hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in descending order. Sort in ascending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
David Hunter 245 3 Browse Search
United States (United States) 186 0 Browse Search
Robert E. Lee 174 0 Browse Search
Lynchburg (Virginia, United States) 172 6 Browse Search
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) 158 0 Browse Search
Georgia (Georgia, United States) 142 0 Browse Search
James 135 1 Browse Search
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) 132 0 Browse Search
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) 128 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis 116 2 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

Found 113 total hits in 33 results.

1 2 3 4
Wilson Creek (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.18
C.) Observer, November, 1902.] A veteran describes his experiences in Durham at the close of the war. A Baltimore correspondent of the Charlotte (N. C.) Observer, writes as follows: Mr. David M. Sadler, who lives at 907 Arlington avenue, in this city, claims that he was one of those who fired the last volley of Johnston's army, and he also tells of a daring project of General Joe Wheeler's at the close of the Civil war. Sadler is an Arkansas man, and was in the first battle at Wilson Creek, Mo., August 10, 1861. From that time he served continuously to the end of the struggle, having had but one twelve-hour leave, and never having missed a day from the service. He was with Wheeler on his last raid in Tennessee, and followed the trail of Sherman's march to the sea. The Eleventh Texas, of which he was a member, was, he says, on rear guard at Branchville, S. C., and at Raleigh, ending its career at what was then known as Durham's Station. The last shot, as described by M
Wade Hampton (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.18
s on the graves of our fallen comrades, and gather supplies for a winter campaign and skirmish on the prairies of Texas with rifle artillery, and, if we have to, will cross the Rio Grande into Mexico, for the enemy shall never have the head of the Confederacy. Hampton's words. Mr. Sadler says this band, travelling in a direct line, would have crossed the Catawba river at Beatty's Ferry, but in the night they took the road to Beatty's Ford, which delayed them a day or two. They saw Wade Hampton in Yorkville, S. C. When they mounted their horses to go he was standing in the door of a broad granary and said: May God speed and bless you on your errand, and my prayers are that you may be successful in your undertaking. We went on towards Washington, said Mr. Sadler, and on the morning of May 3d, about 10 o'clock, were within three miles of the place. Men were going in every direction; some paroled, some were not, but each one was making for home. Everybody inquired of eve
Chapel Hill, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.18
ilarated, fairly lubricated; for, when a squadron would fire, which would always check the enemy, the lubricated squadron would countercharge, and sometimes in close six-shooter range. The enemy came in right along, seemed to be looking for business, and we did not have to wait long at any time until ten or eleven o'clock. My squadron took a position behind a small field on the left-hand side of the road—the field was, say 150 or 200 yards wide. We were on a hillside, six miles from Chapel Hill. We had waited longer than usual, when a Yank hallooed on the other side of the field: Hello, Johnny; don't shoot! We want to make peace with you. We hallooed back: All right. Then he rode out in the fence corner in plain view and hallooed: Johnny, what command is that? The Eleventh Texas. He hallooed back: What is the matter with you boys this morning? We are drunk and reckless, and if you want to fight come over! I thought there was something the matter, for
Yorkville (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.18
our fallen comrades, and gather supplies for a winter campaign and skirmish on the prairies of Texas with rifle artillery, and, if we have to, will cross the Rio Grande into Mexico, for the enemy shall never have the head of the Confederacy. Hampton's words. Mr. Sadler says this band, travelling in a direct line, would have crossed the Catawba river at Beatty's Ferry, but in the night they took the road to Beatty's Ford, which delayed them a day or two. They saw Wade Hampton in Yorkville, S. C. When they mounted their horses to go he was standing in the door of a broad granary and said: May God speed and bless you on your errand, and my prayers are that you may be successful in your undertaking. We went on towards Washington, said Mr. Sadler, and on the morning of May 3d, about 10 o'clock, were within three miles of the place. Men were going in every direction; some paroled, some were not, but each one was making for home. Everybody inquired of everybody for news, a
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.18
the sea. The Eleventh Texas, of which he was a member, was, he says, on rear guard at Branchville, S. C., and at Raleigh, ending its career at what was then known as Durham's Station. The last shot, as described by Mr. Sadler, was fired in North Carolina, near Durham, after the preliminaries for the surrender of General Joseph E. Johnston to General William T. Sherman had been arranged. The Eleventh Texas was a part of General Harrison's Brigade, and had dwindled from a full regiment down toting or copying paroles. Each man got one. General Wheeler took parole as Lieutenant Sharp of Company C, Eleventh Georgia. He was mounted on a spotted stud that was captured from General Kilpatrick near Fayetteville, on the Cape Fear river, North Carolina. Then General Wheeler gave us a few parting words, in which he said that we no longer owed allegiance to the Confederacy; that we were free to go and shift for ourselves; that our cause for the present was lost. Look for the worst, but h
