hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 216 0 Browse Search
Stonewall Jackson 170 2 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis 162 8 Browse Search
John B. Gordon 156 2 Browse Search
Robert Edward Lee 146 6 Browse Search
Robert E. Lee 144 0 Browse Search
J. Cabell Early 122 0 Browse Search
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) 103 1 Browse Search
W. R. Grant 100 0 Browse Search
H. B. McClellan 90 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

Found 48 total hits in 18 results.

1 2
June 14th, 1904 AD (search for this): chapter 1.34
Address of General Stephen D. Lee, [from the Richmond, Va., News-leader, June 14, 1934.] Before the United Confederate Veterans, at Nashville, Tenn., June 14th, 1904. The following is the address delivered by Lieutenant-General Stephen D. Lee, commander-in-chief United Confederate Veterans, at Nashville, Tenn.: It is impossible for me to respond to the kindly and cordial welcome so fitly spoken to my comrades who wore the gray without thinking of the great soldier and orator upon whom this duty would have fallen if he had not been taken from us. It was in historic Nashville, seven years ago, that his eloquent voice gave utterance to the gratitude of our hearts to the citizens of this beautiful city for the hospitality for which they are famous, and which to-day has laid us under new obligations. It was here that he placed in your hands his commission as your chieftain and sought to retire into private station. With an outburst of loyal devotion, resistless as the wh
June 14th, 1934 AD (search for this): chapter 1.34
Address of General Stephen D. Lee, [from the Richmond, Va., News-leader, June 14, 1934.] Before the United Confederate Veterans, at Nashville, Tenn., June 14th, 1904. The following is the address delivered by Lieutenant-General Stephen D. Lee, commander-in-chief United Confederate Veterans, at Nashville, Tenn.: It is impossible for me to respond to the kindly and cordial welcome so fitly spoken to my comrades who wore the gray without thinking of the great soldier and orator upon whom this duty would have fallen if he had not been taken from us. It was in historic Nashville, seven years ago, that his eloquent voice gave utterance to the gratitude of our hearts to the citizens of this beautiful city for the hospitality for which they are famous, and which to-day has laid us under new obligations. It was here that he placed in your hands his commission as your chieftain and sought to retire into private station. With an outburst of loyal devotion, resistless as the wh
B. F. Ashby (search for this): chapter 1.34
en who nobly died. Your dead comrades shall live again in your words. Their last Commission. The infinite pity and glory of it all will awake the hearts of those who listen and they will never forget. Tell them of Albert Sidney Johnston, of Stonewall Jackson, of Stuart, with his waving plume; of Forest, with his scorn of death. Tell them of Wade Hampton and Gordon, the Chevalier Bayards of the South. Tell them of Zollicoffer, of Pat. Cleburne and Frank Cheatham, of Pelham, of Ashby. Tell them of the great soldier with the spotless sword and the spotless soul who sleeps at Lexington, in the Valley of Virginia. Tell them of the great president, who bore upon his sad heart the sorrows of all his people, and upon whom fell all the blows which passed them over. This, my comrades, is your last commission. Do this for the dead, that they may be loved and honored still. Do this for the living, that they may also become worthy of love and honor. Do this for your couutr
Frank Cheatham (search for this): chapter 1.34
n who bravely lived, the men who nobly died. Your dead comrades shall live again in your words. Their last Commission. The infinite pity and glory of it all will awake the hearts of those who listen and they will never forget. Tell them of Albert Sidney Johnston, of Stonewall Jackson, of Stuart, with his waving plume; of Forest, with his scorn of death. Tell them of Wade Hampton and Gordon, the Chevalier Bayards of the South. Tell them of Zollicoffer, of Pat. Cleburne and Frank Cheatham, of Pelham, of Ashby. Tell them of the great soldier with the spotless sword and the spotless soul who sleeps at Lexington, in the Valley of Virginia. Tell them of the great president, who bore upon his sad heart the sorrows of all his people, and upon whom fell all the blows which passed them over. This, my comrades, is your last commission. Do this for the dead, that they may be loved and honored still. Do this for the living, that they may also become worthy of love and honor.
