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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Robert Ould (search for this): chapter 1.3
rivilege of knowing both General Mulford and Judge Ould well, and, in his opinion, no better selectied another interview (the last one I had with Mr. Ould, and in which very important exchanges were dColonel Ludlow), that on January 17th, 1863, Judge Ould wrote Colonel Ludlow, complaining in the str to parole and exchange. Id., pp. 186-7. Judge Ould then called Colonel Ludlow's attention to sehe cartel. And on April 11th, 1863, we find Judge Ould again writing Colonel Ludlow, saying: I an pointing out one single instance in which Judge Ould was in error. Notwithstanding all these c infernal regions. On February 9th, 1862, Judge Ould wrote Colonel Ludlow: I see from your owntel, it will be seen that on May 13th, 1863, Judge Ould wrote to Colonel Ludlow again calling his aled by the cartel. (Butler's Book, p. 590.) Judge Ould left General Butler on the 31st of March, wi To this very important and humane letter, Judge Ould says, no reply was ever made. I Southern Hi[12 more...]
U. S. Grant (search for this): chapter 1.3
her prisoners. The letter from General Lee to General Grant, stating the Confederate position on this subjece Series II, Vol. VII, Serial No. 120, p. 101O. General Grant in his reply, seeing that he could not answer thr's Book, p. 592. And the reason assigned by General Grant for this course was that, the exchange of prisonondition of affairs, for which, as we have seen, General Grant was solely responsible, continued, with little cor was so great for a renewal of the cartel that General Grant consented, and from that date exchanges continuehe 1st of October, 1864, General Lee proposed to General Grant to renew the cartel, but no agreement could be rves would have been saved? But, as we now know, General Grant did not wish to keep these men from dying in ourthe fact, as shown by our last report, it was by General Grant's orders that General Sheridan devastated the Vaarmy, and therefore knew him better than we did, General Grant was of coarse moral as well as physical fibre; a
mprehend, its fearful and unutterable iniquity. It would seem that the concentrated madness of earth and hell had found its final lodgment in the breasts of those who had inaugurated the rebellion, and controlled the policy of the Confederate Government, and that the prison at Andersonville had been selected for the most terrible human sacrifice which the world had ever seen. It is true that the statement made by Mr. Blaine was denied, and its falsity fully shown by both Mr. Davis and Senator Hill, of Georgia; and the report of the Committee of the Federal Congress, and an equally slanderous and partisan publication entitled Narration of Sufferings in Rebel Military Prisons (with hideous looking skeleton illustrations of alleged victims), issued by the United States Sanitary Commission in 1864, were fully answered by a counter report of a committee of the Confederate Congress. And it is also true that in 1876, the Rev. John Wm. Jones, D. D., who was then editing the Southern Hist
Philip Stanhope Wormsley (search for this): chapter 1.3
Northern prisons, during the war, the deaths were four thousand less. The per centum of deaths in Southern prisons being under nine, while the per centun of deaths in Northern prisons was over twelve. We think it useless to prolong this discussion, and feel confident that we can safely submit our conduct on this, as on every other point involved in the war, to the judgment of posterity and the impartial historian, and can justly apply to the Southern Confederacy the language of Philip Stanhope Wormsley, of Oxford University, England, in the dedication of his translation of Homer's Iliad to General Robert E. Lee, the most stainless of earthly commanders, and, except in fortune, the greatest. Thy Troy is fallen, thy dear land Is marred beneath the spoiler's heel; I cannot trust my trembling hand To write the things I feel. Ah realm of tombs: but let her bear This blazon to the end of time: No nation rose so white and fair, None fell so pure of crime. Histories now used in our
to be let alone, and that we brought on that war; we say, when these, and other wicked and false charges are brought against us from year to year, and the attempt is systematically made to teach our children that these things are true, and therefore, that we do not deserve their sympathy and respect because of our alleged wicked and unjustifiable course in that war and in bringing it on-then it becomes our duty, not only to ourselves and our children, but to the thousands of brave men and women who gave their lives a free — will offering in defence of the principles for which we fought to vindicate the justice of our cause, and to do this we have to appeal only to the bar of truth and of justice. Respectfully submitted, George L. Christian, Chairman. R. T. Barton, Rev. B. D. Tucker, R. S. B. Smith, John W. Fulton, Charles M. Blackford. Carter R. Bishop, John W. Daniel, T. H. Edwards, M. W. Hazlewood, R. A. Brock, James Mann, W. H. Hurkamp, Micajah woods, Thomas Ellett, Secretary
B. F. Butler (search for this): chapter 1.3
ome time in November or December, 1863, General B. F. Butler was appointed the Federal Commissioner risoners. Immediately on taking charge, General Butler says he saw Mr. Stanton, Secretary of War,he says, Mr. Stanton at once assented to. (See Butler's Book, p. 585.) In other words, he says, in er army. Id., p. 1O18. But to return to General Butler. He says he soon learned that the ConfedeRebels might perpetrate on our soldiers. (See Butler's Book, p. 585.) At first Judge Ould refused to treat with General Butler at all, but in order to resume the cartel, which he was anxious to dothe 31st of March, with the understanding that Butler would confer with his Government about the poild be exchanged until further orders from him. Butler's Book, p. 592. And the reason assigned bygs would be entailed thereby. I said, says General Butler, I doubted whether, if we stopped exchangiced Stanton, Halleck, Sherman, Sheridan, Pope, Butler, Hunter, Milroy, and other Federal officers, w[6 more...]
