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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones).

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January 19th (search for this): chapter 1.36
Maryland and the South. [from the Baltimore sun, January 19, 1904.1 Some of the State's claims advanced for column in Davis monument. Her aid to the Confederacy. Nine Generals in her army were among the State's Contributions— notable heroism of some of her sons. Following is the text of the address made by Mrs. D. Giraud Wright, president of the Maryland Division, United Daughters of the Confederacy, at the State convention held in Baltimore, December 7, 1903: As we meet together to-day for our annual convention and I gather up the threads of the work done by the Maryland Division during the past year to make my report to you, one great fact stands out like a silhouette clearly defined against the background of all the achievements of the last twelve months. Whatever we have or have not done, one thing is sure, and I speak with no uncertain tongue, but glory exceedingly in making the assertion, that the Maryland Division of the Daughters of the Confederacy has
February 7th (search for this): chapter 1.44
ho Ford, on the North Anna, on the 23d of May, and on down at Turkey Ridge on the 9th of June, on the route to Petersburg, around which city, at Battery No. 40, on the 22d of July, Archer's Farm on the 12th, 13th, 18th, and 19th of August, Davis House 21st of August, Jones House 30th of September, Squirrel Level Road 1st of October, Pegram (or Dabney) House 2d of October, Burgess' Mill 27th of October, Jarratt's Depot 10th of December, Crow House 6th of February, 1865, Hatcher's Run 7th February, Five Forks April 1st, Appomattox April 8th. Although but brief mention is made of these sixteen or seventeen battles around Petersburg, they were regular pitched battles, in which large numbers of troops were engaged, and where some as hard and desperate fighting was done as occurred on any field during the war. It was the series of battles which occurred when Grant was trying to get possession of the Southside Railroad. Wherever a battery or section of artillery was needed, at morn,
February 22nd (search for this): chapter 1.3
annals of Charleston, for more than half a century, that it is only in order to refer very briefly to it here. Founded by William Lownes in 1807, upon receiving the news of the Leopard and Chesapeake affair, its roll of thirteen commanders down to 1861, reveals the character of its membership-Lowndes, Cross, Crafts, Simons, Miller, Gilchrist, Ravenel, Lee, Jervey, Porter, Walker, Hatch, Simonton. The public observance of Washington's birthday, by an oration and social functions, on 22d February, was an annual feature of W. L. I. life, and the annual response from the community indicated the highest public favor. This observance was continued up to and in the war period, the last celebration taking place in Fort Sumter while the command was part of the garrison of the gateway of Charleston, on the 22d of February, 1862. Referring to earlier annals, the W. L. I. was designated, with the Fusileer Francaise, as the special guard of honor to Lafayette, upon his entrance in the ci
hen we all exult in a unified American history, and wear one common chaplet for bravery and heroism? Are we not brothers? It seems to me that there should be few dissenting voices to the courteous proposal embodied in the bill before the Virginia Senate. The precedent which I instance should have tremendous weight in procuring a decision favorable to placing the Lee memorial in the Capitol hall of Statuary. To like effect are the words of President Roosevelt, uttered on the 9th of last April, the anniversary of Lee's surrender, at the Charleston Exposition, where he said: We are now a united people; the wounds left by the great Civil War incomparably the greatest war of modern times, have healed, and its memories are now priceless heritages of honor, alike to the North and to the South. The devotion, the self-sacrifice, the steadfast resolution and lofty daring, the high devotion to the right as each man saw it, whether Northerner or Southerner, all these qualities of the men a
d on a chest with a river in the background, and two sailors in the corner; engraved by Hoyer & Ludwig. The $100 is very inferior in design and engraving, and has in the center negroes loading cotton, while an overseer looks on; a sailor in the corner; engraved by Hoyer & Ludwig. Two interest-bearing bills (interest two per cent. a day) were issued early in 1862. The dates are written in ink, in one case being July 8th, 1862, and on the other October 29th, although the issue was made in April. One of these has a train of cars with the sea and a steamer in the background, and in the lower left corner a dashing looking milkmaid, with pail upon her head; engraved by J. T. Paterson. The other bill has a picture of negroes hoeing in a field, a portrait of Henry Clay to the left, and the figure of Ceres on the right; engraved by Keatinge & Ball. June 2d, 1862, the first issue of small bills was made. The $1 has an old-fashioned side-wheel steamer, and in the lower right corner a p
