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mander, General Fighting Joe Hooker having succeeded Burnside. Ah! who of the Crenshaw Battery does not remember Chancellorsville? Who can forget the incessant fighting of the 1st, 2d, and 3d of May, when we struck the enemy first in front, and then in rear, in the race down the plank road behind Rodes' Division after the Flying Dutchmen, of Howard's Eleventh Corps, when Jackson made his celebrated flank movement. (Howard's Corps was composed of Germans.) They were easy marks. But on the 3d, when we had to cut a road through the woods to prevent annihilation before we could get in position, it was not so easy, and as far as the eye could reach when we debouched from the road there was nothing to be seen but lines of battle. The Crenshaw Battery went into position near the centre of the battalion, and soon one of the hottest artillery fights of the war was on, while infantry engaged infantry on either side. After several hours' fighting our artillery actually drove the enemy fr
ed their infantry there in four or five lines of battle outflanking the works and charged up the line, and finally captured the three guns, although the men behind them fought until the infantry were about to bayonet them. The lines then broke everywhere, but we got off with the three remaining guns of the Crenshaw Battery. Then commenced the last act in the tragedy of four years—the retreat to Appomattox. Sleepless nights and days of hunger and fighting from the 3d to the evening of the 8th, when we unlimbered our guns for the last time, and repulsed the enemy's attack, supported only by a few artillerymen with muskets—the Otey Battery—when night came on. The next day we cut down our guns, and sorrowfully wended our way homeward. The curtain fell. That was the end. Incidental. Captain Crenshaw was ever mindful of the welfare of his old command, and one of his first acts after going to Europe for the government was to send a full uniform and a pair of boots to each member<
f May, 1864, the battle of Spotsylvania Courthouse was fought, followed by bloody battles again on the 11th and 18th. In all the desperate fighting in Spotsylvania the Crenshaw Battery was always in the forefront, and always acquitted itself nobly. It did the same thing again at Jericho Ford, on the North Anna, on the 23d of May, and on down at Turkey Ridge on the 9th of June, on the route to Petersburg, around which city, at Battery No. 40, on the 22d of July, Archer's Farm on the 12th, 13th, 18th, and 19th of August, Davis House 21st of August, Jones House 30th of September, Squirrel Level Road 1st of October, Pegram (or Dabney) House 2d of October, Burgess' Mill 27th of October, Jarratt's Depot 10th of December, Crow House 6th of February, 1865, Hatcher's Run 7th February, Five Forks April 1st, Appomattox April 8th. Although but brief mention is made of these sixteen or seventeen battles around Petersburg, they were regular pitched battles, in which large numbers of tr
t being used for the white flag of surrender. General White (one of the garrison) had a leg shot away by one of the Crenshaw's 6-pounders. General Miles was the commanding officer. Upwards of eleven thousand prisoners, seventy-two pieces of artillery, all their small arms and munitions of war were captured. Captain Crenshaw was detailed to look after and dispose of the artillery, horses, and supplies, which was done satisfactorily; but scarcely had the task been completed when, on the 17th, orders came to hasten to Sharpsburg, where a battle was raging. The situation there was very critical—so critical, indeed, that the horses were not allowed to water in the Potomac while crossing it. The Light Division went immediately into action and the battery along with it. When we got to the position assigned us, with scarcely men enough to man the guns, we found a battery on the brow of the hill whose cannoneers had been driven from the guns, and saw a heavy column of the enemy m
in position by General J. E. B. Stuart in person, disposed of Taylor in short order without the aid of infantry or cavalry, Stuart's cavalry (which had gotten in their rear), capturing nearly all of the brigade we failed to kill or wound. Having loaded down the gun carriages and caissons with the plunder we had captured, Captain Crenshaw directed the head of the battery to move out into the road leading to the old Manassas battlefield, which we reached the 27th of August, and here, on the 28th, 29th, and 30th was fought Second Manassas, one of the most desperate and hard-fought battles of the campaign, where Jackson's Corps alone held the whole of Pope's army at bay for nearly two days, until Longstreet could unite with him. The Crenshaw Battery played no small part in this severe battle, but did not suffer a great deal because it fired from a concealed position most of the time. Capture of Harper's Ferry. Still driving Pope's army, the battery moved on to Harper's Ferr
February 7th (search for this): chapter 1.44
