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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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May 15th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 1.20
us to our transatlantic kinsmen. No Englishman ought to own as kinsmen men who attempt to protect themselves from the tongues of a handful of women by official and authoritative threats of rape. The bloodiest savages could do nothing more cruel —the most loathsome Yahoo of fiction could do nothing more filthy. The infamous order. The following is the infamous order issued by General B. F. Butler, while in command at New Orleans: headquarters Department of the Gulf, New Orleans, May 15, 1862. As officers and soldiers of the United States have been subjected to repeated insults from women calling themselves ladies of New Orleans in return for the most scrupulous noninterference and courtesy on our part, it is ordered hereafter that when any female shall, by mere gesture or movement, insult or show contempt for any officer or soldier of the United States, she shall be regarded as a woman of the town plying her vocation. By command of Major-General B. F. Butler, George E. S
June 14th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 1.20
e the scathing words out faster and still more forcibly. As his voice died on their ears, the first impulse moved everyone to a long breath of relief. Such stinging words, such terrible denunciation, put with so much of real eloquence, are rarely heard, and could not but have moved the most stolid auditor. Brown was censured by the Speaker, and wore it as a badge of honor. He is the only man who ever pierced the rhinosceronian hide of Ben Butler. The London Saturday Review, of June 14, 1862, said: The proclamation of General Butler, at New Orleans, has been read in England with a horror which no other event in this deplorable Civil war has created. The attention it has excited in Parliament inadequately represents the general feeling of indignation among us. It is difficult to conceive that a civilized man can have written it, or that civilized man can have been fouud to carry it out. This is not a generation in which men shudder at the ordinary horrors and brutalities
February 1st, 1903 AD (search for this): chapter 1.20
Lest we forget-ben Butler. [from the New Orleans, La., Picayune, February 1, 1903.] The Scathing Denunciation of his course in war and peace, delivered in Congress by John young Brown. By Captain James Dinkins. Those who have respect for the maxim, de mortuis nil nisi bonum, will have very little to say for Ben Butler. He was in all truth the most ferocious, cruel and vulgar beast that ever figured in human form in this country. But, living or dead, the truth of history must be written of him, and it is not worth our while to soil the mantle of Charity by spreading it over his beastly record. John Young Brown, of Kentucky, told the plain truth of him when he described him in Congress some years ago as brutal in war, pusillanimous in peace, and infamous in politics. His character was as vile as his features were hideous and repulsive. He was unable to understand an honest man's thoughts, or a gentleman's feelings, and he therefore gloried in his villainy and boasted of
need no special instructions. It may be said that this is no affair of ours, and that if General Butler and his officers choose to treat the ladies of the city they have conquered as Alaric's soldiers treated the nuns of Rome, or as the Sepoys are said to have treated our countrymen at Delhi, it does not concern us in England. It may be so. At least our indignation and our sympathy must be alike barren of practical result. We may be told, as we have been told before, that if we censure Americans with the freedom we have been wont to use toward Englishmen we shall embitter a powerful nation against our country; that we shall be sowing seeds of hatred that we shall reap in war. It is very possible. If generals in supreme command are so thin-skinned that to suppress a sarcasm or a gibe they are content to perpetuate an outrage to which the history of modern warfare can present no parallel, it is likely enough that they may wince at the outspoken language in which English politicians
Richard Brown (search for this): chapter 1.20
enunciation of his course in war and peace, delivered in Congress by John young Brown. By Captain James Dinkins. Those who have respect for the maxim, de mortuis soil the mantle of Charity by spreading it over his beastly record. John Young Brown, of Kentucky, told the plain truth of him when he described him in Congress somhall for ages to come Remember the monster, thou vilest of scum. John Young Brown addressed the House in these words: Mr. Speaker,—The South is broken. It lianed forward, as if he wanted to drink in the fearful arraignment to the full. Brown was evidently deeply in earnest, and after the first interruption by Hale, of Nof his words became apparent, the Speaker rattled savagely with his gavel. But Brown was no more to be stopped than a whirlwind. He leaned forward, his face crimsoce, are rarely heard, and could not but have moved the most stolid auditor. Brown was censured by the Speaker, and wore it as a badge of honor. He is the only m