R. S. B. Smith (search for this): chapter 1.3
to be let alone, and that we brought on that war; we say, when these, and other wicked and false charges are brought against us from year to year, and the attempt is systematically made to teach our children that these things are true, and therefore, that we do not deserve their sympathy and respect because of our alleged wicked and unjustifiable course in that war and in bringing it on-then it becomes our duty, not only to ourselves and our children, but to the thousands of brave men and women who gave their lives a free — will offering in defence of the principles for which we fought to vindicate the justice of our cause, and to do this we have to appeal only to the bar of truth and of justice. Respectfully submitted, George L. Christian, Chairman. R. T. Barton, Rev. B. D. Tucker, R. S. B. Smith, John W. Fulton, Charles M. Blackford. Carter R. Bishop, John W. Daniel, T. H. Edwards, M. W. Hazlewood, R. A. Brock, James Mann, W. H. Hurkamp, Micajah woods, Thomas Ellett, Secretary
ar This blazon to the end of time: No nation rose so white and fair, None fell so pure of crime. Histories now used in our schools. We have but little to add to what was said in our former reports concerning the histories now being taught in our schools, except to express our sincere regret that the State Board of Education, after first excluding it, reversed its action, and put on the list of histories to be used in our public schools, the work entitled Our Country, by Messrs. Cooper, Estill & Lemon. And with the profoundest respect for each member of the Board, we think they committed an unintentional mistake. We understand the Board based its later action on the ground that the edition of this work, published in 1901, contained important amendments, as well as omissions, not found in that of 1896, which was, in our opinion, so justly criticised and condemned by the late Dr. Hunter McGuire and Rev. S. Taylor Martin, D. D., in their reports to this camp in 1899. Whilst it i
Charles Francis Adams (search for this): chapter 1.3
h, the most learned and able, as well as the most prejudiced historian against the South, who has written about the war, said in the Atlantic Monthly of this year: Few who have looked into the history can doubt that the Union originally was, and was generally taken by the parties to it to be, a compact, dissoluble, perhaps most of them would have said, at pleasure, dissoluble certainly on breach of the articles of the Union. And that liberal and cultured statesman and writer, Mr. Charles Francis Adams, of Boston, in an address delivered by him in June last in Chicago (whilst as we understand him, not conceding the right of secession to exist in 1861), said, quoting from Donn Piet's Life of General George H. Thomas, as follows: To-day no impartial student of our constitutional history can doubt for a moment that each State ratified the form of government submitted in the firm belief that at any time it could withdraw there-from. With our quondam enemies thus telling the wo
that Hospitals for prisoners of war are placed on the same footing as other Confederate States Hospitals in all respects, and will be managed accordingly. General Lee's orders. General Lee, in his testimony before the Reconstruction Committee of Congress, says of the treatment of prisoners on the field: The orders alwayGeneral Lee, in his testimony before the Reconstruction Committee of Congress, says of the treatment of prisoners on the field: The orders always were, that the whole field should be treated alike. Parties were sent out to take the Federal wounded, as well as the Confederates, and the surgeons were told to treat the one as they did the other. These orders given by me were respected on every field. And there is nothing in all the records, so far as we can find, which ity of issuing an order declaring, among other things, that Pope and Steinwehr and the commissioned officers of their commands, had chosen for themselves (to use General Lee's words) the position of robbers and murderers, and not that of public enemies entitled, if captured, to be treated as prisoners of war. Later on, in the fall
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