ho Ford, on the North Anna, on the 23d of May, and on down at Turkey Ridge on the 9th of June, on the route to Petersburg, around which city, at Battery No. 40, on the 22d of July, Archer's Farm on the 12th, 13th, 18th, and 19th of August, Davis House 21st of August, Jones House 30th of September, Squirrel Level Road 1st of October, Pegram (or Dabney) House 2d of October, Burgess' Mill 27th of October, Jarratt's Depot 10th of December, Crow House 6th of February, 1865, Hatcher's Run 7th February, Five Forks April 1st, Appomattox April 8th. Although but brief mention is made of these sixteen or seventeen battles around Petersburg, they were regular pitched battles, in which large numbers of troops were engaged, and where some as hard and desperate fighting was done as occurred on any field during the war. It was the series of battles which occurred when Grant was trying to get possession of the Southside Railroad. Wherever a battery or section of artillery was needed, at morn,
ire of infantry, but right well did the men acquit themselves, although they had to mourn the death of many brave men and one gallant officer, Lieutenant James Ellett, who fell early in the action. No officer of the company was more beloved than he, and none more deserved the affection of the men. After Burnside's bloody repulse, came a lull for three or four months, and we amused ourselves in winter quarters until the roads dried up and the spring campaign opened. In the latter part of April we were again upon the march, and came up with the enemy on the 1st of May at Chancellorsyille, but this time under a new commander, General Fighting Joe Hooker having succeeded Burnside. Ah! who of the Crenshaw Battery does not remember Chancellorsville? Who can forget the incessant fighting of the 1st, 2d, and 3d of May, when we struck the enemy first in front, and then in rear, in the race down the plank road behind Rodes' Division after the Flying Dutchmen, of Howard's Eleventh
na, on the 23d of May, and on down at Turkey Ridge on the 9th of June, on the route to Petersburg, around which city, at Battery No. 40, on the 22d of July, Archer's Farm on the 12th, 13th, 18th, and 19th of August, Davis House 21st of August, Jones House 30th of September, Squirrel Level Road 1st of October, Pegram (or Dabney) House 2d of October, Burgess' Mill 27th of October, Jarratt's Depot 10th of December, Crow House 6th of February, 1865, Hatcher's Run 7th February, Five Forks April 1st, Appomattox April 8th. Although but brief mention is made of these sixteen or seventeen battles around Petersburg, they were regular pitched battles, in which large numbers of troops were engaged, and where some as hard and desperate fighting was done as occurred on any field during the war. It was the series of battles which occurred when Grant was trying to get possession of the Southside Railroad. Wherever a battery or section of artillery was needed, at morn, noon or night, the Cre
and on down at Turkey Ridge on the 9th of June, on the route to Petersburg, around which city, at Battery No. 40, on the 22d of July, Archer's Farm on the 12th, 13th, 18th, and 19th of August, Davis House 21st of August, Jones House 30th of September, Squirrel Level Road 1st of October, Pegram (or Dabney) House 2d of October, Burgess' Mill 27th of October, Jarratt's Depot 10th of December, Crow House 6th of February, 1865, Hatcher's Run 7th February, Five Forks April 1st, Appomattox April 8th. Although but brief mention is made of these sixteen or seventeen battles around Petersburg, they were regular pitched battles, in which large numbers of troops were engaged, and where some as hard and desperate fighting was done as occurred on any field during the war. It was the series of battles which occurred when Grant was trying to get possession of the Southside Railroad. Wherever a battery or section of artillery was needed, at morn, noon or night, the Crenshaw Battery was hard
they had to mourn the death of many brave men and one gallant officer, Lieutenant James Ellett, who fell early in the action. No officer of the company was more beloved than he, and none more deserved the affection of the men. After Burnside's bloody repulse, came a lull for three or four months, and we amused ourselves in winter quarters until the roads dried up and the spring campaign opened. In the latter part of April we were again upon the march, and came up with the enemy on the 1st of May at Chancellorsyille, but this time under a new commander, General Fighting Joe Hooker having succeeded Burnside. Ah! who of the Crenshaw Battery does not remember Chancellorsville? Who can forget the incessant fighting of the 1st, 2d, and 3d of May, when we struck the enemy first in front, and then in rear, in the race down the plank road behind Rodes' Division after the Flying Dutchmen, of Howard's Eleventh Corps, when Jackson made his celebrated flank movement. (Howard's Corps
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