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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones).

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The Washington Light Infantry, 1807-1861. The primal duties shine aloft, like stars; The charities that soothe and heal and bless.
The Washington Light Infantry, 1807-1861. The primal duties shine aloft, like stars; The charities that soothe and heal and bless.
et (I think it was) where their officers were paroled and put in charge of Major Houston Hall, of the 62d Virginia (Mounted) Infantry. The gallant and amiable Major hired conveyances for the whole party at Newmarket, and, a sufficient store of old apple brandy having been laid in, the journey to Staunton was made very pleasant for all hands. The truth of the proverb that Kindness is never thrown away has seldom been better illustrated than in this case. Some time during the winter of 1864-65 Major Hall had the misfortune to be captured, and was sent to Fort Delaware for safe keeping. I was there at the same time and recollect very well when the news was brought into our barracks that a new regiment had come to release the one that had for some time been doing guard duty on the island. In a little while word of inquiry for Major Hall of the 62d Virginia, was passed through the barracks. The Major answered the call and went off with the orderly, wondering what was wanted with him
nd the authorities. Finally, one afternoon, as the paper was about to go to press, a detachment of soldiers, under an officer, with orders, arrested the editor and his two partners, destroyed or appropriated the newspaper property, and on that same day hurried the three prisoners, via the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, to Charlestown, Va., whence they were sent into the Confederate lines and warned not to return, under pain of being treated as spies. This outrage occurred in September, 1863, one month before Lieutenant Richardson was so terribly wounded. Editor Richardson returned to Baltimore at the close of the war and lived to a ripe old age, greatly respected, and honored with public office; indeed, was a distinguished citizen, always. Many there are who see in all this something like retributive fate. And observing minds have noted coincidences during and since that hateful war, indicating retribution following dark deeds done. Majors Harry Gilmor and T. Sturgis Davis we
Abraham Lincoln (search for this): chapter 1.10
l officer so badly wounded, as related by Lieutenant Berkeley, was not a field officer. He was Lieutenant Charles H. Richardson, of Baltimore, adjutant of the 9th Maryland Federal Regiment. His hip-bone was shattered, but he recovered, though left very lame, and died some years after the war. It was said that he was one of the worst wounded men in the war to recover. The affair at Charlestown was probably the only fight in which he participated. The regiment was organized in response to Lincoln's proclamation of June 15, 1863, calling for additional troops to repel the Confederate invasion of Maryland and Pennsylvania, and the expectation was that it would be employed only in home defense and not sent outside of Maryland. Richardson's kinspeople, in Baltimore, were divided on the questions involved in the war. His father had gone from the Whig party into the Know Nothing, the Native American, and, finally, the Black Republican party—as it was then styled. But a brother of his
J. E. B. Stuart (search for this): chapter 1.10
ctober, 1863, General Imboden's Brigade was encamped in Rockingham county, Virginia, when he received an order from General Lee to proceed to Berryville, meet General Stuart there and in conjunction with him make an attack on Harper's Ferry and Charlestown, and, if possible, capture both. General Sullivan's (Federal) Brigade waevoted to the cause we were fighting for. Every may from that section able to carry arms was in the Confederate army. Some belonged to the Stone-Brigade, some to Stuart's Cavalry, and some to Chew's celebrated Battery of Horse Artillery. There were two companies of cavalry —the Clark Cavalry, Company D, 6th Virginia, and Baylor'n on earth. Our advance arrived in Berryville late in the evening of the 17th of October, and drove a scouting party of the enemy out of town. We did not find Stuart there, as we expected, our scouts reporting that he could not cross the Shenandoah river on account of high water. The General decided to attack Charlestown alon
market (I think it was) where their officers were paroled and put in charge of Major Houston Hall, of the 62d Virginia (Mounted) Infantry. The gallant and amiable Major hired conveyances for the whole party at Newmarket, and, a sufficient store of old apple brandy having been laid in, the journey to Staunton was made very pleasant for all hands. The truth of the proverb that Kindness is never thrown away has seldom been better illustrated than in this case. Some time during the winter of 1864-65 Major Hall had the misfortune to be captured, and was sent to Fort Delaware for safe keeping. I was there at the same time and recollect very well when the news was brought into our barracks that a new regiment had come to release the one that had for some time been doing guard duty on the island. In a little while word of inquiry for Major Hall of the 62d Virginia, was passed through the barracks. The Major answered the call and went off with the orderly, wondering what was wanted with
Joseph E. Johnston (search for this): chapter 1.10
untains from Beverley to Harper's Ferry, and consequently never had his full brigade in camp together at one time. At this time he had less than 1,000 men with him. General John D. Imboden raised the Staunton Artillery before the war, and it was the first battery that took the field in Virginia. It took a very conspicuous part in the first battle of Manassas, and on account of the skillful way his guns were handled that day Imboden was promoted from captain to brigadier-general. Both Johnston and Beauregard complimented him in their official reports of that battle. Imboden's Brigade, at the time of the order mentioned above, was composed of the Sixty-second Virginia Mounted Infantry, commanded by that distinguished officer, Colonel George W. Smith, a graduate of the Virginia Military Institute; the Eighteenth Virginia Cavalry, by the General's brother, Colonel George W. Imboden, now a prominent lawyer in West Virginia; White's Battalion, by Major Robert White, late Attorney-G
s, of Maryland, who had won his laurels under Turner Ashby; Gilmor's Battalion of Rangers, by Harry Gilmor, of Baltimore, who was as rough and daring a rider as ever drew a saber; McNeil's Rangers, of Hardy and Hampshire counties, West Virginia, commanded by Captain John H. Mc-Neil. This was the company that later in the war, under the immediate command of Jesse McNeil, son of Captain J. H. McNeil, first lieutenant of Company D, rode into Cumberland, Md., and brought out two major-generals, Crook and Kelly, from the very midst of their commands. Finally, McClanahan's Battery, commanded by Captain John H. McClanahan, a Texan, who had served under Ben McCullough in Texas until it got too peaceable there for him. So, as may be seen, our General had in his brigade a lot of choice spirits, and was well equipped to make a daring raid into the enemy's lines. The writer had the honor to command a section of McClanahan's Battery. Some years ago a Yankee major, giving an account of t
September, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 1.10
other side, and the authorities. Finally, one afternoon, as the paper was about to go to press, a detachment of soldiers, under an officer, with orders, arrested the editor and his two partners, destroyed or appropriated the newspaper property, and on that same day hurried the three prisoners, via the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, to Charlestown, Va., whence they were sent into the Confederate lines and warned not to return, under pain of being treated as spies. This outrage occurred in September, 1863, one month before Lieutenant Richardson was so terribly wounded. Editor Richardson returned to Baltimore at the close of the war and lived to a ripe old age, greatly respected, and honored with public office; indeed, was a distinguished citizen, always. Many there are who see in all this something like retributive fate. And observing minds have noted coincidences during and since that hateful war, indicating retribution following dark deeds done. Majors Harry Gilmor and T. St
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