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J. E. B. Stuart (search for this): chapter 1.35
the daring deeds and brilliant bravery of Jeb Stuart's boy artillerist would be almost mere traditirican calvarymen, General J. E. B. Stuart. General Stuart saw what was in the boy, and intrusted himhe attention of a whole Federal battery, until Stuart said to Stonewall Jackson: General, all youody effect. During this fight Jackson said to Stuart, pointing to the young artillerist: General, iared for hours, and a little later he was with Stuart in the bloody track he made from Aldie to Mark others when the enemy almost reached him, and Stuart ordered him to retire, but he begged to be allattle under cover of the river bank. Jackson, Stuart and Lee rode down the Confederate lines to the where the Stuart horse artillery was parked. Stuart called to Pelham and said something. Then Pel he had wished—amid the roar of battle. General Stuart telegraphed to Hon. J. L. M. Curry, at pre, Ala., amid the scenes of his childhood. General Stuart's general order to the division announcing
James E. B. Stuart (search for this): chapter 1.35
Winchester, Va., and was drillmaster of Albertu's Battery. In the meantime, the Federal army, like a huge snake, was coiling itself around Manassas preparatory to striking Richmond. The Confederate army went out to receive the blow and deliver another in return, and Pelham rushed to the front with his battery. All that long day of Manassas he fought with superb courage. So well did he handle his guns that he attracted the attention of that Prince Rupert of American calvarymen, General J. E. B. Stuart. General Stuart saw what was in the boy, and intrusted him with the orgarnization of a battery of six pieces of horse artillery. Some of these men were from Virginia and Maryland, but most of them were from Alabama. From Talladega, Ala., near Pelham's home, went forty men under Lieutenant William McGregor, a gallant officer now living in Texas. One gun was manned by French Creoles from Mobile, Ala., who were called by Pelham the Napoleon Detachment. They were gallant fellows, an
William R. Terry (search for this): chapter 1.35
tion, he was a brilliant actor in all. The memory of the gallant Pelham, his many virtues, his noble nature and purity of character is enshrined as a sacred legacy in the hearts of all who knew him. His record has been bright and spotless, his career brilliant and successful. He fell—the noblest of sacrifice—on the altar of his country, to whose glorious service he had dedicated his life from the beginning of the war. He was calmly and recklessly brave, and saw men torn to pieces around him without emotion, because his heart and eye were upon the stern work he was performing. Such is the brief but resplendent career of the boy artillerist. The deeds of Pelham's nephew, who was a private in Terry's Texas regiment, caused the Texas Legislature to enact that as he, a hero in more than a hundred battles, had fallen while charging the enemy at Dalton, Ga., leaving no issue, the name of a certain child, a nephew, should be changed to Charles Thomas Pelham, to perpetuate his memo
Calhoun (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.35
rank, they have scarcely mentioned much less eulogized the beardless boy whom General Robert E. Lee, in his report of Fredericksburg, termed the gallant Pelham, thus knighting him upon the field. Of this same youth the London Times, in chronicling his death in 1863, said: For his age no soldier on either side in this war (Confederate) has won such fame as has young Pelham. John Pelham came from old Kentucky stock, his father, Dr. Atkinson Pelham, having removed from this State to Calhoun county, Ala., in 1837. Young Pelham was appointed a cadet at West Point in 1856 by the representative in Congress from the Talladega (Ala.) district, Hon. S. W. Harris. The only five-year class in the history of the academy was organized that year, which accounts for his being there at the opening of the war. Like many other West Pointers who have made gallant soldiers, his standing in his classes was low, but his commission was passed on, and he would have received it had he not resigned a week
Culpeper (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.35
d of all the artillery on the Confederate right. Amid shot and shell he had opened the great battle of Fredericksburg and had become immortal. The part played by Pelham at that fight is history that will survive with General Lee's report. He was a major of artillery then. His commission as lieutenant-colonel was issued soon after, and only awaited confirmation when he was killed. This was at Kelly's Ford, on the Rappahannock, March 17th, 1863. He had gone to visit some ladies in Culpeper county, when he heard the cannonading and hurried to the scene. His artillery had not come up, but he galloped to a regiment that was wavering and shouted: Forward, boys! Forward to victory and glory! and at that moment was struck by the fragment of a shell that penetrated the brain and he died shortly after midnight. He died as he had wished—amid the roar of battle. General Stuart telegraphed to Hon. J. L. M. Curry, at present trustee of the great Peabody fund and well known in Louisvil