B. F. Butler (search for this): chapter 1.20
thing more cruel —the most loathsome Yahoo of fiction could do nothing more filthy. The infamous order. The following is the infamous order issued by General B. F. Butler, while in command at New Orleans: headquarters Department of the Gulf, New Orleans, May 15, 1862. As officers and soldiers of the United States have nsult or show contempt for any officer or soldier of the United States, she shall be regarded as a woman of the town plying her vocation. By command of Major-General B. F. Butler, George E. Strong, Adjutant-General. When Butler died the Nashville American had this to say: Old Ben Butler is dead! Early yesterday morning tButler died the Nashville American had this to say: Old Ben Butler is dead! Early yesterday morning the angel of death, acting under the devil's orders, took him from earth and landed him in hell. In all this Southern country there are no tears, no sighs and no regrets. He lived only too long. We are glad he has at last been removed from earth and even pity the devil the possession he has secured. If there is a future of pe
re utterly destitute of moral sense than Beast Butler never lived in this country. Soon after theone of our newspapers published an acrostic on Butler: Brutal and vulgar, a coward and knave, Fs unheard in the farthest corner of the hall. Butler clutched nervously at his desk, and leaned for who ever pierced the rhinosceronian hide of Ben Butler. The London Saturday Review, of June 14, 1862, said: The proclamation of General Butler, at New Orleans, has been read in England with a hmanity was light compared to that of which General Butler has been guilty. He outraged but one victof. If anything can add to the atrocity of General Butler's proclamation it is the slenderness of thof hopeless, helpless shame. Accordingly, General Butler issues his edict: Any lady who shall, by wght that one on the occasion of the death of Ben Butler was not foreordained. The Beast is dead. s be a stain upon the Federal authorities that Butler was not promptly court-martialed and hanged; y[8 more...]
Old Ben Butler (search for this): chapter 1.20
from women calling themselves ladies of New Orleans in return for the most scrupulous noninterference and courtesy on our part, it is ordered hereafter that when any female shall, by mere gesture or movement, insult or show contempt for any officer or soldier of the United States, she shall be regarded as a woman of the town plying her vocation. By command of Major-General B. F. Butler, George E. Strong, Adjutant-General. When Butler died the Nashville American had this to say: Old Ben Butler is dead! Early yesterday morning the angel of death, acting under the devil's orders, took him from earth and landed him in hell. In all this Southern country there are no tears, no sighs and no regrets. He lived only too long. We are glad he has at last been removed from earth and even pity the devil the possession he has secured. If there is a future of peace in store for Ben Butler, after his entrance upon eternity, then there is no heaven and the Bible is a lie. If hell be onl
Constantine (search for this): chapter 1.20
the people among whom they were committed. But this Republican proceeding was done among people for whom their maudlin advocates here claim a special enlightenment and a peculiar courtesy toward women, and is justified by no precedent, or vestige of precedent, in the horrible annals either of despotic repression or warlike success. Tilley and Wallerstein have not left in history a character for exaggerated tenderness—but no such disgrace as this attaches to their name. The late Grand Duke Constantine was not a sentimental Governor. It is said of him that on one occasion he sent to prison the husbands of all the Polish ladies of rank who refused to dance with Russian officers at a state ball. But when we come to speak of guilt such as that of the Republican General, even Constantine's blood-stained crime is spotless. He would have driven from his presence any officer—if any such European officer could have been found—who should have suggested to him the decree that the Polish C<
Oliver Cromwell (search for this): chapter 1.20
es in helplessness and despair, with homes dilapidated, villages wasted, its people bankrupt. Is there nothing in that situation to touch you with pity? If your magnanimity cannot be touched, will you not be moved by the sense of justice? By a conspiracy between the Attorney-General and Kellogg and a drunken Federal Judge, the sovereignty of State was overthrown. That usurpation has been perpetuated since by bayonets. But recently, one of your Generals entered the legislative halls, as Cromwell entered the English Parliament with Colonel Pride, and ruthlessly expelled the occupants. Onward and onward you go in defiance of the sentiment of the country, without pity and without justice, remorselessly determined, it seems, to drive the Southern people to destruction, to give their roofs to the flames and their flesh to the eagles. A Federal General steps on the scene and sends a dispatch to the world that the people of the State are banditti. We have heard it echoed everywhere tha
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