Mississippi (United States) (search for this): chapter 1.18
through the camp at Durham that General Wheeler wanted volunteers to escort Mr. Davis to Mexico. War-worn as were these old veterans, he could have secured all of them if necessary. But he chose only 151, most of them from the Eleventh Texas. The speech of General Wheeler to this little band of followers Mr. Sadler quotes as follows: The Confederate Government for the present is powerless to act, but its head is alive and shall not die. We will take President Davis across the Mississippi river and carry on guerrilla warfare; make raids back across the river, in the spring visit our old stamping-grounds, strew flowers on the graves of our fallen comrades, and gather supplies for a winter campaign and skirmish on the prairies of Texas with rifle artillery, and, if we have to, will cross the Rio Grande into Mexico, for the enemy shall never have the head of the Confederacy. Hampton's words. Mr. Sadler says this band, travelling in a direct line, would have crossed the Ca
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 1.18
ly through Texas, and place him on Mexican soil, where he would be safe from harm. Mr. Sadler says that on the day of Johnston's surrender the news spread through the camp at Durham that General Wheeler wanted volunteers to escort Mr. Davis to Mexico. War-worn as were these old veterans, he could have secured all of them if necessary. But he chose only 151, most of them from the Eleventh Texas. The speech of General Wheeler to this little band of followers Mr. Sadler quotes as follows: he spring visit our old stamping-grounds, strew flowers on the graves of our fallen comrades, and gather supplies for a winter campaign and skirmish on the prairies of Texas with rifle artillery, and, if we have to, will cross the Rio Grande into Mexico, for the enemy shall never have the head of the Confederacy. Hampton's words. Mr. Sadler says this band, travelling in a direct line, would have crossed the Catawba river at Beatty's Ferry, but in the night they took the road to Beatty's F
Charlotte (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.18
Johnston's last volley. [from the Charlotte (N. C.) Observer, November, 1902.] A veteran describes his experiences in Durham at the close of the war. A Baltimore correspondent of the Charlotte (N. C.) Observer, writes as follows: Mr. David M. Sadler, who lives at 907 Arlington avenue, in this city, claims that he was one of those who fired the last volley of Johnston's army, and he also tells of a daring project of General Joe Wheeler's at the close of the Civil war. Sadler is an ArCharlotte (N. C.) Observer, writes as follows: Mr. David M. Sadler, who lives at 907 Arlington avenue, in this city, claims that he was one of those who fired the last volley of Johnston's army, and he also tells of a daring project of General Joe Wheeler's at the close of the Civil war. Sadler is an Arkansas man, and was in the first battle at Wilson Creek, Mo., August 10, 1861. From that time he served continuously to the end of the struggle, having had but one twelve-hour leave, and never having missed a day from the service. He was with Wheeler on his last raid in Tennessee, and followed the trail of Sherman's march to the sea. The Eleventh Texas, of which he was a member, was, he says, on rear guard at Branchville, S. C., and at Raleigh, ending its career at what was then known as D
Ocmulgee (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.18
ith a few chums, mount his horse and go, or probably six, eight or ten would go together. In my squad there were seventeen, and, after we got away from camp, we held a counsel of war. We determined to go south of Washington and scout around and try to find President Davis. But we got no trace of him. Once we thought we were on his trail. We learned that there was some high official with several wagons and ambulances southwest of us. We hurried forward and overtook the train on the Ocmulgee river. It proved to be General Braxton Bragg. We inquired of him, but he knew nothing of Mr. Davis. We went on past him on the river road to a bridge. We could see the bridge for a mile or more. When we got within a few hundred yards of the bridge we halted and held a counsel as to what to do, for there was a Yankee picket on the far end of the bridge. Whilst we were talking as to what was best to do, General Bragg's wagons came up and turned into the woods and went into camp. The picke
Branchville (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.18
t of General Joe Wheeler's at the close of the Civil war. Sadler is an Arkansas man, and was in the first battle at Wilson Creek, Mo., August 10, 1861. From that time he served continuously to the end of the struggle, having had but one twelve-hour leave, and never having missed a day from the service. He was with Wheeler on his last raid in Tennessee, and followed the trail of Sherman's march to the sea. The Eleventh Texas, of which he was a member, was, he says, on rear guard at Branchville, S. C., and at Raleigh, ending its career at what was then known as Durham's Station. The last shot, as described by Mr. Sadler, was fired in North Carolina, near Durham, after the preliminaries for the surrender of General Joseph E. Johnston to General William T. Sherman had been arranged. The Eleventh Texas was a part of General Harrison's Brigade, and had dwindled from a full regiment down to only 105. Describing his experience at Durham, Mr. Sadler says: We had been on rear gua
1 2 3 4