Jacksonville, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.35
ho then represented Pelham's Alabama district in the Confederate Congress: The noble, the chivalric, the gallant Pelham is no more. He was killed in action yesterday. His remains will be sent to you today. How much he was beloved, appreciated and admired, let the tears of agony we shed and the gloom of mourning throughout my command bear witness. His loss is irreparable. His remains were taken to Richmond and lay in state at the capitol, viewed by thousands. He was buried at Jacksonville, Ala., amid the scenes of his childhood. General Stuart's general order to the division announcing his death concluded: His eyes had glanced over every battlefield of this army, from the first Manassas to the moment of his death, and, with a single exception, he was a brilliant actor in all. The memory of the gallant Pelham, his many virtues, his noble nature and purity of character is enshrined as a sacred legacy in the hearts of all who knew him. His record has been bright and spotless
Dalton, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.35
tion, he was a brilliant actor in all. The memory of the gallant Pelham, his many virtues, his noble nature and purity of character is enshrined as a sacred legacy in the hearts of all who knew him. His record has been bright and spotless, his career brilliant and successful. He fell—the noblest of sacrifice—on the altar of his country, to whose glorious service he had dedicated his life from the beginning of the war. He was calmly and recklessly brave, and saw men torn to pieces around him without emotion, because his heart and eye were upon the stern work he was performing. Such is the brief but resplendent career of the boy artillerist. The deeds of Pelham's nephew, who was a private in Terry's Texas regiment, caused the Texas Legislature to enact that as he, a hero in more than a hundred battles, had fallen while charging the enemy at Dalton, Ga., leaving no issue, the name of a certain child, a nephew, should be changed to Charles Thomas Pelham, to perpetuate his memo
New Albany (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.35
semanship when he visited the academy in 1860. His horseback riding was marvellous, and went down from class to class as a sort of tradition, and long years after he had met a soldier's death the cadets would relate to gaping plebes how Pelham rode. In 1861, when the laughing blue of the Southland sky was overcast by the dark cloud of civil strife and Alabama called to her sons in every clime to come to her defence, Pelham resigned his cadetship at the academy and started South. At New Albany, Ind., he was intercepted by the Federal authorities, for it was known there by some one who reported the fact that he had left West Point to join the Confederate army. He was placed under surveillance and not allowed to cross the river to Louisville. However, he accepted the first opportunity to elude the authorities and went up to Jeffersonville. Around his stay at Jeffersonville and subsequent escape there is woven a pretty little romance, which, whether true or not, is worth relatin
Aldie (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.35
. He again received the thanks of old Stonewall at Second Manassas, where he thrust his guns forward almost into the enemy's columns and used them with bloody effect. During this fight Jackson said to Stuart, pointing to the young artillerist: General, if you have another Pelham give him to me. He was then twenty-three years old. In the bloody repulse the Federals received at Sharpsburg, his guns roared for hours, and a little later he was with Stuart in the bloody track he made from Aldie to Markham's, fighting the immense odds of the foe till they were in a few yards of his guns, drawing off to a better position only to fight again. In was in this gory track that an instance occurred which illustrates his courage. He was with one gun far in advance of the others when the enemy almost reached him, and Stuart ordered him to retire, but he begged to be allowed to remain a little longer, which request was granted. His cannoneers scampered away and left him alone. He loaded t
Markham (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.35
ain received the thanks of old Stonewall at Second Manassas, where he thrust his guns forward almost into the enemy's columns and used them with bloody effect. During this fight Jackson said to Stuart, pointing to the young artillerist: General, if you have another Pelham give him to me. He was then twenty-three years old. In the bloody repulse the Federals received at Sharpsburg, his guns roared for hours, and a little later he was with Stuart in the bloody track he made from Aldie to Markham's, fighting the immense odds of the foe till they were in a few yards of his guns, drawing off to a better position only to fight again. In was in this gory track that an instance occurred which illustrates his courage. He was with one gun far in advance of the others when the enemy almost reached him, and Stuart ordered him to retire, but he begged to be allowed to remain a little longer, which request was granted. His cannoneers scampered away and left him alone. He loaded the piece a
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