dur
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