Patrick Cleburne (search for this): chapter 1.34
les fought, the men who bravely lived, the men who nobly died. Your dead comrades shall live again in your words. Their last Commission. The infinite pity and glory of it all will awake the hearts of those who listen and they will never forget. Tell them of Albert Sidney Johnston, of Stonewall Jackson, of Stuart, with his waving plume; of Forest, with his scorn of death. Tell them of Wade Hampton and Gordon, the Chevalier Bayards of the South. Tell them of Zollicoffer, of Pat. Cleburne and Frank Cheatham, of Pelham, of Ashby. Tell them of the great soldier with the spotless sword and the spotless soul who sleeps at Lexington, in the Valley of Virginia. Tell them of the great president, who bore upon his sad heart the sorrows of all his people, and upon whom fell all the blows which passed them over. This, my comrades, is your last commission. Do this for the dead, that they may be loved and honored still. Do this for the living, that they may also become worthy
John B. Gordon (search for this): chapter 1.34
ure motives, the unselfish sacrifice. Tell of the hardships endured, the battles fought, the men who bravely lived, the men who nobly died. Your dead comrades shall live again in your words. Their last Commission. The infinite pity and glory of it all will awake the hearts of those who listen and they will never forget. Tell them of Albert Sidney Johnston, of Stonewall Jackson, of Stuart, with his waving plume; of Forest, with his scorn of death. Tell them of Wade Hampton and Gordon, the Chevalier Bayards of the South. Tell them of Zollicoffer, of Pat. Cleburne and Frank Cheatham, of Pelham, of Ashby. Tell them of the great soldier with the spotless sword and the spotless soul who sleeps at Lexington, in the Valley of Virginia. Tell them of the great president, who bore upon his sad heart the sorrows of all his people, and upon whom fell all the blows which passed them over. This, my comrades, is your last commission. Do this for the dead, that they may be loved
Stonewall Jackson (search for this): chapter 1.34
nge. Tell it proudly as fits a soldier. There is no shame in all the history. Dwell on the gallant deeds, the pure motives, the unselfish sacrifice. Tell of the hardships endured, the battles fought, the men who bravely lived, the men who nobly died. Your dead comrades shall live again in your words. Their last Commission. The infinite pity and glory of it all will awake the hearts of those who listen and they will never forget. Tell them of Albert Sidney Johnston, of Stonewall Jackson, of Stuart, with his waving plume; of Forest, with his scorn of death. Tell them of Wade Hampton and Gordon, the Chevalier Bayards of the South. Tell them of Zollicoffer, of Pat. Cleburne and Frank Cheatham, of Pelham, of Ashby. Tell them of the great soldier with the spotless sword and the spotless soul who sleeps at Lexington, in the Valley of Virginia. Tell them of the great president, who bore upon his sad heart the sorrows of all his people, and upon whom fell all the blows wh
Joseph E. Johnston (search for this): chapter 1.34
will has made us more than conquerors. We have entered into this city of great men and great memories. We have beheld your educational institutions, sending light and hope into the remotest corners of our beloved land. We have made pilgrimages to the graves of your mighty dead; we have been refreshed by your hospitality. Tennessee gave 115,000. The Confederate soldier does not forget that from the bosom of this old Commonwealth came 115,000 men to follow the banners of Lee and Johnston, and that more than 31,000 were enlisted in the armies of the Union. Tennesseeans believe with their hearts' blood. They did not count the cost when the great question of State or nation had to be settled with drawn swords. They spent the last drop of blood, the last mine of treasure for the defense of Tennessee, their mother and their sovereign. We, the witnesses of that great sacrifice, can never cease to honor Tennessee for the blood of her sons, for the tears and prayers of her da
Stephen D. Lee (search for this): chapter 1.34
Address of General Stephen D. Lee, [from the Richmond, Va., News-leader, June 14, 1934.] Before the United Confederate Veterans, at Nashville, Tenn., June 14th, 1904. The following is the address delivered by Lieutenant-General Stephen D. Lee, commander-in-chief United Confederate Veterans, at Nashville, Tenn.: ItLieutenant-General Stephen D. Lee, commander-in-chief United Confederate Veterans, at Nashville, Tenn.: It is impossible for me to respond to the kindly and cordial welcome so fitly spoken to my comrades who wore the gray without thinking of the great soldier and orator upon whom this duty would have fallen if he had not been taken from us. It was in historic Nashville, seven years ago, that his eloquent voice gave utterance to the gray. Tennessee gave 115,000. The Confederate soldier does not forget that from the bosom of this old Commonwealth came 115,000 men to follow the banners of Lee and Johnston, and that more than 31,000 were enlisted in the armies of the Union. Tennesseeans believe with their hearts' blood. They did not count the cost when
ived, the men who nobly died. Your dead comrades shall live again in your words. Their last Commission. The infinite pity and glory of it all will awake the hearts of those who listen and they will never forget. Tell them of Albert Sidney Johnston, of Stonewall Jackson, of Stuart, with his waving plume; of Forest, with his scorn of death. Tell them of Wade Hampton and Gordon, the Chevalier Bayards of the South. Tell them of Zollicoffer, of Pat. Cleburne and Frank Cheatham, of Pelham, of Ashby. Tell them of the great soldier with the spotless sword and the spotless soul who sleeps at Lexington, in the Valley of Virginia. Tell them of the great president, who bore upon his sad heart the sorrows of all his people, and upon whom fell all the blows which passed them over. This, my comrades, is your last commission. Do this for the dead, that they may be loved and honored still. Do this for the living, that they may also become worthy of love and honor. Do this for y
1 2