ire of infantry, but right well did the men acquit themselves, although they had to mourn the death of many brave men and one gallant officer, Lieutenant James Ellett, who fell early in the action. No officer of the company was more beloved than he, and none more deserved the affection of the men. After Burnside's bloody repulse, came a lull for three or four months, and we amused ourselves in winter quarters until the roads dried up and the spring campaign opened. In the latter part of April we were again upon the march, and came up with the enemy on the 1st of May at Chancellorsyille, but this time under a new commander, General Fighting Joe Hooker having succeeded Burnside. Ah! who of the Crenshaw Battery does not remember Chancellorsville? Who can forget the incessant fighting of the 1st, 2d, and 3d of May, when we struck the enemy first in front, and then in rear, in the race down the plank road behind Rodes' Division after the Flying Dutchmen, of Howard's Eleventh
na, on the 23d of May, and on down at Turkey Ridge on the 9th of June, on the route to Petersburg, around which city, at Battery No. 40, on the 22d of July, Archer's Farm on the 12th, 13th, 18th, and 19th of August, Davis House 21st of August, Jones House 30th of September, Squirrel Level Road 1st of October, Pegram (or Dabney) House 2d of October, Burgess' Mill 27th of October, Jarratt's Depot 10th of December, Crow House 6th of February, 1865, Hatcher's Run 7th February, Five Forks April 1st, Appomattox April 8th. Although but brief mention is made of these sixteen or seventeen battles around Petersburg, they were regular pitched battles, in which large numbers of troops were engaged, and where some as hard and desperate fighting was done as occurred on any field during the war. It was the series of battles which occurred when Grant was trying to get possession of the Southside Railroad. Wherever a battery or section of artillery was needed, at morn, noon or night, the Cre
ral army was greatly elated over the success it achieved at Fort Donelson, while the Confederates, painfully reminded of that disaster, were anxious and impatient to efface it from the minds of our people. It was on this day, the afternoon of April 2, that General Johnston decided to attack Grant before Buell, who was moving with all dispatch with five strong divisions, could effect a junction with him. General Johnston determined, if possible to take Grant by surprise and defeat him before . M., at which time the Federals began to advance. In order to present the causes and follow the events, let us begin with the time when the Confederate army was at Corinth. Generals Johnston and Beauregard met at 1 o'clock on the night of April 2, and deliberated over the coming movement. At halfpast 1 o'clock on the morning of the 3d the corps commanders were notified to be in readiness to move at a moment's notice. By noon of that day the whole Confederate army was under arms and rea
ger hold the defences guarding the capital, his main line of defences at Petersburg having been broken, which necessitated a withdrawal of his other forces, he advised President Davis, in a telegram received by him while attending divine services, that Richmond should be evacuated by the government simultaneously with the withdrawal of his army. The situation left no alternative. So, with his cabinet, and attended by his staff, President Davis left at once for Danville. This was on the 2d of April. Upon arriving at Danville the Presidential party was met at the depot, taken to his residence, and entertained by Major W. T. Sutherlin, a wealthy and prominent citizen, who held the offices of commissionary and commandant at this place, and who had been a member of the Secession Convention of Virginia. Here the President and his cabinet remained until the 10th of April. Here also were the cabinet meetings held, the proclamation issued, and orders transmitted. During this time the
person to Generals Polk, Bragg and Hardee his plans, and they were directed to put their forces in motion. Nothing could have been more inspiring than the spirit and enthusiasm with which the entire army entered upon the movement. At noon of April 3 the whole army was ready to begin the march. From some cause, however, the First Corps, though ready and anxious, did not move at the hour appointed, and therefore did not bivouac that night as far in advance as General Johnston expected they would do. During the night of April 3 it rained very heavily, and this greatly retarded the movements. Bragg did not advance the second day beyond Monterey, whereas it was expected that by the evening of the 4th the whole army would be near enough the enemy to attack on the morning of tha 5th. It has never been satisfactorily explained why Polk's and Bragg's Corps were so long making the march over the short distance from Corinth to Monterey. A cavalry force was sent in advance to obtain i
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